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Robert Sadowski shooting the Walther PPS M2

Firearms

Range Report: Walther PPS M2 — Redefining Conceal Carry

Walther’s new PPS M2 is an excellent example of the refinement Walther brings to conceal carry pistols. The original PPS Classic ushered a 9mm conceal carry pistol that was thin, polymer framed with modular backstraps, and a striker fire trigger. The M2 does the Classic one better by using all the great features of the Classic and combining it with features found on the Walther PPQ series such as the ergonomic grip shape and grippy texture.

Caldwell Mag Charger with Magazine

General

Reload Your AR Magazines Fast Without Busting Your Thumbs

Loading AR magazines is a chore but it is one of the most important tasks when using an AR—busting thumbs is just part of the job. Range time is precious, and I don’t want to waste time loading 30-rounders when I can be training, so I have a plan that involves tools that take the work out of recharging AR magazines.

Uncategorized

FLIR One Converts Smart Phones Into Thermal Imaging Devices

Technology can make our lives easier and safer. Of all the things you stash in your go bag or bug-out kit the FLIR One thermal imaging device can help you detect potential issues in camp and keep you aware when others are using darkness as cover. You can have the advantage in darkness.

Battle Arms Development VERT stock folded

Gun Gear

AR DIY: Adding a Precision Sniper Stock

The right tools and a few minutes of times can drastically improve your AR’s ability to make a precision shot—especially at distance. Here is a review of Magpul’s PRS GEN3 and American Built Arms’ Urban Sniper Stock (USS)—two precision rifle stocks to up your AR’s game.

Firearms

Colt’s Competition-Ready Bloodline 

Colt’s ARs are going through a heretofore-unseen evolution of design modifications — many of them tricked-out for match competition by Colt Competition in in Breckenridge, Texas. Here’s an overview:

Red dot sights on a shooting target with a Ruger rimfire pistol

Gun Gear

Comparing Inexpensive Red Dot Sights

For the price of a state-of-the-art Aimpoint purchased in the 1980s, you could buy eight $50 red-dot sights today. The question many of us have is, how good are these inexpensive red dots? To see for myself, I compared three sights costing under $50— BSA Model RD30 ($19.99), NcStar DBB130 ($27.23), and the Tasco BKRD30 ($30.30). In addition, I added a potential ringer — a Bushnell TRS-25 ($80.72) — that cost nearly double the other sights, but is still affordable for most budgets.