Ammunition

BANNED: An Overview of Restricted Guns, Ammo and Parts in Each State

Banned Guns, Ammo and Accessories by State

Gun laws in America can be complex and varied, to say the least. There are nations in which gun laws are the same in every province. Ours? Not so much. That is because we have strong state governments, and this is a good thing.

You must be aware of local laws. I have authored more than 6,000 firearm-related articles, written 14 books on the topic of firearms and served as a peace officer and security professional for decades. I’m still learning new things related to laws every day.

The fact is, laws change. Even the most thorough research becomes outdated at some point. This brings us to today’s article about banned guns, ammo and parts/accessories in each state.

Why read up on this topic? For starters, some things you would never have guessed are illegal. As an example, did you know that some states ban “wallet holsters?”

These are holsters that allow you to carry a handgun like a Beretta .25 ACP (or sometimes a small revolver) in the back pocket. Pocket holsters that accomplish the same thing are not banned.

Be careful, as many things you are able to purchase easily online could be illegal in your home state. Some are patently illegal, others are illegal only if you carry them.

How to Read This Article

I don’t want to be a test case for any law and most of the time there is a reasonable alternative to the banned item. It is ultimately your responsibility to study your own state laws and those of the states you travel in.

That being said, this is a report on certain items that are banned in one state or another. Feel free to use it as a reference for your own research. It contains pertinent gun laws nationwide and is separated on a state-by-state basis.

Laws might be deeper and more complex than they first appear. Double-check the laws for your state. Also, remember that these laws are subject to change.

At the end of the day, you should never order anything that is illegal in your state. You may find yourself broke and in jail over what many of us would think is a trivial matter. Other violations are much more serious and bad news all of the way around.

This report is for entertainment purposes only. It is your responsibility to conduct a thorough study of the laws in your state and obey them. The following list should cover things you should not purchase or order if you are in one of those states.

Just because your state has liberal concealed carry laws and gun ownership is respected, it doesn’t mean that there are no odd exclusions. Some things you think would not be illegal, are.

(A couple examples: Nyclad ammunition is illegal in some states and hollow-point ammunition isn’t legal for day-to-day carry in others.) Anyway, let’s get to it.

What follows is a list of prohibited projectile-related items in all 50 states. These are not concealed carry laws or laws for other items (destructive devices, knives, etc.).

NOTE ABOUT TITLE II WEAPONS: While some states explicitly ban machine guns and destructive devices, others do not. This does not mean that you can go purchase them like any other firearm. Any weapon that qualifies as a Title II Weapon is subject to additional requirements and steps to obtain (per guidelines outlined in the National Firearms Act).

The List: Banned Guns, Ammo and Parts in Each State

DISCLAIMER: This is not intended to be a comprehensive or complete list of gun laws. The information provided is not intended as legal advice or a restatement of law. For any particular situation, it is highly recommended that a licensed local attorney be consulted for an accurate interpretation. The opinions and statements expressed in this article belong to the author and do not necessarily represent Cheaper Than Dirt, nor is the company at fault for any gun-related legal decisions you make.

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Banned in Alabama:

  • Brass or steel Teflon-coated handgun ammo, unless designed to expand on contact.

Banned in Alaska:

  • None; free state with no major restrictions on guns, ammo or parts.

Banned in Arizona:

  • None; free state with no major restrictions on guns, ammo or parts.

Banned in Arkansas:

  • Machine guns and short-barreled rifles.

Note: Arkansas is in the process of removing this ban to allow those who obtain a federal permit to obtain these firearms. Pay close attention to developments.

Banned in California:

