Glock G17 and G19 Gen4 MOS Are Game Changers — Optic Ready Glocks for Conceal Carry

By Robert Sadowski published on in Firearms, General, Range Reports

There are times when you don’t notice a shift in the paradigm, but with the new Glock G17 and G19 Gen4 MOS (Modular Optic System) pistols the move is obvious and clear.
Conceal carry pistols equipped with optics are the next stage in the evolution of defensive pistols.

Glock G19 MOS pistol left side with spare magazine

The G19 has always been a good conceal carry option, with the Leupold Delta Point reflex sight mounted on the G19 Gen4 MOS it is an excellent defense option.

Glock has taken its most popular models, the full-size G17 Gen4 and compact G19 Gen4, and created MOS variants. The MOS variants that feature a small cover plate just forward of the rear sight. After removing the plate and replacing it with a mounting adaptor the user can mount a reflex red dot sight such as the popular models from Trijicon, Leupold, Meopta, C-More, Docter, and Insight. What this means is, a shooter can acquire a target faster and shoot with more accuracy while doing it with a pistol meant for personal protection. Red dots are not just for competition shooting and hunting any more.

Glock introduced the MOS (Modular Optic System) variants a few years ago. The G34, G35 and G41 Gen4 received the MOS treatment making them easier to equip with a red dot sight for competition shooting. Glock did the same for the 10mm G40 Gen4 MOS. The addition of an optic increases the shooter’s effective range. Mounting a reflex red dot sights increases the speed and aiming accuracy over traditional iron sights—well, plastic sights in the case of Glock. With a red dot, all a shooter needs to do is focus on the red dot and place it on the target. Traditional sights have three planes—rear sight, front sight, and target—that need to be aligned for accurate shooting. Adding a red dot simply seems to be the natural progression for conceal carry pistols.

 
Glock G17 Gen4 MOS
Trigger Striker-fire (DAO)
Barrel Length 4.49 inches
Caliber 9mm
Overall Height height in inches; use decimal numbers
Overall Length 7.95 inches
Overall Width width in inches; use decimal numbers
Weight Unloaded 22.5 ounces
Sights Fixed, dot/outline
Stock or Grip stock type or grip type
Capacity round capacity
Magazine 17+1
Frame Textured polymer modular backstraps

I recently—before the 2016 SHOT Show—had the opportunity to test a G17 Gen4 MOS and G19 Gen4 MOS. I mounted a Leupold Delta Point to them. At the range, I found I was more accurate and faster on target when compared to the same guns using only iron sights. Drawing the G17 and G19 from concealed cover, I experienced a bit of a learning curve. Make sure your concealing garment is out of the way. The optic is obvously higher and could potentially snag.

Glock 19 MOS pistol over a Glock 17 MOS with Sport Ear muffs

The new Glock Gen4 G17 and G19 in MOS variant are ushering in a new generation of optic-ready conceal carry pistols with.

The transition from iron sights to optic also requires the shooter to aim differently. In my case, I needed to slightly lower the muzzle of the pistol to acquire the red dot within the sight’s window. Within a few magazines and practice draws, I was comfortable with the optic sight and the smaller groups in the paper downrange indicated my accuracy had improved. I’ve particularly grown fond of the G19 in a DGS Arms CDC (Compact Discreet Carry) kydex appendix holster, which I modified to fit the new Glock equipped with the Delta Point. I hauled the larger G17 with Delta Point in a Fobus IWBL holster, which required no alterations.

The size of the sight does mean the optic has the potential to snag, but proper training should alleviate any fumbled draws. The battery means you need to replace it on a schedule so you are not caught with a dead battery—both are easily managed. I also used the Delta Point as an improvised handle to rack the slide. Not something I would normally do, but I want to see if the mount held and if the sight went out of zero. I had no issues. The pistol ran like you would expect Glocks to run—flawlessly.

With the G17 Gen4 MOS and G19 Gen4 MOS, Glock is redefining the conceal carry pistol, making the pistol easier and faster to aim, which is an advantage. And we all want the advantage.

