Consumer Information

Have Gun Will Travel… Transporting Your Handgun Across the United States

Picture shows an open concrete road through a plain, a blue sky with whispy clouds and a sign that reads, "open road."

Note: This post was originally published on March 2014. It has been edited and updated for clarity and accuracy as of June 2019.

The kids are out of school, longer days have you wistfully staring out the office window, and the oppressive heat of the city during summer has you itching to get out of town. Yep, summer vacation is here.

Summer is when the majority of Americans choose to take their leisure vacations, and the U.S. Travel Association reports that 79 percent of leisure travel is taken via vehicle rather than air. The only problem? Flying with handguns is a hassle.

It is much more tempting to take your handgun with you if you are driving. Though we go on vacation to relax, have fun, and let our guard down just a little bit, we always need to keep safety in mind.

You must comply with each state’s firearms transportation laws, whether you have your concealed carry license or not. If you plan on driving across country or through many different states, you will need to know each state’s laws and regulations on traveling with a firearm.

Every state has a different set of laws in regard to how you may transport your guns. While traveling through heavily restricted states, the McClure-Volkmer Act of 1986 — an amendment to the Gun Control Act of 1986 — gives travelers a “safe passage” through restricted states if guns are unloaded and cased, or locked up, and kept inaccessible with the ammunition stored separately.

Unfortunately, this law does not always protect travelers. Police pulled military veteran Lieutenant Augustine Kim over in Washington D.C. with his guns properly cased and stored, and they arrested him for four felonies. (Read the story here.)

The McClure-Volkmer Act only protects you if you are passing through a state with minimal essential stops, such as fueling up, getting food, an emergency or bathroom break. Longer stops, such as a night in a hotel, visits with friends or family, or stopping at a tourist attraction can lead you to having to comply with all of those state’s firearms laws. If you decide to stay a night in California while carrying a banned gun, you will be breaking the law.

Note: Laws frequently change. While we strive to keep this page updated, you should always check the current laws of the states you will be traveling in before heading out.

As of this writing, this is a state-by-state breakdown of the laws in each state in regard to transporting a handgun:

Alabama

Keep your handguns unloaded and cased in the trunk or a locked storage area inaccessible to the driver and passengers, unless you have a permit to carry a concealed weapon in your own state. You may only carry a loaded, concealed handgun in your car if you have a permit. You may open carry in Alabama without a permit—certain restrictions apply.

Alabama recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

Alaska

Alaska has Constitutional Carry. A loaded handgun may be carried concealed or open in the vehicle. You may open or conceal carry in Alaska without a permit.

Alaska recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

Arizona

Arizona has Constitutional Carry. You may open or conceal a loaded handgun (even on your body) anywhere in the vehicle. You may also open carry in Arizona without a permit—restrictions apply.

Arizona recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

Arkansas

Act 746 changed the language of Arkansas handgun laws. There is contention whether or not the change legally allows “constitutional carry.” Contact your lawyer, Arkansas Carry or your local law enforcement agency for clarification.

The law states:

A person commits the offense of carrying a weapon if he or she possesses a handgun, knife, or club on or about his or her person, in a vehicle occupied by him or her, or otherwise readily available for use with a purpose to attempt to unlawfully employ the handgun, knife, or club as a weapon against a person.

Arkansas recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

California

Handguns must be unloaded, cased and stored in the trunk.

California issues concealed carry permits on an “as needed” basis only and does not recognize any other states’ permits

Colorado

Rifles, shotguns and handguns can be stored anywhere in the vehicle. Magazines that hold more than 15 rounds are illegal in Colorado. You may open carry in Colorado without a permit—restrictions apply. Do not open carry in Denver without a permit.

Colorado recognizes concealed carry permits from any state that recognizes a Colorado permit.

Connecticut

You may carry a handgun through Connecticut without a permit if you are passing through, competing, transporting it for repair, attending training or meeting with an organized collector’s group. The handgun must be unloaded, cased and unavailable to the driver and passengers. Magazines that hold more than 10 rounds are illegal in Connecticut.

Connecticut does not recognize any states’ concealed carry permits.