  • Fixed ammo (other than a caliber greater than 0.60)
  • Cane guns
  • Wallet guns
  • Undetectable firearms
  • Flechette darts
  • Bullets containing or carrying an explosive agent
  • Tracer ammo, except for those used in shotguns
  • Armor-piercing ammo
  • Unconventional pistols
  • Machine guns
  • Multi-trigger activators
  • Short-barrel rifles or shotguns
  • Silencers
  • Zip guns
  • Assault weapons (there’s a banned list). Assault weapon is also defined as any semi-automatic, centerfire rifle that does NOT have a fixed magazine with any one of the following: pistol grip, thumbhole stock, folding/telescoping stock, grenade or flare launcher, flash suppressor or forward pistol grip. Also includes any semi-automatic, centerfire rifle with a fixed magazine holding more than 10 rounds, any semi-automatic, centerfire rifle less than 30 inches in length. With pistols, any semi-automatic pistol that does NOT have a fixed magazine, but that does have one of the following is an assault weapon: threaded barrel, second handgrip, barrel shroud, or the ability to attach magazine anywhere outside of the pistol grip. Also includes any semi-automatic handgun with a fixed magazine holding more than 10 rounds. A semi-automatic shotgun is an assault weapon if it has a folding or telescoping stock, a pistol grip, a detachable magazine, or a revolving cylinder.
  • .50 BMG rifles (without a permit); .50 BMG ammo is not outlawed
  • SKS rifles made to use AK magazines
  • Magazines holding more than 10 rounds (as of August 2020, this is being challenged)
  • Handguns not certified for sale by the AG

Notes for California: ammunition checks for ammunition applies. There is also a melting-point law that effectively prohibits non-ferrous material in handguns. California in general is an incredibly strict state for gun owners; the roster of legal guns must be closely studied before ordering. While your FFL must be up to date on what is a legal transfer, you should not put them in the position for refusing a transfer.

AR-15 Rifle with magazine and ammo
California considers the AR-15 an assault weapon and bans it.

Banned in Colorado:

  • Machine guns
  • Magazines holding more than 15 rounds

Note for Colorado: silencers were recently removed from an illegal list, along with short-barrel rifles or shotguns — you still need to obtain federal paperwork.

Banned in Connecticut:

  • Assault weapons, except for Olympic pistols. Also, any semi-automatic, centerfire rifle with a detachable magazine that has one of the following: folding or telescoping stock, pistol grip, thumbhole stock or similar, forward pistol grip, flash suppressor, grenade or flare launcher. Also any semi-automatic, centerfire rifle with a fixed magazine capacity more than 10 rounds, or with a length less than 30 inches. Also, semi-automatic pistols with a detachable magazine that has one of the following: magazine attaches outside of the pistol grip, threaded barrel, barrel shroud or second handgrip. Also, any semi-automatic pistol with a fixed magazine holding more than 10 rounds. Any semi-automatic shotgun with a pistol grip, a folding or telescoping stock, a detachable magazine or a revolving cylinder.
  • Armor-piercing ammo
  • Incendiary .50-caliber ammo
  • Short-barrel shotguns
  • Magazines holding more than 10 rounds (grandfathered in if bought before April 5, 2013)

Note for Connecticut: silencers are legal with the proper paperwork. Silencers are not allowed for hunting, however.

Banned in Delaware:

  • Silencers (exemptions for wildlife biologists who have special permits)
  • Short-barrel shotguns
  • Machine guns (exemptions for experimental or scientific research)
  • Trigger cranks

Banned in Florida:

  • Armor-piercing or exploding ammo
  • Dragon’s breath shotgun shells, bolo shells or flechette shells
  • Bump stocks and binary triggers

Banned in Georgia:

  • None; free state with no major restrictions on guns, ammo or parts.

Banned in Hawaii:

  • Assault pistols. Defined as “a pistol that accepts a detachable magazine that has two or more of the following: magazine that attaches outside the pistol grip, threaded barrel, barrel shroud, weighs more than 50 ounces, centerfire pistol with OAL greater than 12 inches or a semi-automatic version of an automatic gun.” Doesn’t include guns with a barrel of 16 inches or greater, or C&R guns.
  • Automatic firearms
  • Rifles with barrel lengths less than 16 inches
  • Shotguns with barrel lengths less than 18 inches
  • Cannons
  • Mufflers
  • Silencers
  • Tefloan-coated ammo (or ammo coated with similar material designed to enhance penetration through metal/armor, or designed to explode)
  • Multi-burst trigger activators
  • Trigger cranks
  • Magazines holding more than 10 rounds (that are capable of being used in a pistol)

Note for Hawaii: firearms are registered with local police. The same goes for ammunition. There is also a melting-point law so you will not see firearms with a low melting point and non-ferrous material.

Banned in Idaho:

  • None; free state with no major restrictions on guns, ammo or parts.

