Camping & Survival

Seconds Will Get You Seconds

Diamond Push Ups

We have already talked about training your primary or large muscle groups—legs, back, abdominal stomach and chest. These muscles build the “foundation” upon which you will build your “house.” Your body recruits muscles to perform any task in the order of largest to smallest. For example, when you lift a jug of milk, a cascade of muscle fibers begin to be recruited and start twitching. Yours legs will tighten; your abdominal muscles will contract. Your chest and back muscles will begin moving your arm.

Diamond Push Ups
Simple exercises can target different muscles groups. For instance, pushups with your arms shoulder width apart target the chest, arms and shoulders, but by moving your hands inward you will target the triceps, chest and back.
It is your secondary muscle group that we will focus on now. Those secondary muscles will gain you seconds in your shooting—and hunting—times by acting as backup to fatiguing primary muscles, as well as strengthening your grip (allowing for a rock-steady position) and anchoring you solidly to the ground.

An Example

The secondary muscles used to lift a gallon jug of milk include the muscles in your arms—biceps and triceps—but also your forearms and the muscles in your hands controlling your fingers. Your feet and your calves tighten to stabilize your body against the weight of the gallon jug. Small muscles in your shoulder will move and lift it to elevate the load. The following exercises will help in strengthening those muscles.

Diamond Push-ups and Dips

The diamond push-up is similar to a regular push-up, but you move your hands close together so that the muscles in your triceps work harder than your chest and back. You can perform dips two ways—on any parallel bars or railings approximately shoulder-width apart, or reversed off of a step, chair, or raised, solid object.

For both, start with two sets of 10 to 12 and work your way up to three sets to exhaustion with no more than a one-minute rest in between.

Curls

You can perform this exercise easily with an inexpensive set of dumbbells or resistance band available at any big-box or sporting goods store. I bought mine (a 25 lb. set) at a garage sale for $5.00. You can also save your gallon milk jugs, as each weighs approximately 10 pounds.

  1. Start with your hands at your sides, palms forward. Slowly “curl” your arm up and touch the weight to your shoulder.
  2. Do three sets of 10 to 12 or to exhaustion, depending on your intensity and weight amount.
Calf Raises
Your balance receptors are primarily in the toes, which is why you can balance on your tiptoes much easier than your heels. Secondary to this effort is your calves. Calf raises will work both of these critical areas.

Shrug-lifts

Strong shoulders help to accept recoil better, allow for a stronger, more solid mounting of your gun, and are some of the more “recruited” secondary muscles in a variety of shooting-specific holds and rests.

  1. Holding the same weights that you used in curls at your sides, “shrug” your shoulders up and down.
  2. Raise the weight out to the front with a straight arm until it is parallel with the ground.

Calf Raises

This exercise works the calves as well as the muscles in your foot. Need to see how important these muscles are? Try shooting tip-toe to reach a rest that’s just a little too-high.

  1. Using a step, place your toes and the ball of your foot on the step, but allow the back 2/3 of your foot to hang 3/4 off the edge of the step.
  2. Lower your heel to below the level of the step, then raise it up to above the step level.
  3. Start with one set to exhaustion, work your way up to three sets.

Next up: cardio work. How controlling your breathing and heart rate will shrink your groups and make you a better shooter.

Do you have a favorite exercise or workout routine? Tell us about it in the comment section.

The Mission of Cheaper Than Dirt!'s blog, The Shooter's Log, is to provide information—not opinions—to our customers and the shooting community. We want you, our readers, to be able to make informed decisions. The information provided here does not represent the views of Cheaper Than Dirt!

1 Comment;

  1. I hate hearing someone say a 7lb rifle is heavy. What BS. Take the authors advice and do the simple exercises he suggests but I’d like to add a few that I think are better.

    First since many people can’t do a standard push up much less a diamond PU, try doing push up’s by using a countertop to lean toward. Step far enough away so that when you are in the down position your body is at a 45 degree angle. Your arms should be shoulder width apart, staying by your side throughout the movement and not flaring out until you break the 90 degree plane.

    Its not a horse race so do them at a medium steady pace. That will work your shoulders and triceps.

    The second push up is the same position but find something like a pedestal sink so that your hands are in the Hammer position. This PU will hit your chest hard.

    The next exercise I would recommend is a slightly different curl than described by the author. Take the dumbbell (whatever weight you can curl at least 20 times), bend over slightly bracing yourself with your free hand and curl it in the hammer position close to your body and bring it back down in a slow steady movement. This will blast both your biceps, the front of your shoulder and to a lesser extent your chest. Do both arms.

    Next take the same weight and lay on your bed (lot softer than the floor) facing the ceiling with the dumbbell fully extended like you’re doing a bench press and with the weight in the hammer position bend your arm at the elbow until it breaks the 90 degree plane then return to the full extended position. This exercise will work on both the Triceps and the rear of the shoulder.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Time limit exceeded. Please click the reload button and complete the captcha once again.

Your discussions, feedback and comments are welcome here as long as they are relevant and insightful. Please be respectful of others. We reserve the right to edit as appropriate, delete profane, harassing, abusive and spam comments or posts, and block repeat offenders. All comments are held for moderation and will appear after approval.