Quick Prepper Tip: Liquid Gold in a Jar

By Lisa Metheny published on in General, Prepper Talk, Quick Prepper Tips

Home preppers are always looking for items that have long shelf life and serve multiple purposes. One such item every home prepper should keep a healthy supply of is honey. The rich, thick, sticky, golden goodness of honey was known in ancient times as the “nectar to the gods,” and for good reason. Today, those same benefits make honey ideal for the home prepper.

Honey: Liquid Gold

Honey is liquid gold.

Basic Facts

First, honey never spoils. If kept free of pests, dirt and debris, honey has a shelf life like no other food. One of the oldest foods in existence, honey is the only food that includes all the substances necessary to sustain life—including water. It does not need refrigeration or freezing. You can leave it unopened at room temperature in a dry place indefinitely.

Nutritional

Honey contains vitamins, amino acid and antioxidants, but it is also fat-free, cholesterol free and sodium free. It is also nature’s energy booster, thanks to its concentrated energy source. Because it has about 25 percent more fructose, honey is sweeter, so you will need less than if you were using regular table sugar.

Medicinal

Honey speeds the healing of open wounds and combats infection. It also can attract and absorb moisture, making it remarkably soothing for minor burns. Additionally, it helps prevent scarring and speeds the healing of open wounds. Honey also has a natural anti-microbial agent, which helps deters the growth of certain types of bacteria, yeast and molds.

Do you have an alternative use for honey? Tell us in the comment section.

Lisa Metheny is a published award-winning outdoor writer, photographer, speaker and outdoor skills instructor. Lisa holds several instructor certifications and conducts a number of women-focused outdoor seminars on topics such as archery and hunting throughout the year. She regularly teaches hunters education and archery classes and has become an advocate for promoting traditional outdoor recreation to families across the United States. Lisa is also an avid and accomplished hunter with many big game species to her credit. She is a member of POMA and former Board of Directors member as well as a member of the NRA, RMEF, MDF and DU.

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Comments (6)

  • mike j

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    maybe the scientist could find a cure for certain diseases like cancer or aids. I wonder just how much they have experimented with honey. would it be great to find cures from something that is starring us in the face.

    Reply

  • Hank Alvarez

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    Now comes the question: are you talking about raw honey or the processed crap we get at the store? I’ve heard that once it’s gone through the pasteurization process most of the nutrient and medicinal values are gone and all you’ve got is a sweetner. Anybody have some advice on this? Hank

    Reply

  • Bill from Boomhower, Texas

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    My mom is 91, andher only physical ailments have been a heart murmer, and two years ago, a broken leg, with some authritous, and she’s substituted honey for sugar in her coffee, as well as most anything one would add sugar to, since I was a little boy. But then, she has a wheelbarrow of herb bottles, and believes Dr. Oz hung the moon. I’m guessing it all was the stuff she’d find on the grocery store shelves. A couple of times when I was a truck driver, I’d stop at some stand in the middle of nowhere, to buy private un-processed honey from folks on the roadside. I wouldn’t know whether processed would matter. Interesting post, Lisa, I have heard of preppers keeping bees, maybe there’s something to it all.

    Reply

  • James Riley

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    Yes Honey.I say it over and over.

    Reply

  • Montana Steve

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    Background in Special Forces Medical training and served as a Corpsman in the Coast Guard until going into Aviation.
    I read an article on Russian use of Bee Pollen in controlling/curing of grass, ragweed, pollen allergies.
    Start out taking one tablet and wait 24 hours. If you do not have a reaction such as hives, itching or tightness in breathing after 24 hours try 2 tablets and wait another 24 hours. This is commonly referred to as a “Waterfall ingesting”.
    I ran the Allergy and Immunization Clinic at a Coast Guard facility and started telling patients about this, especially the ones who were having no relief of symptoms or increasing their reactions with pain, swelling, itching around the areas I had to inject them with their Doctor’s concoctions.
    I cannot tell you that everyone took me up on it, but those who did, noticed that in several months time they no longer needed injections and quit a few Doctors complained to the Director of the facility where I worked at and I was ordered to stop telling them.
    After going into Coat Guard Aviation, I had a friend who was having terrible reactions to his allergy shots, and it usually took him two days to recover from the effects of them. He really had a bad time mowing the lawn, or just being in a hot, humid area in the Spring time and Summer. I told him about the Bee Pollen in the Winter time, and by Spring he no longer needed shots. He had worked up to 6 tablets daily, and no longer needed the shots.
    Bee Pollen is the perfect food for the very reason Honey is. It contains a tremendous amount of vitamins, Amino Acid, and is absorbed very slowly by the body, giving it time to build up immunity to allergies.
    However, the instructions must be followed strictly, and they must be discontinued if one notices any reactions including runny nose (increasing) tightness of breath or hives. Make sure to have either a good antihistamine or adrenaline shots available. But I never heard of anyone using them to suffer anything from the taking of them.

    Reply

  • Larry

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    What is better than honey is to have a bee hive or hives. I started last year with 1 hive and now I have 3 and will add 2 more next year. Besides getting honey, bees are very interesting little creatures. I have really enjoyed my experience!!

    Reply

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