Camping & Survival

Survival—Asking the Tough Questions

Front of a card from the game Conflicted: The Survival Card Game

Most of us have heard or seen the movie Alive! about the true story of the Uruguay rugby team whose plane crashed in the Andes Mountains in 1972. Stranded for 72 days, survivors of the crash resorted to cannibalism of their dead teammates—some of them family members—for survival. After hearing the story or watching the movie for the first time, of course we all asked ourselves, “Could I do that? Could I eat another human being?” Pop culture has also helped Americans think about survival. Zombie movies and TV shows always depict an infected loved one. Characters torn between holding out for a cure and putting the infected out of their misery makes us wonder what we would do if faced with the situation. However, these sensationalized stories don’t get the majority of people talking or thinking about the hard-core questions. Questions such as, your once friendly and helpful neighbors are ill prepared and now you think they plan to rob you and your family, what will you do? Or, how will you handle the elderly, disabled or toddlers if your family has to bug-out? Many preppers worry about how to get their family, friends and neighbors involved in preparing for disasters and potential doomsday situations. Though I have personally never met a prepper who plans to be an island when the SHTF, those of us with plans also know those plans only include a select few. Our supplies can sustain for just so long.

Nearly desperate to help others help themselves; preppers discuss prepping with others. But how do you do that appropriately without seeming crazy or selfish? The zombie apocalypse discussion is tired, outdated and overplayed. None of my friends want to hear about that anymore. So, what else can you do? You can play Conflicted: The Survival Card Game.

Front of a card from the game Conflicted: The Survival Card Game
From basic questions to deep philosophical ones that force you to choose either survival or your morals, Conflicted is a must-have for preppers and survivalists.

Conflicted: The Survival Card Game is a thinking card game compromised of four separate decks of 52 cards each. An iPhone app is also available for $4.99. Each card has a different situation and question on it, prompting you and your group to discuss what you would do if faced with the problem.

The questions range from easy beginner questions such as, “Put the following resources in order of importance to you: food, water, shelter, weapons. If you could only pick three to bug out with what would they be and why?” to the really tough questions none of us find pleasant to have to think about.

Playing the game with others will:

  • Ensure non-preppers think about the importance of readiness.
  • Help you consider situations you hadn’t previously encountered.
  • Help your survivalist or prepper group discuss how to handle tough issues before they arise.
  • Extend your preparedness plan with your family.
  • Provide ways to discuss and think through difficult situations.
  • Make you focus on deciding when to pick survival over current morals.
  • Get everyone on the same page.
  • Find the loose cannons in your group.

I have read all 104 cards in decks 1 and 2 and let me tell you, some of the questions you will want to skip, because they are just too yucky to think about. However, those are the best ones. It isn’t going to be all wine and roses when TEOTWAWKI —best to get your head right now.

You can buy the game directly from the developer’s website for $14.99 a deck.

As a teaser, here is a question from the game. Share your answer in the comment section.

After hunting for game in the wilderness, two of your friends were bitten by the same kind of poisonous snake. You are the only one unharmed and with one vial of anti-venom antidote. Both of your friends have lost consciousness and they have their kids and wives waiting for their return, but you can save only one of them. A full dose of the antidote is needed in order to save a life, anything less would be just a waste. What criteria would you use to save one of them and why?

[suzanne]

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Comments (16)

  1. I’ll tell you this. Best friend or not. As a result of riding my bike in the morning for some exercise I have a definite list of dogs that would make a good meal. My dog wouldn’t make a good snack.
    I have sufficient weapons and ammo to outfit my kids should they come back. Supplies for a few months for the 4 of us. However after my kids anyone else would have to prove how their staying with me would benefit my survival. Eating human flesh…. well i’d eat a thigh long before I’d eat an insect.

  2. I’ve got no family. I doubt that I could eat my dog. He’s been the only friend I’ve had lately. But my roommate’s cat..no problem. More meat on her than my dog. Heck, even my roommate would be on the menu. Mmmm Long Pig..