 
Glock G19 Gen4 MOS
Trigger Striker-fire (DAO)
Barrel Length 4.02 inches
Caliber 9mm
Overall Height 7.28 inches
Overall Length length in inches; use decimal numbers
Overall Width width in inches; use decimal numbers
Weight Unloaded 21.16 ounces
Sights Fixed, dot/outline
Stock or Grip stock type or grip type
Capacity 15+1
Magazine number of rounds
Frame Textured polymer modular backstraps

The author believes conceal carry pistols equipped with optics are the next stage in the evolution of defensive pistols. Do you see an optic equipped pistol in your future? Do you have any optic equipped pistols? Share your thoughts and experiences in the comments section.

SLRule

Robert Sadowski has written about firearms and hunting for nearly 15 years. He is the author of four gun books, editor of three others and is a contributor to numerous gun-enthusiast magazines, including Combat Handguns, Black Guns, Tactical Weapons for Military and Police, Gun Tests, Personal and Home Defense, Gun Hunter, SHOT Business, and others. He has a personal affinity for large-caliber revolvers and the AR platform.

View all articles by Robert Sadowski

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Comments (25)

  • Dan

    |

    I like and own several glocks but this just seems like a marketing gimmick to me. I prefer to personalize them 1 by 1, not out f the box…just my way of doing things, I guess.

    Reply

  • Sal

    |

    Hi. Nice shooting. I don’t know where you live but here in Illinois your not allowed to carry your gun in a mall. If you look at all the shootings. They have happened in places where people can’t carry. The only thing you should be shooting at 50 to 100 yards away is food. Then you mention people with bad eye sight. They really shouldn’t be shooting at anything that far away. If you can’t see you have no idea what is going on or who your shooting at that far away. And someone that far away from you poses no real threat to you. The only reason you should pull your gun is to protect your life or your family. If you have your gun on you at a mall and you pull it because you hear shots being fired. Once you pull your gun you are now a threat. No one knows who you are. You could be with the shooter. And just as quick as you might pull your gun. Someone else might pull there’s and shoot you. That’s why you don’t shoot at people from far away. They pose no threat to your life. Self defense is hard to prove in defending your life and your families. Do you really want to try to prove it in the defense of others. Putting optics on a handgun so you can be more accurate at distances is not self defense. If you do shoot someone at a distance they will use your own gun against you. Saying you set it up to shoot people far away. When I got my CCW we had to shoot at a target that was 3,5,and 7 yards away. That’s 9-feet 15-feet and 21-feet away I’m just guessing they didn’t pull those distances out of a hat. I’m guessing that might be the distance they see could be self defense any thing over that might be seen as sketchy. I’m just guessing but there’s reasons they do stuff. Now if your a police officer. Apples and oranges. We don’t play by the same rules. I would like to see one expert one professional shooter say you need an optic on your handgun so you can defend yourself in a self defense situation. It’s nice to have bells and whistles on our guns. But you really can’t say their there for self defense. All you really should have time for is point and shoot. I didn’t even know what that was till I took my first class. The instructor told us to point to a picture. Then he asked us how accurate do you think that is. Then he went on showing us how accurate it is. Then he went on telling us about muscle memory. Then after all that he ended it with saying people don’t stand still to get shot. The best way to hit what your shooting at is what everyone tells me. Practice Practice Practice. Having an optic or laser on your gun doesn’t mean your going to hit what you’re pointing at. The way you pull the trigger has a lot to do with what you hit. Please don’t take this the wrong way. In Illinois I have to retreat run away hide try anything I can to take my life out of danger and then only then can I pull and shoot. No stand your ground law here.

