Firearms

Review: Taurus TH10 — The Latest 10mm Double/Single Action

Taurus TH10 10mm semi-automatic handgun with a box of PMC Bronze ammo

I’m predicting this year will become, among other things, the year of the 10mm. Why? To fill the gap left by the .40 S&W, which has basically been abandoned. Springfield introduced a 10mm version of the XDm in 2018. Last year, S&W came out with a 10mm version of its ever-popular M&P full-size pistol. Now, Taurus has joined the ranks with a 10mm version of its TH hammer-fired line. I can’t wait to see who else joins the ranks of 10mm producers.

Performance between the 10mm and the .40 S&W is not that different. I compared three popular brands just to see. Here’s what I found.

Taurus TH10 10mm semi-automatic pistol
The Taurus TH10 is an ambidextrous, full-sized, hammer-fired pistol that represents the 10mm market.

10mm Performance

The .40 S&W Federal Punch 165-grain JHP boasts a muzzle velocity of 1,130 feet per second resulting in a muzzle energy of 468 foot pounds. The 10mm version of Federal Punch is heavier at 200 grains, but performance is similar. Federal claims 1,100 feet per second, and because the bullet is a little heavier, it produces muzzle energy of 537 foot pounds.

The other two brands I chose to compare were of the same bullet weight, so similar performance is advertised by the manufacturer (Defender vs. White Box). The Winchester Defender 180-grain JHP shows 1,025 feet per second with 420 foot pounds of muzzle energy for its .40 S&W cartridge. The 10mm 180-grain JHP cartridge advertises 1,240 feet per second with 614 pounds of muzzle energy.

Winchester White Box 180 offers 1,010 feet per second with 408 foot pounds muzzle energy for the .40 S&W, and 1,080 feet per second with 466 foot pounds of muzzle energy for 10mm. Yes, the 10mm is slightly more powerful than the .40 S&W, but not there’s not so much difference that it doesn’t make a good gap filler between the 9mm and the .45 ACP.

But what about recoil? Wasn’t recoil the big reason for abandoning the .40 S&W for the 9mm? Obviously, the 10mm has a little more punch than the 9mm, but if you are man or woman enough to handle a .45 ACP, you might find the 10mm just a little less jolting in the recoil department. I’ll tell you that at 76 years old with advanced arthritis, I’m recoil sensitive. However, I don’t cringe whenever it comes time to shoot one of my 10mm handguns.

Taurus TH10 Features

I’m glad Taurus chose to introduce the 10mm to the TH line of pistols. Its hammer-fired double/single action line of pistols doesn’t get much publicity. However, they exist in all the major calibers with some color offerings and in sizes that compare with the corresponding striker-fired pistols. There is something to be said for a personal defense gun that has a double-action pull for the first shot with single-action follow-up shots.

Taurus TH10 10mm semi-automatic handgun, spare magazines, magazine loader, and lockable plastic carrying case
The Taurus TH10 ships in a lockable plastic case with two magazines, two additional backstraps, and a magazine loader.

The 10mm pistol I tested had a first-shot trigger pull that exceeded the 12-pound limit of my trigger pull gauge; yet, it was not uncomfortable. The single-action pull was nice at just over five pounds. Let’s look at the overall pistol design.

The size and weight of this pistol is almost the same as the TS9 I recently reviewed. The same is true of the ‘older’ 24/7 DS that I began my concealed carry journey with. The overall length is 7.8 inches, height is 5.8 inches, and width is 1.43 inches. The barrel length is 4.25 inches and weight is 28.5 ounces (empty).

Magazine capacity is 15 rounds. So, it’s a full-size gun, which is helpful when it comes to mitigating the recoil effects from such a powerful cartridge. I’ve successfully carried guns of this size in an IWB holster worn at the three o’clock position on my waist, and with the right holster and belt combination, it is not uncomfortable.

Taurus TH10 10mm semi-automatic gun in a leather IWB holster
The TH10 fit comfortably in holsters designed to fit other full-size Taurus pistols, such as the 24/7 and the TS9. This is a Bullard IWB holster.

One thing that many shooters will like about this gun is that it is fully ambidextrous. All vital controls exist on both sides of the gun. One control many may not be familiar with is the decocker, which shares duties with the thumb safety. Press it up and the safety is on, press it down and the hammer drops without firing a round. This occurs because the firing pin is blocked from going forward when the decocker is activated.

