Posts Tagged ‘.357 Magnum’

Colt .357 magnum revolver right profile

Range Report: The Colt .357

The revolver illustrated in these pages is a rare piece with only 15,000 made from 1951 to 1961. It is more rare than any Colt Python variation but doesn’t command the prices the snake guns do. Yet, the Colt .357 is perhaps as accurate as the Python and offers a shootable piece of history for less money than the snake guns.

Smith and Wesson 686 plus revolver with Speed Beez speedloader

Review: Smith and Wesson’s L Frame Magnum

Smith and Wesson’s 1935 .357 Magnum was introduced to a handgunning world far different than the one we live in today. Smith and Wesson .38 K frame revolvers, the Colt Army Special, and even the Colt Single Action Army were popular sidearms. The Smith and Wesson Triple Lock was the choice was many professional shooters.

Kimber K6s with a speedloader inserted into the cylinder

Review: Kimber K6s Revolver

As a professional writer, shooter, instructor, and teacher, I test many firearms. I realize the merits of each, although I have my own favorites. As long as the handgun is reliable, the piece has the necessary baseline for personal defense. Just the same, my personal defense handguns have changed little over the past 40 years. The 1911 .45, Smith and Wesson Combat Magnum .357, and Smith and Wesson snub-nosed .38 have been the mainstays of the battery.

Two Single Action Army Revolvers

Review: Traditions 1873 Sheriff — A Modern Sheriff’s Model

The Colt Single Action Army was introduced in 1873 after much development, and the addition of key features including a solid top strap and chambering for the .45 Colt cartridge—there have been other calibers. The original revolver was intended to give troopers an edge against aboriginal tribesman. One requirement was that the revolver be effective against Indian war ponies at 100 yards. However, civilians and lawmen needed a faster handling revolver. Something more handle-heavy than barrel-heavy, and which might be drawn quickly from a well-fitted holster was needed.

2 snubnose .38 revolvers with speed loaders

Snub Nose Magnum Revolvers — Unequivocal

With the great and growing abundance of concealed carry permits, as Americans exercise their rights and commons sense, and with a political climate that currently nurtures such progress, armed citizens are flexing their political muscles and choosing to be responsible for their own safety.

Two regular round and 2 expanded bullets

Range Report: OATH Ammunition

When choosing ammunition for personal defense there are many considerations. The balance of expansion and penetration must be maintained. Penetration must never be compromised. It remains the single most important terminal consideration.

Silver barreled-Taurus Track 637SS, barrel pointed to the right on a gray-and-white woven background.

Taurus Tracker .357 Magnum 7-shot: A New Baseline for Revolvers

When personal defense is the goal, the choice of firearms has a direct bearing on the success or failure of the mission. While mindset and training are vital, the firearm itself is material to the individual’s survival. The choice should be reliable, powerful enough for the task at hand and accurate enough to accomplish the mission. Reliability is an absolute, never to be compromised. Powerful enough begins with the .38 Special +P.

Smith and Wesson revolver with chamber open and wood grain grip, pointed downward on pale yellow background with partial wording showing.

Magnumitis: The .357 Magnum Cartridge

A Rifle on the Hip

You won’t find Magnumitis in the dictionary. The term, coined as a derisive nickname for the tendency of shooters to go for broke in the pursuit of power, simply implies a shooter who has succumbed to Magnumitis places power above accuracy.