Banned in Illinois:

  • Machine guns
  • Silencers
  • Explosive bullet
  • Firearms with a low melting point or non-ferrous material (melting-point law)
  • FOID Cards for purchase required
  • Any rifle having one or more barrels less than 16 inches in length, or a shotgun having one or more barrels less than 18 inches in length
  • Any weapon made from a rifle or shotgun, whether by alteration, modification or otherwise, if such a weapon as modified has an overall length of less than 26 inches
  • Armor-piercing bullets, dragon’s breath shotgun shell, bolo shell or flechette shell

Note for Illinois: it is also unlawful to use of a firearm in the shape of a wireless telephone (this law was passed soon after the introduction of the same type of firearm).

Banned in Indiana:

  • Armor-piercing ammo, unless the person:
    • Manufactures, sells or delivers armor-piercing ammunition does so for the use of:
      • The United States
      • A department or agency of the United States
      • A state
      • A law-enforcement agency
      • A department, agency or political subdivision of a state
    • Manufactures, sells or delivers armor-piercing ammunition for export.
    • Manufactures, sells or delivers armor-piercing ammunition for the purpose of testing or experimentation.
    • Is a law enforcement officer acting in the course of the officer’s official duties.
Armor Piercing Ammo
Armor-piercing ammo is banned in Indiana and several other states.

Banned in Iowa:

  • None; free state with no major restrictions on guns, ammo or parts.

Banned in Kansas:

  • Setting spring guns
  • Possessing, manufacturing, causing to be manufactured, selling, offering for sale, lending, purchasing or giving away any cartridge that can be fired by a handgun and has a plastic-coated bullet that has a core of less than 60% lead by weight, whether the person knows or has reason to know that the plastic-coated bullet has a core of less than 60% lead by weight

Banned in Kentucky:

  • Selling armor-piercing ammo

Banned in Louisiana:

  • Machine guns (with certain exceptions)
  • Armor-piercing ammo

Banned in Maine:

  • Armor-piercing ammo, except as part of a collection

Banned in Maryland:

  • Assault weapon (there’s a ban list by name, which you can search here). Assault weapon is also defined as a semi-automatic, centerfire rifle with any two of the following: folding stock, grenade or flare launcher, or flash suppressor. Also, a semi-automatic, centerfire rifle with fixed magazine capacity more than 10 rounds, or with a length less than 29 inches. Also a semi-automatic pistol with a fixed magazine holding more than 10 rounds, or semi-automatic shotgun with folding stock or revolving cylinder.
  • Possession of restricted ammo:
    • Contains explosive or incendiary material designed and intended for use in a firearm
    • Has a core constructed, excluding traces of other substances, entirely from one or a combination of:
      • Tungsten alloys
      • Steel
      • Iron
      • Brass
      • Beryllium copper
      • Depleted uranium
      • An equivalent material of similar density or hardness to those listed above
  • Firearms with a low melting point or non-ferrous material (melting-point law)
  • Any firearm not on the state’s approved firearms list

Note for Maryland: the state is strict with its approved firearms list, so if the manufacturer changes the model number for any reason (even if it’s just a change in color), the firearm is banned until it’s added back to the approved list again.

Banned in Massachusetts:

  • Assault weapon (ban list, includes revolving-cylinder shotguns).
  • Large-capacity feeding device (magazine holding more than 10 rounds or five shotshells) that was not otherwise lawfully possessed on September 13, 1994.
  • Covert weapons
  • Silencers, unless a federally-licensed firearms manufacturer, an authorized agent of the municipal police training committee, or a duly-authorized sworn law-enforcement officer while acting within the scope of official duties and under the direct authorization of the police chief or his designee, or the colonel of the state police, who sells, keeps for sale, offers, gives or disposes of by any means other than submitting to an authorized law enforcement agency, or uses or possesses any instrument, attachment, weapon or appliance for causing the firing of any gun, revolver, pistol or other firearm to be silent or intended to lessen or muffle the noise of the firing of any gun, revolver, pistol or another firearm.

Note for Massachusetts: the assault weapon ban doesn’t apply to guns that cannot readily accept a detachable magazine holding more than 10 rounds, or a shotgun that cannot hold more than five rounds.