The slide lock is further back on the TH series than on a lot of guns, and I like that because it makes it easy to reach. It is relatively small but has an interesting design that makes it easy to operate. There is a ridge in the middle that provides your thumb with enough leverage to push the slide lock up or down. Down actually has a little advantage because the top side of the lever is ridged.

I’d loved to have had a chance to sit down with the designers. To me, pushing up needs the extra assist. I could care less about pushing it down because I sling shot my slide forward, rather than pushing the slide lock down. The safety/decocker has the same design. Both are easy to manipulate.

Fieldstripped Taurus TH10 10mm semi-automatic handgun
Takedown is standard Taurus — two sliding buttons just ahead of the trigger guard that you pull down to allow the slide to move slightly forward and lift off.

The mag release isn’t as easy to operate, however, it’s just a button that I find it hard to press to drop a magazine. Maybe it will loosen up some with time, but as of this writing — even after a couple hundred rounds through the gun — I have to grab something hard to push the button and release the mag. I am concerned that it wouldn’t work well if I had to reload during a gunfight. However, I’m confident that real gunfighters who would be using this gun most likely have stronger thumbs than mine. As for me, if 16 rounds isn’t enough to settle any confrontation I might have, well it might be my time to go.

Sights on the gun consist of a bright, white dot in front with a black rear sight. Both are drift adjustable. Racking serrations on the slide are only on the back but are deep enough that I found slide operation to not be a problem at all. On a hammer-fired gun, I cock the hammer to take tension off the slide before manipulating it.

The trigger guard is large enough to operate the pistol with gloves. The trigger guard is elevated in back to allow a high grip. The grip surface is textured all around, and there are small finger grooves on the front strap. As we’ve come to expect, the TH10 ships with three different backstrap inserts that allow you to fit the grip to your hand size. The trigger is curved with a wide, flat front surface.

Taurus’ signature grooves for the thumb, and a resting place for the tip of the index finger, exist on both sides of the frame. The TH10 features a two-slot Picatinny rail on the dust cover for accessories. The hammer is almost bobbed to help with concealment but still has enough surface area showing for you to cock the gun, should you desire. That helps during dry fire practice (you don’t have to rack the slide each time to cock the gun.)

Range Testing

Prior to writing this, I’ve had the gun on two range trips, personally shooting maybe 50 rounds each trip. I shared the experience with a shooting buddy who shot approximately the same number of rounds. On the first trip, I had two failures to feed, both with Winchester Silver Tip. I found this interesting. For years, I’ve used Silver Tip as a break-in ammo because the iron oxide, silver coating on the bullet works as a lubricant. No issues existed with several other brands we shot, and the other shooter didn’t experience any issues.

Taurus TH10 10mm semi-automatic pistol with Lyman trigger pull gauge
Double-action trigger pull is slightly over the 12-pound limit on the author’s gauge, but smooth. Single-action trigger pull is slightly over five pounds.

We did most of our shooting at five and seven yards and were rewarded with the ability to put all our rounds within the five-inch circle representing our targets — most of the time. Sure, there was the occasional flyer, but we blamed that on the shooter, not the gun.

The overall assessment was that this is a gun that would do you well for personal or home defense. The MSRP is currently $530, so we’ll likely be seeing it for under $500.

Do or would you employ the 10mm for personal or home defense? What arguments do you make against the 10mm for either of these roles? How do you think the Taurus TH10 will perform? Share your answers in the Comment section.

  • Taurus TH10 10mm semi-automatic, right profile with Taurus baseball cap
  • Taurus TH10 10mm semi-automatic handgun with a box of PMC Bronze ammo
  • Taurus TH10 10mm semi-automatic pistol with Lyman trigger pull gauge
  • Taurus TH10 10mm semi-automatic gun in a leather IWB holster
  • Taurus TH10 10mm semi-automatic handgun, spare magazines, magazine loader, and lockable plastic carrying case
  • Taurus TH10 10mm semi-automatic pistol
  • Fieldstripped Taurus TH10 10mm semi-automatic handgun
  • Taurus TH10 10mm semi-automatic pistol, left profile

About the Author:

David Freeman

David is an NRA Instructor in pistol, rifle and shotgun, a Chief Range Safety Officer and is certified by the State of Texas to teach the Texas License to Carry Course and the Hunter Education Course. He has also owned and operated a gun store. David's passion is to pass along knowledge and information to help shooters of all ages and experience levels enjoy shooting sports and have the confidence to protect their homes and persons. He flew medevac helicopters in Vietnam and worked for many years as a corporate pilot before becoming actively involved in the firearm industry.
The Mission of Cheaper Than Dirt!'s blog, The Shooter's Log, is to provide information—not opinions—to our customers and the shooting community. We want you, our readers, to be able to make informed decisions. The information provided here does not represent the views of Cheaper Than Dirt!

