Consumer Information

Ruger SR22 Pistol Product Safety Bulletin

Black polymer frame, blued steel barrel TALO Exclusive Ruger SR22 semiautomatic pistol

In rare instances, if the left and right frame inserts of Ruger SR22 pistols are not properly secured together, the firing pin blocker lifter and hammer block can move independently of each other, potentially rendering them ineffective. If this situation occurs, the pistol will intermittently exhibit a “slack” single-action trigger and has the potential to discharge if decocked over a live round.

Note: A “slack” single-action trigger occurs if, while operating the pistol in single-action mode with a magazine inserted, the slide forward, and the manual safety disengaged, a trigger pull does not encounter resistance and the hammer does not fall.

Although only a very small number of pistols appear to be affected, Ruger is committed to safety and would like to examine all SR22 pistols that have ever exhibited a slack single-action trigger or discharged upon decocking. If you experienced either condition, please immediately stop using your SR22 and return it to Ruger for this Safety Retrofit. If you have not experienced either condition, your pistol is not subject to this Safety Bulletin unless one or both of these conditions occur in the future. Further details are available at Ruger.com/SR22Retrofit.

Please read the full release from Ruger and take any necessary actions to ensure you and those around you have a safe day at the range!

If you have any questions regarding this Safety Bulletin, please review the FAQs at Ruger.com/SR22Retrofit or contact Ruger Customer Service at 336-949-5200.

About the Author:

Alex Cole

Alex is a relatively young firearms enthusiast who’s been shooting consistently for around seven years. Though he is fairly new to the industry, he loves consuming all information related to guns and is constantly trying to enhance his knowledge, understanding and use of firearms. Not a day goes by where he doesn’t do something firearms-related.

Alex tries to visit the range at least a couple of times a month to maintain and improve his shooting skills. He also enjoys disassembling and reassembling firearms to see how they work and to keep them properly cleaned and maintained. He installs most of the upgrades to his firearms himself, taking it as a chance to learn.

Additionally, he is very into buying, selling and trading guns to test different firearms and learn more about them. He is not only interested in modern handguns and rifles, he appreciates the classics for both historical value and real-world use.
The Mission of Cheaper Than Dirt!'s blog, The Shooter's Log, is to provide information—not opinions—to our customers and the shooting community. We want you, our readers, to be able to make informed decisions. The information provided here does not represent the views of Cheaper Than Dirt!

Comments (4)

  1. Thanks for the heads up. Immediately checked mine purchased in 2018, we’re GTG. A nice solid little pistol from Ruger.

  2. I think the SR22 was released in 2012. Not really a new firearm. Ruger has always done things their way and have produced fine firearms. Some might think every pistol should resemble the plastic wonder pistols that are everywhere. Some folks still enjoy the option of buying traditional pistol designs. That is the area where Ruger excels.

  3. My friend had a faulty PCC. About every 30 or 40 rounds it would allow a full auto effect. He did not contact the mfg.

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