Delaware

You may keep a loaded handgun in the open, in the vehicle or an inaccessible location. You may open carry in Delaware without a permit, however it is highly recommended to exercise caution if you do so.

Delaware recognizes the following states’ concealed carry permits: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Kentucky, Maine, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah and West Virginia.

District of Columbia

Guns must be unloaded, cased and locked in the trunk. It is illegal for a handgun to be stored in the glove compartment or any console.

The District of Columbia does not recognize any states’ concealed carry permits.

Florida

Firearms can be loaded and concealed as long as they are cased and inaccessible. Or, they can be in plain view as long as they’re in a snapped holster.

Florida recognizes the following states’ concealed carry permits: Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Alaska, Iowa, Michigan, Nebraska, South Carolina, West Virginia, Arizona, Idaho, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Dakota, Wyoming, Arkansas, Indiana, Missouri, North Dakota, Tennessee, Colorado, Kansas, Montana, Ohio, Texas, Delaware, Kentucky, New Hampshire, Oklahoma and Utah.

Georgia

Handguns may be unloaded, in a case and separate from ammunition inside the vehicle, or loaded and fully visible. Or, they can be loaded and stored in the glove compartment, console or any other compartment.

Georgia recognizes the following states’ concealed carry permits: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Ohio and Wyoming.

Idaho

Picture shows a pile of ammunition in black and white.
Many states require ammo be kept separate from firearms in the vehicle.

If you do not have a permit to carry, loaded guns in the vehicle must be in plain view. If concealed in the glove box, your firearm must be unloaded. You may open carry without a permit in Idaho. Outside city limits, you may conceal carry without a permit if you are engaging in a firearm-related activity.

Idaho recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

Illinois

Firearms must be unloaded, enclosed in a case designed to transport firearms and directly inaccessible.

Illinois does not recognize any other states’ permits.

There is a special exemption for non-residents with valid CCW permits issued from their home states. They may conceal carry in their vehicles while driving through the state, but cannot leave the vehicle with the firearm, which must be placed in a locked coontainer before exiting the vehicle.

Indiana

Handguns must be unloaded in a case stored in the trunk, unless you have a permit to carry in your state. If you hold a permit to conceal carry in your home state, you may carry a concealed handgun in the vehicle.

Indiana recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

Iowa

Handguns must be unloaded, cased and inaccessible.

Iowa recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

Kansas

Kansas is a Constitutional Carry state. Your gun may be loaded or unloaded, concealed or in plain view while driving through Kansas.

Kansas recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

Kentucky

Loaded handguns may be concealed in your vehicle if they are kept in the glove box, center console or another compartment that was “originally installed in the motor vehicle by its manufacturer.” You may open carry in Kentucky without a permit—some restrictions apply.

Kentucky recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

Louisiana

Loaded handguns may be transported anywhere in your vehicle. You may open carry without a permit in Louisiana.

Louisiana recognizes the following states’ permits: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Maine

You may carry in Maine openly without a permit if the carrier is over 21 and meets requirements determined by Maine law. This includes inside your vehicle.

Maine recognizes the following states’ permits: Delaware, South Dakota, Louisiana, North Dakota, Wyoming, Arkansas, Pennsylvania and Michigan.

Maryland

Guns must be unloaded, cased and stored in an inaccessible area.

Maryland does not recognize any other states’ permits.

Massachusetts

Guns must be unloaded, cased and stored in an inaccessible area. Massachusetts has strict gun laws and is a state that will most likely enforce the just “passing through” provision.

Massachusetts does not recognize any other states’ permit.

Michigan

You may only transport loaded handguns through Michigan if you hold a license to carry from your home state. If you do not have a permit, keep the gun unloaded, locked in a case and inaccessible. You may carry openly in Michigan without a permit.

Michigan recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

Minnesota

All guns must be unloaded and securely cased.

Minnesota recognizes the following states’ permits: Alaska, Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Wyoming.

Mississippi

A loaded and concealed handgun may be carried anywhere in the vehicle. Open carry of a handgun without a permit is legal in Mississippi. Mississippi has a limited permitless carry law. Off-body carry without a permit is legal. Disabled vets, active duty military and retired law enforcement may carry concealed without a permit.