Comments (23)

  1. I’ve carried 10mm, .45 and 9mm as EDC since about 1990. Mostly Glocks in the large calibers because they fit my large hands so well. They all have their drawbacks and advantages. My gripe is with Taurus. It’s just my personal experience, but I’ve had zero luck with them when I’ve succumbed to the low price point (and that “advantage” has disappeared for the most part). I’ve also had friends buy Taurus revolvers and autos and they have a shocking number of flaws out of the box and problems seem to crop up after with alarming regularity .
    I’ve recently been searching for a reliable 357/38 full size revolver for specific application for a relative. To me the price difference between Taurus compared to known quality Ruger or S&W is just not enough to justify the experiences of dubious reliability of Taurus products that I’ve experienced.

  2. Save the 9’s = 10’s and 45’s for backup. Double barrel 2/34 12ga with #4 steel shot will fill doorway or hallway just fine. Now you have time to put your slippers on LoL

  3. Peteinalaska, great comment, and thank you for sharing your experience. I look forward to your thoughts on the Taurus! I have the same web/finger problem as you with Glocks (and others), for some reason recoil beats up my middle finger, right at the second joint, and like you, 1911s point the most accurately for me. To test the natural point, for me, I will look at a target, pistol pointing down, and close my eyes and try to point at the target naturally. 1911 is right on; M&P 2.0 is high; Glock is way high. I am sure this has to do with grip angle.

  4. I have used and carried the !0mm since I acquired my fist Bren Ten in late 1984. This platform was followed by a Delta Elite 10mm which served me for many years. As a backup system I have used, carried, and maintained a ParaOrdence P-14in .45ACP (1911 design) since it was introduced.
    over the years I have used various other 10mm platform’s but never changed from the Delta Elite as my EDC.
    Glock has never been an option for me as its ergonomics concerning the web of my hands between thumb and pointing finger find the Glock frame to be to squared and sharp causing discomfort after several shots fired. So, Glocks in general and the 10mm, Glock 20 specifically are a no go for me. this brought me to the Springfield XD an XDm series of pistoles that i found very comfortable, intuitive, accurate and well designed. In the early years the only missing link in their (Springfield Armory) lineup of platforms was a 10mm. And so we waited until they introduced the XDm in 10mm with a 5.25″ barrel in 2018. i acquired one shortly after introduction, retiring my Delta Elite from EDC. this XDm platform has never had a service problem or malfunction since it came out of the box. I missed the feel and mussel memory of a 1911 but the transition was not long or required learning a different grip having also carried my ParaOrdance P-14 (Double stack in .45) for so long. only the weight difference of the XDm took some getting used to.
    In 2020 I was able to procure the new Springfield 1911 Ronin in 10mm. Its a pleasant platform to carry and has a the attributes that one expects from Springfield Armory products.
    I placed an order of this Taurus TH10 and look forward to its arrival. There were several reasons in my opinion to give it a look … double action, overall size and cost. as a backup, or secondary platform it may find a use for me. that its a 10mm means not having to carry multi types of munitions.
    may also be a good platform for those just getting acquainted with the 10mm. I would also suggest the offerings from Rock Island Armory (RIA) in their 1911 TAC platforms chambered in 10mm. RIA is also a solid choice if one is looking to get an entry level 1911 in .45 for their collection.

    I have been a firm end user of the 10mm chambering since its inception and see no reason to change that position. it is NOT an unmanageable cartridge in any way. its recoil is by no means as difficult to control or as uncomfortable as those in the FBI purported it to be. I believe that their report was designed to provide a basis for a new platform and caliber without looking as if they overreacted in the first place and just jumped at a more powerful cartridge in response to the Florida Incident. The FBI report in my opinion is misleading and unduly highlights non existent “down sides”. What ever… the 10 mm exists today, is now chambered in an increasing number of platforms and shows a broad spectrum of end users. Thats all that counts really.
    we shall see how this new Taurus stacks up!

