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ConcealedCarry9_5_Galco_IWB_Holster

Should Employers Require Employees to Get a Carry Permit?

For years, the anti gunners have railed against concealed weapon permits putting law-abiding self-defenders on the defensive (no pun intended). Many businesses and business owners have followed suit by posting the places of employment or placing a negative stigma on anyone who carries. This has forced most concealed carriers to hide more than their handgun. But why?

Savage Arms Model 10 GRS rifle right angled

Secret Weapon for Long Range — Savage Arms Model 10 GRS

The 6.5 Creedmoor was certainly the big news from this year’s SHOT Show and likely to be future of long-range shooting. If you are serious about going long, Savage’s new Model 10 GRS will be a must have regardless of whether you go with the newer, sexy 6.5 Creedmoor or the venerable .308 Winchester. Here is the full release from Savage Arms.

Two boxes of Buffalo Bore Ammunition

Reader Comments of the Week — April 22, 2017

Even regular readers of The Shooter’s Log can’t read or respond to all of the comments, so we have started a new weekly feature that will recap a sampling of the most active, interesting, or on occasion, randomly selected comments from the previous weeks. Feel free to respond with your two cents at the bottom of this article or by clicking the story link and adding it directly to the discussion.

U.S. Law Shield vidoe cover of the Castle Doctrine

Texas: Understanding Castle Doctrine and Stand Your Ground Laws

Independent Program Attorney Emily Taylor of Walker & Byington details the intricacies of Castle Doctrine and No Duty to Retreat laws and what they mean to gun owners in Texas. Click the video below to see more.

Check out these other great articles from U.S. Law Shield and click here to become a member:

The just-released video above is from the Florida State Attorney’s Office, supporting a judge’s ruling that a citizen who opened fire on a man attacking a Lee County deputy last year was justified in using deadly force.

Taking the family to a state or national park this summer? Then you need to know the rules about firearms carry at your destinations, in state or out of state. Click to watch Independent Program Attorney Michele Byington explain various park rules controlling where you can — and definitely cannot — take your gun. And please take the poll at the bottom to tell us if you take firearms with you on vacation. All poll responses are completely confidential.

action photo with flames shooting from the muzzle of a handgun

After You Get a Concealed Weapons Permit 101

It is encouraging to see so many Americans obtaining their concealed weapon permit. These new shooters are supporters of the Second Amendment and have taken steps to be responsible for their own safety and security. Yet, in many cases, there are people among them that are armed with a deadly weapon but unable to defend themselves well.

100 dollar bills

NSSF: $25 Million More to Anti-Gun Group Will Fund a Lot of Astroturf

In today’s environment, with multi-millionaires and billionaires throwing money at politically motivated causes they favor, social media is being used to create the appearance that more Americans support a cause or political view than the numbers really bear out. This is not only deceptive, it is dangerous. Here is the full scoop from the National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF).

Holstered pistol in an inside the waistband holster

NRA: 5 Reasons to Support National Reciprocity

National reciprocity is a priority for most of America’s legal gun toting community, so what’s the hold up? We have been promised this would be a priority under President Trump, and legislation was introduced in Congress in the first few days of January. Now all we need is the action to make it happen. Until then, here are a few good argument from the NRA on why we need this legislation.

Candidate Donald Trump at 2016 NRA-ILA Leadership forum

President Trump to Speak at the NRA-ILA Leadership Forum

Certainly one of, if not the biggest highlights of the 2016 NRA convention was when then candidate Trump spoke. I do not say this due to any partisan political views. Instead, I am recalling the mile-long line to get into the convention hall to see Trump speak hours before the NRA opened the doors. Regardless of the political preferences of the participants, all were pro gun and wanted to hear his message. Now, fast forward one year and candidate Trump is President Trump, but I am sure the lines will not be any shorter.

Assembled AR-15 pistol on bed of rocks

Reader Comments of the Week — April 15, 2017

Even regular readers of The Shooter’s Log can’t read or respond to all of the comments, so we have started a new weekly feature that will recap a sampling of the most active, interesting, or on occasion, randomly selected comments from the previous weeks. Feel free to respond with your two cents at the bottom of this article or by clicking the story link and adding it directly to the discussion.