Banned in Michigan:

  • Pistols greater than 26” in length, unless the person:
    • Registered the firearm as a pistol under sections 2 or 2a before January 1, 2013
    • Registered the firearm and has maintained registration of the firearm since January 1, 2013, without lapse.
  • Machine guns (though this prohibition does not apply to a person licensed by the federal government to manufacture, sell or possess a machine gun)
  • Spring guns
  • Armor-piercing ammo, unless you are a licensed dealer

Banned in Minnesota:

  • Set guns/swivel guns, spring guns
  • Machine guns, unless licensed dealers
  • Trigger activators (like binary triggers, probably, trigger crank, anything that manually or by power-driven means activates the trigger to increase the rate of fire comparable to a machine gun)
  • Machine gun conversion kits
  • Short-barrel shotguns, unless licensed dealers
  • “Saturday Night Special” pistols: any firearm (other than children’s toys or pop guns, or a gun that uses CO2, air or other vapor as the propellant force, or antique firearm) that has a frame, cylinder, barrel or breechblock made of:
    • A material that has a melting point less than 1000-degrees Fahrenheit
    • Any material with ultimate tensile strength less than 55,000 pounds per square inch
    • Made of any powdered metal with a density of less than 7.5 grams per cubic centimeter.
  • Firearms with a low melting point or non-ferrous material (melting-point law)

Notes for Minnesota: A person who violates a provision relating to set guns or swivel guns is guilty of a gross misdemeanor. Whoever sets a spring gun, pitfall, deadfall, snare or other like dangerous weapon or device may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than six months or to payment of a fine of not more than $1,000, or both.

Short barrel shotgun
Short-barrel shotguns are banned in Minnesota.

Banned in Mississippi:

  • None; free state with no major restrictions on guns, ammo or parts.

Banned in Missouri:

  • Explosive weapons
  • A bullet or projectile that explodes or detonates upon impact because of an independent explosive charge after having been shot from a firearm
  • Flashbangs

Banned in Montana:

  • None; free state with no major restrictions on guns, ammo or parts.

Banned in Nebraska:

  • None; free state with no major restrictions on guns, ammo or parts.

Banned in Nevada:

  • Metal-penetrating bullets that can be used in a handgun

Banned in New Hampshire:

  • None; free state with no major restrictions on guns, ammo or parts.

Banned in New Jersey:

  • Short-barrel shotguns
  • Silencers
  • Armor-piercing ammunition (with limited exceptions), dum-dum ammo, etc.
  • Firearms with a low melting point or non-ferrous material (melting-point law)
  • Machine guns
  • Assault firearms (banned list) also includes firearms “substantially identical” to a firearm on the ban list. Includes any semi-automatic rifle that can use a detachable magazine with at least two of the following: folding or telescoping stock, bayonet mount, flash suppressor or threaded barrel, or grenade launcher. Also, any semi-automatic shotgun with at least two of the following: folding or telescoping stock, pistol grip, fixed magazine capacity in excess of five rounds, or ability to accept a detachable magazine. Also, a semi-automatic handgun that can use a detachable magazine with at least two of the following: magazine that attaches to the gun outside of the pistol grip, a threaded barrel, barrel shroud, manufactured weight in excess of 50 ounces, or is a semi-automatic version of an automatic firearm. Also considered assault weapons are semi-automatic shotguns with a magazine capacity in excess of six rounds, a folding stock or pistol grip, and any semi-automatic rifle with a fixed magazine with a capacity greater than 15 rounds.
  • Large capacity magazines — any magazine that holds more than 10 rounds. (Exceptions for fixed, tubular magazines feeding .22 ammunition, and retired LEO are allowed 15-round magazines.)
  • Trigger cranks

Note for New Jersey: Do not carry hollow-point ammunition in your carry gun! The fine is levied on each bullet and transportation of hollow-point ammo is generally limited to your home, the shooting range and traveling between them. An FID card is also required for all firearm purchases.

Banned in New Mexico:

  • None; free state with no major restrictions on guns, ammo or parts.