  3. The facts that are evident by being stranded in the mountains cannot be planned for. What was done by the survivors, in my book was totally acceptable. If any blame can be brought, it would be not having emergency supplies on the plane, but, who can plan for an aircraft crashing. Even in the 70’s, air travel was relatively safe. The sacrifices made by all involved were extraordinary to say the least.

  4. 1851, Herman Melville’s novel Moby-Dick.

    Depend’s on what hardship’s and what your willing to do too survive. On 20 November 1820, 13-men got on a lifeboat. One died at sea and was buried at sea, seven were consumed and never buried…

  5. These kind of “you have to choose between friends or loved ones” questions are useless and stupid to waste ones time on. There are no good answers and will depend on many factors that there is no way to pre-plan for that lose -lose situation. The truth about this is that without knowing the scenario for which you are going to prep, you really can’t make a good decision and you probably won’t be ready for the real thing anyway. Having some basic gear on hand that will give you some flexibility in your immediate response is about the best you can do. From there you will need to be smart enough and resourceful enough to react to the circumstances. Human relationship skills, a willing to do what is necessary to survive (i.e defend your self intelligently), and the hands on skills necessary to obtain food, water and shelter will be the key. Next will be to have some kind of marketable skill or product that can used to trade for things you need. People who think that an arsenal of weapons and a well stocked bunker is the key to long term SHTF survival are sorely mistaken.

  6. I only have myself to worry about. Well that’s until the relatives that think prepping is stupid show up. I don’t keep pets any longer because unless properly trained they do not contribute to survival. I run scenarios through my head all the time to answer the hard questions as best I can until I come up with the answer I think I can live with. With the relatives I don’t need people that that do not contribute to survival and only serve to consume my supplies, have never touched a gun or gotten there hands dirty. Having said that I know that turning people away would not be easy.

  7. Easy enough for me I don’t place more value on my life than those of my family and friends. Dogs are sacred. After 5 bypasses, I’ll either go down swinging or meet my maker peacefully.

    1. Rob; You are right about dogs. They are your protectors and best friends. They love you unconditionally.

    2. Nuts. We have only two cats. They love us unconditionally too…..as long as they are fed every day.

  8. MY ANSWER TO WHICH OF MY FRIENDS I WOULD SAVE IF I HAD ONLY ONE VIAL OF ANTI-VENOM, WOULD DEPEND ON THE CHANCES OF ME GETTING BACK TO CAMP WITH OUT GETTING BITTEN MYSELF. IF THERE WERE MORE BACK AT CAMP AND I COULD MAKE IT THEN I WOULD MAKE A DECISION OF WHO WAS MORE VALUABLE TO THE REST OF THE GROUP. IF THERE WAS NO MORE ANTI-VENOM BACK AT CAMP AND I THOUGHT THAT I WOULD ABSOLUTELY NEED IT THEN I WOULD KEEP IT FOR MYSELF. IT’S CALL SURVIVAL! So your answer isn’t as simple as you would think.

  9. Well I only have my wife to worry about. And my cats would not make much of a meal but the neighboring ranchers cattle surer would (: Given it cam to that.

    On my property herds of Elk pass through with some frequency .And growing vegetables in my greenhouse is hobby of mine.

    1. You’re lucky to live in that kind of n environment. The ideal environment for survival, in fact.

      Most of us don’t. We live in an area with lots of wildlife and in a decent arrangement, but way too close to major population areas where there will be a LOT of unprepared and terrified people who will do anything to survive.

      And THAT’s the real challenge. A lot of prepper advice is to pack up and head for the wilderness when TSHTF, but that isn’t always as easy as it sounds. And what if it’s mid winter, or you have no place to actually go? Bug out bags and sturdy vehicles can help, but it’s still not going to be easy. Stock up on food, a means to provide pure water, take medical training and stock up on medical supplies, and most of all . . . have a plan.

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