  5. Everybody is talking about fps and psi and all the different cal. that are available ,that’s all well and good but when it comes time for me to be in any kind of a fire fight the only thing on my mind will be how many times im I going to have to shoot this a-hole before he goes down. I’m not thinking about over penetration when some clown may be taking aim at you, over penetration is the last thing on you mind believe me I’ve been there on more than once.Carrie what ever you feel safe with and go to the range burn up a box or two the more you shoot the more you may want to upgrade to something else, But whatever you decide on shoot shoot shoot practice always.

  6. Revisiting my earlier remark about DECIBEL LEVEL and Robert’s comment about being awakened in a “groggy state”: certainly the 10mm is powerful, but there’s a difference between being at the range with hearing and eye protection vs. being roused from your sleep to defend yourself. Would / could you reach for hearing protection in that scenario? Fine if you have a suppressor mounted. But if you don’t, the high decibel level ( and muzzle flash ) on firing could impair the shooter.
    Also, back to OVER-PENETRATION: searching the web you’ll finds lots of opinions and anecdotes but scant little hard data analysis.
    One reason may be the variability of different scenarios of:
    – penetrating interior walls ( projectiles putting other occupants within that structure at risk ).
    – penetrating exterior walls ( projectiles exiting the structure ).
    – penetrating windows.
    You may wish to factor these variables into your selection of firearm and its deployment.

  7. I thought about buying a 10mm pistol for several years and then ran across the 460 Rowland. I never looked back at the 10mm since. I converted an FNX45 to take the higher pressures of the 460 Rowland and it is my go everywhere do everything handgun now. With 16 rounds on tap at close to 1000fpe per round that adds up to 16000fpe per clip. Since this gun shoots more like a 9mm with the comp in place it is very controllable and easy to shoot. I carry it in a tanker holster since it weighs in at 49 oz. but with this rig I find it very comfortable to carry. Best back country system I’ve ever carried.

  8. Thank you for your review. I purchased a TH-40C last year. The magazine release is extremely difficult to operate from either side. I have to really crank down on it to get it to move. It would appear to me now that the entire TH series has a similar issue. I have tried applying a small amount of lubrication (oil, not jeweler’s rouge) with no improvement. I also own an HK USP 40 and an FNX-40 and both have ambi magazine release features and neither one takes nearly the same amount of effort as the TH-40C. (HK has a different method of activation though…). I believe that Taurus may need to revisit their magazine release design on this series of pistol. It should NOT be this hard to activate right out of the box, and need 50 to 100 magazine changes to begin to get better.
    It also seems to me that I recall the FBI moved from the 10mm to the .40 due to the “robustness” of the round being judged as too much for even their male community. And they moved from the .40 to the 9mm for yet a different reason than that but I am having trouble remembering why exactly. Perhaps cost of ammunition or overall size of the pistols and increased capacity available with 9mm for a given physical size of pistol.

  9. Okay. Here is an opinion from a range shooter of 15+ years. A 10 mm is NOT for everybody. After I shoot 50-100 rounds of 10 mm, your hand will definitely feel it. This is a powerful cartridge. If you are a hiker or hunter and need this for protection in the woods, this is your gun. To really get the true impact of this cartridge you need to shoot a one gallon milk jug in a junk yard setting. I only have one 10 mm in my collection. Its a Sig Sauer Master Stainless Elite 5″.I rotate it into my collection and shoot it 2 to 3 times a year.

  10. I have a 1911 in 45 ACP, and a 1911 in 10mm. Your statement that they have the same recoil is off. The 10mm has considerably more recoil. I like shooting both. The 10 is a bad a$$ round. True that the 10 is a man’s gun, not for the limp wrist lol

  11. Robert and GG said it best. Weak 10mm might as well be 45acp+P or 40mm. The 10mm round was designed with power in mind. It is fitting for both carry and home defense, in a full size configuration. Choose underwood/buff bore or the others and get 700-800 FPE. As always, shot placement is key and if you are worried about your round exiting your house, a 9mm will pass through the window and keep going. Bottom line here is if you select 10mm go with the higher loadings else why carry the heavier/larger piece to begin with? Also no, 10mm is a decent round with the higher loadings but it sure isn’t too much. Have carried 454 full loads in revolvers (1900+ FPE) and that is a heavy load for sure. 10mm is a good choice for those who can easily handle it.