    Reply

  • tejasbill1

    |

    One of the pioneers of red dots on pistols is Gabe Suarez. He teaches point shooting without sights at close range (so called defensive distance), but for longer shots, and particularly for those of us with diminishing eye sight, adding the RMR to a pistol increases our ability to shoot more accurately. Yes, we mostly train in the defensive context, where we really need no sights at all, but what about the longer shot – the active shooter at the mall? With innocents all around, you better be able to make that shot, not just get close. Red dots on pistols are made for that context, which, unfortunately, is becoming an increasingly real threat to our everyday lives. Finally, it’s all about placement. The red dot must be installed just in front of the rear sight – never behind it. Ideally, the sights should be taller suppressor sights that co-witness with the dot. I own two Suarez Red Dot V3 Glock slides – one on a Gen3 G17 – my home defense gun, and the other on a Gen4 G19 – my carry gun. With practice, acquiring the dot is automatic. I can consistently hit 8″ steel at 50 yards, and 80% at 100 yards. At 7 yards, I just point from retention ready and hit the center mass – 100% of the time. Practice drawing and shooting from as many positions as you can manage. Laser/Dry Fire drills help tremendously, until you can get to a bermed range that allows such live fire maneuvers. The best thing to remember comes from Clint Eastwood – “A man has to know his limitations.” All the best.

    Reply

    • Sal

      |

      Hi. Nice shooting. I don’t know where you live but here in Illinois your not allowed to carry your gun in a mall. If you look at all the shootings. They have happened in places where people can’t carry. The only thing you should be shooting at 50 to 100 yards away is food. Then you mention people with bad eye sight. They really shouldn’t be shooting at anything that far away. If you can’t see you have no idea what is going on or who your shooting at that far away. And someone that far away from you poses no real threat to you. The only reason you should pull your gun is to protect your life or your family. If you have your gun on you at a mall and you pull it because you hear shots being fired. Once you pull your gun you are now a threat. No one knows who you are. You could be with the shooter. And just as quick as you might pull your gun. Someone else might pull there’s and shoot you. That’s why you don’t shoot at people from far away. They pose no threat to your life. Self defense is hard to prove in defending your life and your families. Do you really want to try to prove it in the defense of others. Putting optics on a handgun so you can be more accurate at distances is not self defense. If you do shoot someone at a distance they will use your own gun against you. Saying you set it up to shoot people far away. When I got my CCW we had to shoot at a target that was 3,5,and 7 yards away. That’s 9-feet 15-feet and 21-feet away I’m just guessing they didn’t pull those distances out of a hat. I’m guessing that might be the distance they see could be self defense any thing over that might be seen as sketchy. I’m just guessing but there’s reasons they do stuff. Now if your a police officer. Apples and oranges. We don’t play by the same rules. I would like to see one expert one professional shooter say you need an optic on your handgun so you can defend yourself in a self defense situation. It’s nice to have bells and whistles on our guns. But you really can’t say their there for self defense. All you really should have time for is point and shoot. I didn’t even know what that was till I took my first class. The instructor told us to point to a picture. Then he asked us how accurate do you think that is. Then he went on showing us how accurate it is. Then he went on telling us about muscle memory. Then after all that he ended it with saying people don’t stand still to get shot. The best way to hit what your shooting at is what everyone tells me. Practice Practice Practice. Having an optic or laser on your gun doesn’t mean your going to hit what you’re pointing at. The way you pull the trigger has a lot to do with what you hit. Please don’t take this the wrong way. In Illinois I have to retreat run away hide try anything I can to take my life out of danger and then only then can I pull and shoot. No stand your ground law here.

      Reply

  • John Yerby

    |

    What is the cost?,,,I have a 17 gen 4 and my wife has a 17 older model
    also what does the sight picture look like?

    Reply

  • Steve Williams

    |

    I like the idea! Do you know if Glock will modify the slide on my G19 for a fair price? If so i’m in. I have looked around and found some aftermarket slides machined for MOS but at over 500 dollars it’s not cost effective. Thanks, Steve

    Reply

    • V359

      |

      It cost about $100-$150 to have your Glock milled out to handle an electronic sight. Glockmeister and Glock Worx both do fine work. Some other individuals do as well. Actually drops the sight lower than the MOS version which is nice, but it also probably voids the warranty from the factory. Something worth checking. I’ve had Glocks milled by both companies and my Glocks are used daily and I have never had an issue.

      Reply

  • Scott M

    |

    I have been carrying a milled G26 and 19 since 2011. I carry the gun AIWB with little problem. I think Glock dropped the ball on the MOS. Milling the slide allows the optic to sit lower in the slide than the various plates allow.

    Reply

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