Author Archive

Glen Zediker

Glen Zediker is the owner of Zediker Publishing, and specializes in books and other publications focused primarily on AR-15s and Handloading. Glen has worked professionally with some of the greatest shooters on the planet, as well as leading industry "insiders." And he does pretty well on his own: Glen is a card-carrying NRA High Master and earned that classification in NRA High Power Rifle using an AR-15 Service Rifle. Visit http://www.ZedikerPublishing.com and learn more, plus articles for download.
Bravo Company AR-15 bolt

AR-15 Tech: Bolts

Those looking to go “premium” when building or finishing an AR-15 often look at an upgraded bolt carrier group. The primary functioning part in that group is the bolt assembly. The carrier body, as long as it is true USGI-standard specification, will give reliable and correct service. Sure, plated premium carriers are nice, mostly because they clean up much easier. Likewise, a higher-dollar carrier won’t make or break your gun, but a sub-standard bolt might.

Saturn M4 feed ramp for AR-15 rifle

Figuring Out Feed Ramps

Given that most of us don’t always have perfect access to truly “genuine” mil-spec, mil-standard parts (those actually used in issued fighting tools), we’re shopping based on a little part trust and a bigger part knowledge. The trust part is accepting claims of “USGI-spec” parts actually being done to not only blueprint dimensions, but also made from the correct materials treated to the same processes. That’s receivers, bolts, and on down the list of the 100 or so parts that can make up an AR-15.

Here’s the original, the MKII by Charlie Milazzo. A long-time competition M1A builder, Charlie figured out how to do the two-stage for the AR-platform. Look closely at the illustrations and see how sear engagement changes from first stage to second stage. There’s a whopping lot of sear engagement prior to initiating the pull though the first stage, and a very “crisp” break from minimum engagement waiting after the bump when the first stage has ended. In a single-stage, such minimal engagement is necessary to get a crispy break, but it’s not as safe because it’s minimal from the get-go. In a true two-stage, releasing back through the first stage take-up also returns sear engagement to where it was. Another minor point, with major influence, is that since sear engagement returns to its formerly generous self after a shot, there’s not going to be any “tripping” of the sear as there can be with a single-stage that’s adjusted to a light weight. This can happen from the shock of bolt carrier assembly inertia. For this reason, it’s possible to attain a lower actual break weight with a two-stage. Photo by Glen Zediker © 2015.

Throwback Thursday: AR-15 Two-Stage Triggers

In my estimation, a two-stage trigger in any rifle offers the most secure, precise, and safest function. Two-stage triggers appeared in U.S.-issue service rifles, such as the 1903, M1, M14. But for the AR-15/M16, it took the civilian-side aftermarket to create the two-stage trigger. The main reason other military-use rifles carried two-stage triggers is, primarily, because they are safer. There are other attributes to discuss, but safety is the main point in favor of a two-stage.

roll pins should be just below the surface

AR-15 Maintenance: Roll Pins

AR-15s are pretty much pinned together. While a staple for many AR-15s, roll pins are not hard to work with, but a misstep could be catastrophic enough to permanently damage your AR-15. Here’s how to perform the essential construction operations associated with roll pins—the professional way.

Gas rings on an AR-15 rifle

Six Troubleshooting Solutions for AR-15 Function

When something goes wrong and the rifle won’t fire, the first question should always be, “What changed?” Before answering that, we have to determine—or at least I determine—whether we’re talking about a “fresh” rifle going through its shakedown period, or a (previously) trusted gun that’s suddenly decided to stop running. If it’s the first scenario, there’s a longer list of possibilities that include original parts, conditions, and installation quality. This article will focus on the previously-functioning rifle that’s taken a vacation from operation.

AR-15 with SOCOM Boom Tube stock

AR-15 Carbine Configuration

Don’t short-change a short gun! When you spec a carbine, think about shooting it! Simple? Yes. But don’t adapt to the carbine; make it adapt to you. Here are a few thoughts on how to get the most utility from your carbine.

Brass rifle cartridge cases

Reloading 101: The Cartridge Case

Bear with me! We’ll get started on the process of handloading next time when I talk about setting up a sizing die. But before that, it’s good to keep in mind what we’re dealing with, and that is a cartridge case, and also what happens to it during firing, which is what we’re setting out to remedy when we reuse it.