Mississippi recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

Missouri

A loaded and concealed handgun may be carried anywhere in the vehicle—even on your body. Open carry is legal in Missouri without a permit.

Missouri recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

Montana

All guns may be loaded and transported anywhere in the vehicle, even on your body. You may conceal carry in Montana without a permit if you are outside city boundaries, hiking or camping. You may open carry in Montana without a permit.

Montana recognizes the following states’ permits: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, New York City, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

Nebraska

Depending on where you are in Nebraska, a loaded handgun may be in open view if you do not hold a license to conceal carry. However, it is best to keep all guns unloaded and stored in the trunk while driving through Nebraska. You may open carry in Nebraska without a permit, but certain areas restrict it. Check with the local laws before carrying.

Nebraska recognizes the following states’ permits: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

Nevada

Loaded handguns must be in plain sight or in the glove box, but not concealed on your body. You may carry in Nevada openly without a permit.

Nevada recognizes the following states’ permits: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Delaware, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Minnesota, Mississippi Enhanced Permit, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

New Hampshire

Loaded handguns are allowed to be carried in a vehicle without a permit, though loaded rifles and shotguns are not. You may open carry a loaded handgun in New Hampshire without a permit.

New Hampshire recognizes the following states’ permits, only if you are a resident of that state: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Utah, West Virginia and Wyoming.

New Jersey

New Jersey has very strict firearms laws. The transportation of firearms is generally illegal in New Jersey unless you have a permit to carry issued from New Jersey. It is best to leave firearms at home if you plan to drive through New Jersey.

New Jersey does not recognize any other states’ permit.

New Mexico

Transportation of firearms in the vehicle is unrestricted. You may conceal or have in plain view a loaded or unloaded handgun. You may carry openly in New Mexico without a permit. Do not carry in an establishment that sells or serves alcohol, however.

New Mexico recognizes the following states’ permits: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Idaho Enhanced Permit, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, Nevada, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia and Wyoming.

New York

New York has very strict firearms laws. All guns must be unloaded, cased and stored in an inaccessible location. If stopped, you might have to prove you are not staying in New York if you are transporting a handgun.

New York does not recognize any other states’ permit.

North Carolina

As long as it is in plain sight, you can keep a loaded handgun inside the vehicle. Otherwise, a loaded handgun cannot be concealed or readily accessible inside your vehicle. You can open carry in North Carolina without a permit—restricted areas apply.

North Carolina recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

North Dakota

North Dakota is a constitutional concealed carry state, though only for residents.

Handguns inside the vehicle must be unloaded and in plain sight or properly cased and secured. You may only openly carry a loaded handgun without a permit if you are engaged in target shooting, hunting or camping.

North Dakota recognizes the following states’ permits: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

Ohio

Handguns must be unloaded and in plain sight inside the vehicle or locked in a case. Unless you have a permit to conceal, you may not have a loaded firearm in your car. You may open carry in Ohio without a permit.

Ohio recognizes all states’ permits.

Oklahoma

All guns inside the vehicle must be unloaded in plain view or cased unless you have a concealed carry permit. If you choose to case your firearm, the case must be visible.

Oklahoma recognizes all states’ permits.

Oregon

You may carry a loaded firearm in the car as long as it is not concealed or readily accessible. Each city in Oregon has different laws regarding carrying a loaded firearm in a vehicle, however.

Oregon does not recognize any other states’ permit.

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania is a restricted state. All firearms must be unloaded, cased, and stored in an inaccessible location. Pennsylvania is also one of those states that you must be just “passing through” while transporting your firearms. In most places, open carry is legal without a permit, but don’t open carry in Philadelphia.

Pennsylvania recognizes the following states’ permits: Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, North Carolina, North Dakota Class 1 Permit, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming and Arizona, Florida, Maine, Utah, Virginia for residents of those states only.

Rhode Island

For just “passing through” purposes, you may transport your firearm unloaded, cased and stored in an inaccessible location. Keep ammunition separate in a locked container.

Rhode Island does not recognize any other states’ permit.