Banned in New York:

  • Machine guns
  • Silencers
  • Disguised guns (includes wallet holsters and pen guns)
  • Assault weapons: any semi-automatic rifle that can use a detachable magazine with at least one of the following: folding or telescoping stock, pistol grip “that protrudes conspicuously beneath the action of the weapon,” thumbhole stock, second handgrip or protruding grip that can be grasped by the non-trigger hand, bayonet mount, flash suppressor, muzzle brake, compensator, threaded barrel or grenade launcher. Also, semi-automatic shotguns with at least one of the following: folding or telescoping stock, thumbhole stock, second handgrip that can be grasped by non-trigger hand, fixed magazine capacity in excess of seven rounds, or has the ability to use a detachable magazine. Also, semi-automatic handguns that can use a detachable magazine with at least one of the following: folding or telescoping stock, thumbhole stock, second handgrip, magazine that attaches outside the pistol grip, threaded barrel, barrel shroud, manufactured weight greater than 50 ounces, or is a semi-automatic version of an automatic firearm. Also includes all revolving-cylinder shotguns. Does NOT include manually-operated guns, permanently inoperable, or antique, semi-automatic rifles that cannot accept a detachable magazine in excess of five-round capacity, semi-automatic shotguns that cannot hold more than five rounds in either a fixed or detachable magazine.
  • Large-capacity magazines holding more than 10 rounds
  • Firearms with a low melting point or non-ferrous material (melting-point law)

Note for New York: SBRs and SBSs are not specifically, by that or a similar name, banned in NY, but are covered under the handgun portion of assault-weapon definition as banned firearms.

Stacked 30-round ar-15 mags with ammo
Magazines like these (which hold 30 rounds) are banned in New York.

Banned in North Carolina:

  • Teflon-coated ammo

Banned in North Dakota:

  • None; free state with no major restrictions on guns, ammo or parts.

Banned in Ohio:

  • None; free state with no major restrictions on guns, ammo or parts.

Note for Ohio: A permit is necessary to possess “dangerous ordnance:” any automatic or short-barreled firearm, zip guns, supporessors or parts to convert a firearm into a dangerous ordnance. (Source)

Banned in Oklahoma:

  • Restricted bullets: a round or elongated missile with a core of less than 60% lead and having a fluorocarbon coating, which is designed to travel at a high velocity and is capable of penetrating body armor.

Banned in Oregon:

  • None; free state with no major restrictions on guns, ammo or parts.

Banned in Pennsylvania:

  • “Offensive weapons” are a first-degree misdemeanor. Machine guns, silencers and short-barrel long guns are also “offensive weapons,” but have an exception (that the other items are not afforded) for their lawful use if they are NFA registered.

Note for Pennsylvania: This state is currently processing several potential gun-related bans. We recommend that you pay special attention to the news and stay updated about what is and isn’t banned in Pennsylvania. 

Banned in Rhode Island:

  • Machine guns (need manufacturer’s license from the state)
  • Untraceable firearms: 3D-printed guns, homemade guns, “ghost guns” without serial numbers, etc.
  • Short-barrel rifles
  • Short-barrel shotguns
  • Silencers
  • Armor-piercing bullets designed for use in pistols
  • Trigger cranks, binary triggers, etc.
Suppressor
Silencers are banned in Rhode Island and other states.

Banned in South Carolina:

  • Teflon-coated ammo

Banned in South Dakota:

  • None; free state with no major restrictions on guns, ammo or parts.

Banned in Tennessee:

  • Explosive ammo

Banned in Texas:

  • Zip guns (“a device or combination of devices that was not originally a firearm and is adapted to expel a projectile through a smooth bore or rifled-bore barrel by using the energy generated by an explosion or burning substance.”)
  • Armor-piercing handgun ammo (specifically listed as “ammo meant to be used in pistols and revolvers”)

Banned in Utah:

  • None; free state with no major restrictions on guns, ammo or parts.

Banned in Vermont:

Banned in Virginia:

  • Machine guns that aren’t registered with state police
  • Plastic firearms: any firearm, including machine guns and short-barrel shotguns as defined in this chapter, containing less than 3.7 ounces of electromagnetically-detectable metal in the barrel, slide, cylinder, frame or receiver of which, when subjected to inspection by X-ray machines commonly used at airports, does not generate an image that accurately depicts its shape.
  • Striker 12, commonly called a “streetsweeper,” or any semi-automatic, folding-stock shotgun of like-kind with a spring-tension drum magazine capable of holding 12 shotgun shells.

Banned in Washington:

  • Machine guns (pre-1995 grandfathered in)
  • Short-barrel shotguns (pre-1995 grandfathered in)

Notes for Washington: sales are limited to those aged 21 and older. There is a “semi-automatic assault rifle” safety training program required for any firearm the state labels an “assault rifle,” such as AR-15s and other MSRs.