  12. Finally, an affordable 10mm with the features I personally really like! I really like a decocker because it as safely as reasonably possible is a way to carry “cocked and locked” without stressing springs. I really like a hammer because it allows me to manually cock and go to single action trigger when I think I have time. Last, and pretty important, I require a manual safety. I know (I think) all the arguments that Glocks are entirely safe and yet how many tales of “Glock leg” exist — where the carrier shoots themselves in the leg while holstering. Wonderful features in the Taurus not generally available until you go to far more expensive guns.
    Accuracy might be a bit better.
    I suspect that the magazine release issue might be addressed with either a clipped spring or a slight dose of jeweler’s rouge and manipulation.
    Are there plans for a custom shop gun offering better accuracy? And, maybe a flat trigger?
    By the way, what settles for me the debate between 9mm and 10mm is the fact that 9mm is considered too weak to be an effective hunting round for deer but the 10 isn’t; and, minimum energy requirements for a combat rifle or carbine are 1,000 ft/# of energy and the entry level 9mm is less than 300 ft/# where are the 10 often hits 600 or better with decent ammo. I think a 200 # meth addict is probably tougher to stop than an 90 # black tail deer.
    Everybody talks about over penetration. To me, that is like the prospect of a car accident. I am not going to stay home and not drive because of the remote possibility of a car accident. Similarly, I am not going to carry what I consider an under powered, or lacking in energy and effectiveness, defensive round on the off chance it will penetrate too much and hurt someone other than the intended target. My choice is to pack the higher energy round hoping for a more effective fight ender then worry about the nearly non-existent off chance of some over penetration that just goes on to hit an unintended target. My choice, make your own. But I hear concern about over penetration frequently and almost never can find an incident of it happening.

  13. Finally, an affordable 10mm with the features I personally really like! I really like a decocker because it as safely as reasonably possible is a way to carry “cocked and locked” without stressing springs. I really like a hammer because it allows me to manually cock and go to single action trigger when I think I have time. Last, and pretty important, I require a manual safety. I know (I think) all the arguments that Glocks are entirely safe and yet how many tales of “Glock leg” exist — where the carrier shoots themselves in the leg while holstering. Wonderful features in the Taurus not generally available until you go to far more expensive guns.
    Accuracy might be a bit better.
    I suspect that the magazine release issue might be addressed with either a clipped spring or a slight dose of jeweler’s rouge and manipulation.
    Are there plans for a custom shop gun offering better accuracy? And, maybe a flat trigger?
    By the way, what settles for me the debate between 9mm and 10mm is the fact that 9mm is considered too weak to be an effective hunting round for deer but the 10 isn’t; and, minimum energy requirements for a combat rifle or carbine are 1,000 ft/# of energy and the entry level 9mm is less than 300 ft/# where are the 10 often hits 600 or better with decent ammo. I think a 200 # meth addict is probably tougher to stop than an 90 # black tail deer.
    Everybody talks about over penetration. To me, that is like the prospect of a car accident. I am not going to stay home and not drive because of the remote possibility of a car accident. Similarly, I am not going to carry what I consider an under powered, or lacking in energy and effectiveness, defensive round on the off chance it will penetrate too much and hurt someone other than the intended target. My choice is to pack the higher energy round hoping for a more effective fight ender then worry about the nearly non-existent off chance of some over penetration that just goes on to hit an unintended target. My choice, make your own. But I hear concern about over penetration frequently and almost never can find an incident of it happening.

  14. The corollary to Robert Ruark’s “Use enough gun” is “Use enough gun, but not too much gun.”
    Find the gun that works for YOU and for YOUR situation.
    A 10mm pistol need not be accompanied with a cautionary note of “He-Men only…”. But clearly it is a more demanding arrangement of gun and cartridge compared to smaller calibers.
    And RG Grimm’s comment meshes with the “YOUR situation” point. In a densely populated urban or suburban setting, over-penetration is a serious concern, in which nearby residents might be unintentionally harmed or killed by a stray bullet. And the legal consequences for the shooter of such an outcome would also be horrific.
    Conversely, if you live out in the boonies, with no neighbors for miles around, where the only collateral damage might be a local chipmunk, then enjoy your 10mm.
    Lastly, one point that is rarely mentioned is the DECIBEL LEVEL produced by a fired round, and the potentially disorienting effect on the shooter. The bigger the caliber, the louder the bang. Height and muscle mass have no relationship to tender eardrums. So it seems wise to factor in that consideration when selecting your weapon ( and yes, I am aware of Suppressors ).

