Camping & Survival

Butcher Your Own Game

Mossberg Big Game Butcher Set

Mossberg Big Game Butcher Set
Mossberg Big Game Butcher Set

Hard to think about what went wrong. You did all your tracking, work, and preparation. You sighted in your rifle perfectly. You build your deer blind and put out your feed. You saw a trophy buck that makes the ones from hunting magazines look like greyhounds, and you put down a perfectly well placed shot. The deer dropped. Awesome! Well now, you have a problem. What do you need to turn your new kill into food? If you are the hard-nosed do it yourselfer like me, you need a butchering kit. The Mossberg Big Game Butcher Set has everything the field butcher needs, except the deer of course. Will this kit, you get full tang 420 stainless steel blades. These blades are of very good quality and will hold up over time. Make sure they stay razor-sharp with the included tungsten carbide sharpener. The Sure-grip rubber handles make it easy to maintain control while butchering. The hacksaw and shears are made of stainless steel too. To protect your kit, Mossberg included a hard-sided carrying case and a lifetime warranty. If you don’t like the idea of a stranger preparing your meat, or if it is in a survival situation, having your own butcher kit is perfect for turning large game into the best kind of home-grown dinner on earth.

Outdoor Edge K01N Kodi-Caper and Kodi-Skinner Knife Combo

Outdoor Edge K01N Kodi-Caper and Kodi-Skinner Knife Combo
Outdoor Edge K01N Kodi-Caper and Kodi-Skinner Knife Combo

Field dressing and skinning don’t have to be difficult. I learned to do it with nothing but a sharp folding knife and a rope. Thankfully, I’m all about adopting new techniques. The Kodi Caper and Skinner Knife Combo give you the right tools for the job, and at the highest quality. I hate few things more than struggling with a stubborn kill. This knife set definitely makes it easier on me from the get go. The gut hook blade is particularly useful. Many of the hunting knives you will see will come with a gut hook. You can use the gut hook blade by making a small incision with the main blade, then by using the hook to cut open the abdomen. The hook prevents the hunter from “paunching” the animal and possibly affecting the quality of the meat. Kodi designed the skinning knife to aid in the removal of the skin of big game animals. They tend to have highly sweeping blades that work to effortlessly separate the flesh from skin. A dedicated skinning knife can be a real time saver for those big game hunters that do the butchering themselves. An added bonus is that the skinning knife can do most of the other game cleaning chores as well as the clip point and drop point designs. The scalpel is perfect for smaller game, varmints, and intricate work through the organs. Kodi has done a fine job of making a difficult job, a little bit easier.

Gerber Ultimate Game Cleaning Kit

Gerber Ultimate Game Cleaning Kit
Gerber Ultimate Game Cleaning Kit

Gerber Ultimate Game Cleaning Kit is a complete deer field dressing kit for hunters. This kit includes a gut hook, bone saw, and clip point knife. Hunters of all kinds should consider the Gerber’s Ultimate Game Cleaning Kit. The Gerber kit has all the tools you need to be proficient at field dressing. The Gerber tool kit includes a Gerber E-Z Zip gut hook with replacement blades, the Gerber Exchange a Blade saw with two blades, and the Gerber Gator Serrater Clip Point Knife. A sheath decorated in Mossy Oak Break-Up camouflage keeps all these items in place. Hunters use the gut hook blade by making a small incision with the main blade, then by using the hook to cut open the abdomen. For great performance when field dressing game, a gut, or skinning hook is an ideal tool. The clip blade is a classic shape and very practical. Its name describes a shape that seems to have a portion of the spine of the blade clipped off. This brings the blade point lower for extra control and enhances the sharpness of the tip. It provides ample “belly” in the blade for slicing or skinning and a good tip for inserting in and under things that need to be cut. You will often find a false edge with the clip point.

The Mission of Cheaper Than Dirt!'s blog, The Shooter's Log, is to provide information—not opinions—to our customers and the shooting community. We want you, our readers, to be able to make informed decisions. The information provided here does not represent the views of Cheaper Than Dirt!

Comments (4)

  1. Ok guys, get a room. I hunted deer nearly 30 years. I had no one to teach me as my Dad died when I was 14, and had only watched him do it a few years. So, when I decided to hunt deer in my mid twenties, I bought several deer hunting annual magazines, and read and read and memorized all the photos, diagrams, and text I could get my hands on about field dressing because the first two or three years I didn’t have a place to hunt. I’d drive down to Ft. Hood Texas, south of Boomhower, the biggest army base in the world. They had what they called Pot Luck hunting, a pre-determined kill quota where they’d draw names out of a hopper at 3 am, and you had to be dressed, ready to board a troop carrier as soon as they drew your license with a corousponding number, then, they’d drive you out to an outlying srctor which hopefully wasn’t getting shelled by tankfire or other manuvers, put you on a stand, and you were on your own until 09:30 when you’d cease fire, and they’d come back by to pick up you and any deer, turkey, or bobcat, or mountain lion you may have on the ground for a long dusty ride back to the check station/walkin freezer at the Rod & Gun club there on base, where you’d camp in your vehicle in the gravel parking lot. There’de be 6 to 8 hunters per truck, a 3/4 ton 4wd camo Dodge Powerwagon with benches down both side of the canvas covered bed. Imagine six or seven other hunters who just met, riding maybe 5 miles out, maybe 40 miles out and coming back with a deer or 8 deer and or the other aforementioned game piled on your feet in the back of the truck. And you’d better know how to field dress your kill, the guys the guide who put you on stand, and the military driv er would be the first to see and congratulate you. Then, when you get back, all the deer would be weighed, measured, and examined thoroughly, and documented, so your handiwork would show. Or lack of it. Anyway, that’s how I learned and got started. That first year I paid to have mine butchered. I say mine, you really don’t know who’s meat or which parts you get back. After that first year I did it all, and sometimes I’d have 3 and 4 to butcher in one day. Metal dish pans and an old beer/water melon fridge on the porch help a lot. Also, lots of butcher paper and freezer tape and permanent markers for cuts of meat, dates, number of pieces, etc. It also helps to have a hot wife to help. And she can cook it up too. Yeah, don’t get some expensive kit from Cabelas or somewhere with one or two knives you’ll use and 8 more things you won’t. And don’t get camo stuff either, you’ll never find it. A good drop point and sharp finger for field dressing, and a large fixed blade or small ax for breaking the pelvis, a small saw of any kind for taking the legs off, get some direction, develope your style and speed, and happy hunting.

  2. you’re in reality a good webmaster. The web site loading speed is incredible. It sort of feels that you are doing any distinctive trick. Also, The contents are masterwork. you have performed a wonderful activity in this topic!

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Time limit exceeded. Please click the reload button and complete the captcha once again.

Your discussions, feedback and comments are welcome here as long as they are relevant and insightful. Please be respectful of others. We reserve the right to edit as appropriate, delete profane, harassing, abusive and spam comments or posts, and block repeat offenders. All comments are held for moderation and will appear after approval.