RPK belt-fed machine gun
Machine guns are a no-go in Washington.

Banned in West Virginia:

  • None; free state with no major restrictions on guns, ammo or parts.

Banned in Wisconsin:

  • None; free state with no major restrictions on guns, ammo or parts.

Banned in Wyoming:

  • None; free state with no major restrictions on guns, ammo or parts.

What are the banned guns, ammo and accessories in your state? Let us know in the comments below if there’s anything anyone making a purchase decision should keep in mind.

The Mission of Cheaper Than Dirt!'s blog, The Shooter's Log, is to provide information—not opinions—to our customers and the shooting community. We want you, our readers, to be able to make informed decisions. The information provided here does not represent the views of Cheaper Than Dirt!

Comments (42)

  1. You got Iowa wrong, we cannot own machine guns unless we have an FFL AND A SOT PERMIT, which is prohibitively VERY EXPENSIVE 🙁

    Though, on the bright side, supressors, SBR’s or any other NFA weapon is still OK (DOES NOT include cannons, destructive devices, etc.).

  2. Ninth Circuit Court strikes down the magazine ban. Texas, don’t become like the Communist Republic of California. That’s what voting democrat will do to you.

  3. How can there be so many murders and killings in Chicago and New York if so many weapons are banned? Just wondering.

  4. I would recommend downloading the “legal heat” app. They run ccw classes all over and offer the app free. They are pretty good at keeping up with ccw related laws in all the states for the app.

  5. In Michigan, a pistol that is more than 26 inches long is legal to own so long as it’s registered federally as a short barrel rifle and the tax stamp is carried along with the pistol. Also, machine guns are legal if all NFA rules are followed. Spring guns, however, are illegal.

  6. Rhode Island has recently implemented a ban on 3D printed firearms, firearms constructed entirely of plastic, and untraceable, non-serialized “ghost guns” or otherwise nontraceable homemade firearms.

  7. just a note to say:
    Appreciate your various articles but, it seems to leave a sense or feeling in my mind? “I didn’t know that?” Or, “I think I knew that at one time?” Or, makes sense to me?” The only thing that might make the reading more enjoyable is a pack of beagles hot on trail running in the background! lol What can I say more, what can I do? Oh, I Know, “Hats off too you.” ARkey

  8. Forgot binary triggers in Florida. Technically anything that speeds up the fire rate is illegal, which would include light buffers and crisp short triggers. Ruling happened after Parkland shooting and rino Scott signed it. What a putz.

  9. Forgot binary triggers in Florida. They got banned along with bump stocks on the state level before the ATF took federal action. Scary thing is that anything that speeds up the fire rate is technically illegal now, which would also include light buffers and crisp short triggers.

  10. Perhaps CTD or the Author could post a hot link, or an option on page to allow this post to be printer friendly? That way those who travel a lot could stay on top of the current situation.

  11. Texas Penal Code Section 46.01(16) “Zip gun” means a device or combination of devices that was not originally a firearm and is adapted to expel a projectile through a smooth bore or rifled-bore barrel by using the energy generated by an explosion or burning substance.” Section 46.05 designates the mere possession or manufacture of a zip gun as a FELONY. That will get you locked up for a loooong time.
    If you build a gun from scratch in your backyard shop in Texas, you could very well end up doing hard time.
    [W3]

  12. Maryland > Basically all firearms are banned unless listed on the state’s APPROVED FIREARMS LIST & MUST NOT DEVIATE from the manufacturer’s model number. If the manufacturer makes a slight change & changes the model number the new model is banned until it is added to the state’s APPROVED FIREARMS LIST even if the change is to denote a different color.

  13. Same reasons to leave California, Illinois, Maryland, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Minnesota and New Jersey. Basically all states controlled by the gun grabbing Democrats. I truly do not understand what the courts/judges think that the the phase “… shall not be infringed.” means. Obviously not what the founding fathers intended.

  14. Many states have the following as banned:

    “Firearms with a low melting point or non-ferrous material (melting-point law)”

    Does this exclude the Glock and other similar handguns? The Glock handguns are on many of the states permitted list.

  15. I think you will find that Washington State requires the semiautomatic rifle training is required for all s/a rifles such as the Ruger 10-22, not just so called “assault rifles”. This state is run by the liberal marxists.