3 Buffalo Bore .38 Super bullets and one upset round

Buffalo Bore Ammunition

Some years ago, long time hunter, handloader, and experimenter Tim Sundles founded Buffalo Bore Ammunition. At first, he concentrated on big bore loads with the slogan Strictly Big Bore Strictly Business.

Constitution of the United States

NRA: No Second-Guessing the Second Amendment

In 1776, America’s Founders came together in Philadelphia to draw up a “Declaration of Independence,” ending political ties to Great Britain. Written by Thomas Jefferson, the Declaration explains people’s rights and how people create governments:

WE hold these Truths to be self-evident, that all Men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness-That to secure these Rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just Powers from the Consent of the Governed.

By Robert Pew

In modern English: We don’t get our rights from the government; we’re born with those rights, and the government should protect them.

Eleven years later, after independence had been won, our Founders assembled once again to draw up a plan for governing the new nation. That plan became the Constitution of the United States of America.

Constitution of the United States

During the debate over the Constitution, many Americans were worried that a strong federal government would trample on the individual rights of citizens, as the British had done. To protect the basic rights of Americans, the Founders added the first 10 amendments to the Constitution. Those amendments are known as the Bill of Rights. They represent the fundamental freedoms that are at the heart of our society, including the First Amendment freedoms of speech and religion, and the Second Amendment right of the people to keep and bear arms.

The meaning of the Second Amendment has been debated for decades. Does the Second Amendment protect an individual right for all Americans? Or does it only protect the right to keep and bear arms while participating in an organized force, such as the National Guard? Or does it only protect the “right” of the states to have a National Guard in the first place?

Some people have claimed there was no individual right to keep and bear arms. However, anyone who understands the Declaration of Independence knows that rights-by definition-belong to individuals. And in the Bill of Rights, the freedoms of religion, freedom of speech and the rest all refer to individual liberties.

The Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms is no different. The first Congress had no doubt about its meaning. Most of the Founders were gun owners and hunters. George Washington and Thomas Jefferson exchanged letters about their gun collections. The Founders had just finished winning their freedoms with guns in their hands, and soon passed a law requiring most male citizens to own at least one gun and 30 rounds of ammunition. They believed citizens should be able to protect themselves and their country against attacks on life and liberty.

So, where did anyone get the idea that the Second Amendment doesn’t protect an individual right? That theory was invented in the 20th century, by people who rejected what seemed like common sense to our Founding Fathers. Instead, they claimed that the Second Amendment only protects the government.

Now, the Supreme Court has thrown out that idea.

In 1975, Washington, D.C. passed some of the most extreme gun laws in the nation. Handguns were banned. All guns had to be stored disassembled and locked, making them useless for self-defense. City leaders claimed it would make the city safer. But Washington’s murder rate soared, and our nation’s capital soon became known as America’s murder capital.

In 2003, a group of Washington residents filed a lawsuit challenging these harsh gun laws. They said that Washington’s gun laws violated the Second Amendment because the laws took away the right to use firearms for self-defense, even in their own homes.

The first court that heard the case said that D.C.’s laws were constitutional. The residents appealed, and the appeals court agreed that the laws violated the right to keep and bear arms, after all.

Now, the city appealed. By 2008, the case, which by then was known as D.C. vs. Heller, had gone to the Supreme Court. To make their decision, the Supreme Court justices studied the words and history of the Second Amendment. In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court agreed with the citizens: The Second Amendment protects an individual right, not a “state’s right.” The decision struck down the District’s laws that banned handguns and that kept people from using guns for self-defense in their homes.

No Supreme Court decision ever ends a political debate, though. Now, the NRA and citizens around the country are going to court to challenge states and cities with restrictive gun laws. But the landmark Heller decision provided a key answer to the most important part of the debate: The Second Amendment protects an individual right to keep and bear arms.