Posts Tagged ‘CCI Ammo’

Thompson Center Contender handgun left on groundhog paper target

Review: Thompson Contender — The Specialist’s Handgun

Among the most interesting of hobbies is the pursuit of accuracy. Some handguns have it and some do not—the level of accuracy varies widely. I have often mentioned that I do not own a machine rest as I prefer to keep in touch with reality. I do own a couple of devices that help me shoot well such as the Bull Shooters pistol rest.

CCI's Maxi Mag +V ammunition with Henry Octagon Pump rifle and target

Range Report: The Gallery Gun Reimagined: Henry’s Pump Octagon

The pump action is as American as a gun design gets. While most prolific in just about every modern shotgun, pump-action rifles were, and are still, out there. One of the most prolific was the old Winchester Model 1890 that came in a number of .22 caliber rimfire chamberings. Once synonymous with shooting galleries and small game getting for decades, the pump .22 has fallen by the wayside.

Kel-Tec CMR 30 rifle right with wood background

Range Report: Kel Tec CMR 30

A few years ago, Kel-Tec introduced the PMR 30 .22 Magnum pistol. The company is known for affordable innovation and performance, and this pistol was no exception. With good accuracy, light weight, and a 30-round magazine capacity, this handgun became the ultimate rimfire plinker. As an outdoorsman’s pistol for hunting and pest control, the PMR 30 is a great piece. Kel-Tec has now followed up with the carbine version, the CMR 30.

Woman with pink ear muffs shooting a Glock handgun

Personal Defense With Limits — Caliber Selection

Personal Defense With Limits

When discussing handguns for personal defense there are arguments put forward that are at odds with the reality I have observed. After several years of university study, and 30 years as an armed professional, I have a rather confined idea of realism. I look for vetted information and demand an internal consistency from experiments and data. I feel that my conclusions are valid.

Some things just say DON'T PLAY WITH ME

Snakes

Guest post by Ed Head, contributor for Shooting Gallery, Gun Stories and Down Range TV.

“Snakes. Why did it have to be snakes?” — Indiana Jones

Indiana Jones and I have something in common—we don’t like snakes.

A black Ruger .22/45, barrel pointed down, with 2 boxes of ammunition against a wooden background.

Why Buy the .22 Long Rifle Cartridge?

A proven resource in creating a marksman is the use of inexpensive .22 caliber ammunition and .22 caliber firearms. The rimfire offers little or no recoil, minimal report and good accuracy. It is recognized that the rimfire is a good training aid for pure marksmanship, that is trigger control and learning sight alignment and sight picture. In today’s tight economy, we see both .22 caliber conversions and dedicated .22 caliber firearms pressed into service in training. With the high, and increasing, costs of training, .22 caliber conversion units and .22 caliber firearms appear to be a good buy.

1908 Steyr-Pieper .32 tip-barrel pistol

“Amazing penetration and striking power!”

This marketing slogan of the early 1900s described pistols chambered in the lowly .32 ACP cartridge. The guns were touted as being good for everything from home defense to assassinating important persons to self-defense against brown bear. To the modern reader, such claims appear outrageous, but why were they taken seriously back then? The rounds that 32ACP superseded were mainly the black powder .320 revolver cartridges loaded with lead round nose bullets. 80 grain unjacketed bullet at about 550fps lacked penetration and typically did not expand. Five or six of those from a revolver were rather less likely to end a fight than eight jacketed pistol bullets propelled by smokeless powder at 900fps. Neither round would equal the performance of .38 Automatic or similar, but then neither would the larger guns fit pockets, whereas the .32 could. Note that neither the higher velocity nor the greater penetration were at all significant for target shooting, so the Olympic pistols use .32 S&W Long even today.