South Carolina

It is legal to keep a loaded handgun in the glove box, console or trunk of the vehicle.

South Carolina recognizes the following states’ permits, only if you are a resident of that state: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Idaho Enhanced Permit, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia and Wyoming.

South Dakota

As long as they are in plain sight, you can have loaded handgun inside the vehicle. Concealed, unloaded handguns are legal if enclosed in a space such as the glove box, center console or trunk. You may open carry in South Dakota without a permit.

South Dakota recognizes the following states’ permits: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, New York City, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

Tennessee

A loaded firearm can be carried anywhere in your vehicle without a permit, open or concealed—just not on your body.

Tennessee recognizes all states’ permits.

Texas

A loaded handgun may be concealed anywhere in the vehicle.

Texas recognizes the following states’ permits: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, New York City, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio permits issued or renewed on or after March 23, 2015, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, and Wyoming.

Utah

A loaded handgun can be transported either concealed or in plain view in the vehicle.

Utah recognizes all states’ permits.

Vermont

Vermont has Constitutional Carry. Handguns may be loaded and concealed in the vehicle without having a permit.

Vermont does not need to recognize any other states’ permits. You may carry a handgun in Vermont concealed or open without a permit.

Virginia

Loaded handguns in the vehicle must be in plain sight or in a closed container such as the glove box. Open carry without a permit is legal in Virginia. However, in urban areas you cannot carry a centerfire handgun that holds more than 20 rounds.

Virginia recognizes the following states’ permits: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Idaho Enhanced Permit, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

Washington

You may not carry a loaded firearm in your vehicle without a concealed carry license or permit. All firearms need to be unloaded and cased. You may open carry in Washington without a permit, but there are restrictions. You may conceal carry without a permit if you are hunting, fishing, camping or target shooting.

Washington recognizes the following states’ permits: Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, North Carolina, North Dakota (Class 1 Permit), Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah and Idaho (Enhanced Permit only).

West Virginia

A loaded handgun must be in plain view. You may open carry without a permit in West Virginia.

West Virginia recognizes the following states’ permits: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia and Wyoming

Wisconsin

No concealed firearms are allowed inside the vehicle. Wisconsin has strict regulations as to what is considered concealed. It is best to keep handguns loaded or unloaded in an inaccessible place. You may open carry in Wisconsin without a permit.

Wisconsin recognizes the following states’ permits: Alaska (permits issued or renewed after January 14, 2013), Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri (permits issued or renewed on or after August, 28, 2013), Montana, Nebraska, Nevada (permits issued or renewed on or after July 1, 2001), New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio (permits issued or renewed on or after March 23, 2015), Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virgin Islands, Virginia (non-resident permit only), Washington, West Virginia (permits issued after June 8, 2012) and Wyoming.

Wyoming

Loaded handguns can be carried in your car as long as they are visible and not on your body. You may open carry a handgun in Wyoming without a permit.

Wyoming recognizes the following states’ permits: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

If you are going to take a road trip across many states, pre-plan your route so you know how to transport your firearms legally. In addition, since laws change frequently, it is best to double-check the current law in the state you will be visiting so you know whether or not you may carry your firearm or if you will need to keep it locked up in the hotel safe.

The NRA has a complete “right to carry reciprocity and recognition” map that I highly suggest you look at before heading out with your firearm on your vacation. If you plan on flying this summer, read “How to Survive Flying in the Not-So-Friendly Skies.”

If you know a state law that needs updating from the above information, please tell us in the comment section and provide a link to the changed law.

NOTE: This post was last updated on June 12, 2019, to reflect recent changes in Colorado, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, and Nevada.

The Mission of Cheaper Than Dirt!'s blog, The Shooter's Log, is to provide information—not opinions—to our customers and the shooting community. We want you, our readers, to be able to make informed decisions. The information provided here does not represent the views of Cheaper Than Dirt!

Comments (128)

  1. Correction to Illinois, IL gives a special exception to non-resident travelers to carry loaded and concealed in a vehicle so long as that person is a permit holder from their home state and can legally possess a firearm in their home state. So in a nutshell you can be armed to protect yourself within your car just not while walking the streets of Chicago.