  15. The comment sections of most 10mm handgun reviews turn into referendums of the cartridge instead of the gun. 10mm is a highly effective round. It is the most powerful of the widely available and practical auto-loading pistol cartridges. If you’re small, inexperienced, and/or poor, buy a 9mm; it is also a great round. If you’re large and/or experienced and willing to accept the price of ammo, then go ahead and get the punchiest projectile you can comfortably handle. For me, that’s the 10mm. Personally, I’m shooting at something, its because I want it dead, and it will be deader faster if I’m shooting a 10mm vs a 9mm or 380. Now, that may not be true for you: I’m 6’2″, very muscular, and I shot probably 5,000 rounds per year. If you think 10mm is too powerful, you might be right. 10mm is a big boy’s caliber. I wouldn’t recommend a 10mm for a small or inexperience shooter. And I would totally buy this taurus as a car gun or for carry.

  16. I am a .45 A.C.P. Glock fan boy. That said, the 10mm looks promising. Been shooting the .45 since I was 12 years old (1952). I have shot, and carried, just about every caliber there is. In the end, I always come back to my trusty Glock G30 (.45). In study after study everything studied, from a .22LR to a Desert Eagle, all calibers are pretty much even. Shot PLACEMENT is really what matters the most. I can hit what I aim at with my Glock. An instructor, a very long time ago, told me; “Find a weapon you feel good with and practice with it”! Another tip, from my Spanish teacher, she told us; “Practice, practice and then practice some more!”

  17. I have read other reviews of folks that have purchased this pistol and the mag release was also very hard to push for them. I hope it loosens up for you after some use. If not maybe Taurus will come out with a fix for it.

  18. I like the 10mm, want a Dissent in that caliber, but I have 2 objections to home defense use. One is the possibility of a missed shot exiting my house and going into the neighbor’s home; plus at say, 3am, if I’m awakened by an intruder, in my groggy state, that powerful round may be problematic shooting competently and accurately. 17 rounds of Nine Millimeter ought to be able to do the job.

  19. RJ Prena, There are ways to reduce that punishment of course. For example, the S&W Performance Center M&P 10mm has a ported barrel well over 5 inches long, and 4 different back straps to fit to your hand. With the lower energy loads it is a real pussycat, that still is carrying a lot more energy than the 45 ACP.

  20. Yeah, Freeman’s comparisonbetween .40 S&W and 10mm Auto. Is disingenuous, and not very accurate.

    Proper 10mm ammunition can be purchased from Buffalo Bore, Underwood Ammo, Cor-Bon and others.

  21. Based on the stats, the 10mm seems like a punishing dose of “overkill” – for both the shooter and the intended recipient.

  22. Ammo manufacturers are making basically 2 levels of 10mm ammo; either in the low-500 ft-lbs range (whatever the bullet weight) or the high 600s. Buffalo Bore’s hard cast 220 grain offering, designed for defense against large animals, has over 700 ft-lbs of energy and will pass through 36 inches of ballistic gel, as one example. It is a lot snappier to shoot as well. There are a number of such high energy ammo offerings out there.
    You said:”Performance between the 10mm and the .40 S&W is not that different.”
    You also noted “The Winchester Defender 180-grain JHP shows 1,025 feet per second with 420 foot pounds of muzzle energy for its .40 S&W cartridge. The 10mm 180-grain JHP cartridge advertises 1,240 feet per second with 614 pounds of muzzle energy.” That is just under 200 ft-lbs more energy in the 10mm, nearly 50% more muzzle energy; this is not “similar” energy from 10mm and .40, firing the same bullet.
    Looking at the various non-FMJ offerings in 45 ACP, to get over 450 ft-lbs of muzzle energy requires a +P load; most of the 45 ACP offerings are in the high 300 to low 400 ft-lb range.
    The softer 10mm loads are certainly easier to shoot though. I really like that I can use a 10mm as a concealed or open carry gun or car gun, with lighter recoil ammo, for more civilized settings, and carry it fishing here in western Wyoming with bear loads. It’s a very versatile cartridge thanks to the variety of ammo offerings.

  23. “The Taurus TH10 is an ambidextrous,” Nice to see manufactures realize tactical type firearms should really be ambidextrous, as tactical training demands it.

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