  16. THIS is why I love Kentucky, You cant SELL armor piercing ammo and THATS it. One of the benefits of being a Commonwealth and have GUN RIGHTS written into the state constitution.

  17. Live in New Jersey, my understanding of NJ’s amo law is that you can legally own hollow point amo, transport it from place of purchase to your home, from your home to the shooting range, and back. You may not transport it any where else, forgetting a hollow point 22 long rifle bullet in your pocket is a felony.

  18. Does anyone know that The World’s First ‘Assault Weapon’ was the English Longbow? So Ask yourself what exactly is an “Assault Weapon” anyway? Some of us would assert that it is a lightweight, selective-fire, military-issue shoulder arm firing an intermediate cartridge.

    Clowns such as Charles Schumer and Nancy Pelosi apparently think an “Assault Weapon” is anything more dangerous than dental floss. Regardless of semantics, the English longbow was a world-changing weapon in its day.

    The effectiveness of the English longbow in combat represented a synergistic melding of the English longbow along with the equally critical English long-bowman. Prior to the advent of the longbow, the armored mounted knight dominated the battlefield. The longbow, however, served as a great equalizer, leveling the field and making common men more lethal than their noble counterparts. A good argument for the second amendment.

    The zenith of the longbow as a military weapon occurred during the Hundred Years War. Fought between 1337 and 1453, this conflagration sparked when the English King Edward III laid claim to the French throne. It ended when King Charles VII pushed the English back across the channel. The intervening years saw the English longbow change the way men killed each other.

    Understanding Democrat terms 101
    Democratic Socialism = Socialism
    Toxic Masculinity = Straight white male
    Political Correctness = Controlling Speech
    Assault weapon = Any gun
    Identify as = Proud to be
    Pro Choice = Legalized murder
    Undocumented = Illegal or new voter
    News reporting = Lieberal talking points
    Climate Change = Another tax opportunity
    Inequality = Your money should be theirs
    Racist, Fascist, Nazi = Anyone who disagrees with LIEberals
    Diversity = Less qualified is ok
    Raise taxes = Quicker path to Socialism
    Common Core = Dumbing down our schools
    Democratic Stronghold = Hollywood
    Medicare for All = 12 weeks to see a specialist
    Managed Healthcare = Death panels for seniors
    Hate speech = Anything a Conservative says
    Constitution Law = Do anything we want any time we want
    Conspiracy Theories = Conservative Journalism
    Social Justice Warriors = Antifa/Snowflakes/College Professors

  19. Of the twenty-seven words contained in our Second Amendment “Our founding forefathers were absolutely magnificent and incredibly smart and they didn’t write it in lawyer-ease,” nowhere do I see any caveats allowing for the feral government, any government state or local the ability or responsibility to restrict my God given and constitutionally protected right of self preservation. There are no clauses allowing for background checks, waiting periods, psychological profiling, permitting, or the registration of any firearm to anyone!

    Most of our elected politicians in Government don’t recognize the Clause “the right of the “people” to keep and bear (carry) arms ‘SHALL NOT BE INFRINGED’ However, I do see plenty of elected officials who would just as soon try and TAKE our God given right by usurpative fiat while at the same time refusing to abide by their oaths of office.

    We go back to the simple question of “What part of “shall not be infringed” do these Leftopathic Corruptocratic Globalists not understand”? Any law restricting ownership of any firearm written since 1791 is UNCONSTITUTIONAL and therefore technically unenforceable ! Guns have but two enemies, RUST and Politicians!!!

    As for the NICS Universal background checks, They are the opposite of being effective and a solution to a problem that doesn’t exist. It’s already a crime to sell a firearm to somebody who is not legally allowed to own a firearm, whether one goes through a background check or not, that is already a crime.

    The NICS background check database is “faulty” and “racially biased,” in that minorities are more likely to share a surname with someone else who may have a criminal record.
    Consider for decades now our Bill of rights has been under attack. Again I want to reference the Amendment that the framers intended to guarantee compliance of the other nine amendments, our second amendment.

    I am curious to find out just how many politicians would be willing to place the same caveats as they have on our Second Amendment or any other amendment e.g. file a form and wait several days so one can exercise their first Amendment right to exercise free speech – file a form and wait several days to exercise their third amendment rights protecting us from unreasonable search and seizure. Or the ninth amendment that states that there are other rights that may exist aside from the ones explicitly mentioned, in the Bill of Rights even though they are not listed. Meaning they can be violated. The proverbial political foot is in the door, and APATHY from the American people is allowing the door to usurpation to be thrown WIDE open as if it wasn’t there.

    Regarding Red flag gun confiscation laws; they violate the Fourth Amendment.
    If the government takes somebody’s God-given rights because they think that a person might someday commit a crime, then we enter into the realm of dystopian science fiction movies. Whether one is an ardent defender of the Second Amendment or not, all of us should be concerned about the implications of the Fourth Amendment and due process. The fourth amendment is a foundation of our country.”

    Democrats don’t care about keeping people safe. For Democrats, this issue is about emotion. They’re appealing to emotion and not reason. If they were appealing to reason, they would know ways to keep people safe and that, to quote a book, ‘more guns equal less crime.’ But also for the Democrats, it’s about paying back their donors. Soros and Bloomberg are going to want to get what they paid for, and what they paid for is disarming our society.”

    No one but God can dictate policy to me and my family and I will do whatever it takes to secure my liberty and the liberty of my fellow patriots. Stand in my way try and usurp my rights or otherwise enslave me, you should be prepared to back your actions up with your life as I am prepared to do likewise!!
    There comes a time when you have to stand for the Constitution or die by legislation one usurpative bill at a time.

    I will offer this little but important lesson in history – The reason Americans should be aggressively fighting against gun control is because armed people will not willingly load themselves in boxcars or FEMA camps!

    “Laws forbidding the carrying of arms disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes.” Thomas Jefferson quoting Cesare Beccaria

    If one refuses to fight for what one has then one shouldn’t cry over what they lost!!!

    Members of Congress:
    In regards to ANY attempt to disarm American Citizens aka “we the people”, whether it be through unconstitutional laws, back room deals, or strong arm tactics we will NOT OBEY! Our founders warned us about you, and wrote the 2nd Amendment with YOU in mind. As much as you would like us to all think otherwise, the 2nd Amendment was written for the single purpose; To defend our freedom from tyrants in power!

    More people have been slain by politicians with pens than have been killed by the entire group of legal gun owners for politicians with pens have caused mass murder, civil unrest, and war!!

    Libertas est, non liber – mercedem mihi portionem substantiae sumptus
    Libertas inaestimabilis res est
    Celer Silens Mortalis
    Semper-Fidelis
    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛABE

  20. New Jersey includes pistol grips as one of the two features for rifles to be banned.

    Pistol grip should be included in this wording:

    Assault firearms (banned list) also includes firearms “substantially identical” to a firearm on the ban list. Includes any semi-automatic rifle that can use a detachable magazine with at least two of the following: folding or telescoping stock, bayonet mount, flash suppressor or threaded barrel, or grenade launcher.

  21. Living in Long Island, NY, I wanted an AR-15 style rifle for precision target practice. As many folks know, the AR-15 is perhaps the most versatile long gun available. I came across a company named Dark Storm Industries (DSI) that builds AR-15 style guns that meet NY regulations as of this writing in August 2020. According to present law, these guns are not considered ‘assault’ weapons. I have a 16″ barrel, 10 round magazines (purchased separately), no thread on end of barrel, no forward vertical grip, no pistol or thumb-hole grip. No adjustable stock. No grenade launcher. So I have my AR-15 style rifle that is NY compliant.
    There are probably ways to build your own to be compliant, but the FFL charges might exceed your budget. The DSI gun is not inexpensive! You will pay a premium for compliance in NY and other states. The rifle ended up costing me two-times what I would have payed for a typical AR-15 on the market, Is it as comfortable? Heck no!
    One of the things I have done recently, that I felt was a necessary item on my safety list, was to purchase a nice solid mid-range safe for my guns. I never have children over my house, so that was not an immediate concern, but I am concerned about when I am out of the house and more susceptible to burglary. The writing is on the wall, but regardless, a gun safe just makes sense. The other laws (adjustable stock? LOL), do not. Here’s to happy shooting for all!

  22. WA state: See laws in 1639.
    Semiautos such as Ruger 10\22 are now assault weapons, require class. No sales without ffl involved.

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