  2. I have a Texas CCL. I live in CT so I am a non-resident Texas CCL holder. Some states will only recognize your CCL if you are a resident of the state where your CCL was issued. Your “Have gun will travel . . .” article did not state whether a state would recognize your CCL if you are a non-resident of the issuing state. This is important. I know, for example, that PA does not recognize non-resident TX CCL’s. Please add this information to your “Have gun . . .” article.

  3. An update on the MS state law. MS residents may carry concealed without a permit although there are restrictions on certain locations that are disallowed.

  4. The NM information isn’t correct. Anyone, resident or not, can open carry here. However only concealed carry permit holders can carry concealed.

  5. In Maine, since 2015, you don’t need a permit to carry open or concealed, if you are 21 or over. You can carry concealed if you are 18 to 21 if you have a CC permit, active duty or honorably discharged You CAN carry a loaded and concealed handgun in a vehicle. If you are stopped by law enforcement you must notify them you are concealing if you don’t have a permit, with a permit there is no duty to notify.This is for residents and non residents. Maine does not have a magazine capacity limit, but many states, like Vermont, do. I don’t know where you get your information from, but there are enough mistakes in this article to get people locked up for a long time!

  6. If I have a concealed carry permit in PA, does that mean I can conceal carry in Ohio without an Ohio permit? Will they honor the PA permit?

  7. Thanks for this info. I will be traveling in an RV through numerous states. I do not have a firearm yet but will purchase one and will get a permit for Mississippi. My wife will also be traveling, does she have to have her name on the permit? Does this only apply to handguns? I’m not a hunter but would consider a small rifle. I am a disabled Army veteran.

  8. It should be noted that in most cases, Colorado only recognizes concealed carry permits if you are a resident of the state that permit was issued in. i.e – If you have a Utah DL and a Utah CCW permit, it is recognized, but if you have a CA DL and a Utah CCW permit, it would not be recognized.

  9. Your listing for Colorado is wrong. A citizen IS allowed to have a loaded pistol / revolver in a vehicle. In Colorado a vehicle is considered an extension of the home, hence the ability to carry – even concealed – when within your vehicle. Once you exit the vehicle, then the weapon must be openly carried, unless the citizen has a CCP.

    The “unloaded” weapon specification only refers to rifles and shotguns, and only for a cartridge /shell being in the chamber.

    https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/csp/colorado-gun-laws

    1. As helpful as this article is, the truth is you carry where you feel you need to carry, regardless of state lines, signs, or zones.

    2. As I recall from the Knowles vs Iowa case, officers are not permitted to search a vehicle on a traffic stop. 4th Amend.search – only in pursuit of evidence concerning the offense. Once vehicle is stopped no additional evidence by search can be obtained about the offense of a traffic cite. S.O.F.A. type agreement is that Military are authorized to drive on home state Lic. & plates while assigned away from home state..

    3. Actually GA law changed a couple years ago. You can carry loaded anywhere in the car as long as you are not ineligible for a carry permit. It used to be just the glove compartment, center console or trunk unless you had a permit, then you could carry anywhere. They changed it to you can carry anywhere regardless you just can’t be ineligible for a permit.

  10. Maine just passed Constitutional carry, same as Vermont. CC licenses will still be available for people who have to travel to reciprocating states.

    It’s nice not to have to beg the gov’t for something that the 2nd Amendment has already granted us, via the Constitution. NH came very close to get CC privilege (rights), but they made a mistake by electing a Democratic governor who vetoed the CC bill which was passed by both NH houses.

  11. Since I’m from Colorado, I want to point out that the Colorado section has some errors:
    1. Unless I’m missing something major, the “must be unloaded rule only applies to Colorado Parks and Wildlife property, and even in those cases, handguns are specifically excluded from the “must be unloaded” rule. Only Non-handguns must be unloaded. (See C.R.S. 33-6-125 and C.R.S. 18-12)

    2. Only “high capacity” magazines that were purchased after July 1, 2013 are banned. The prosecution has the burden of proof. (See C.R.S. 18-12-302)

  12. Federal Agent…in the extreme stretch of things, could be an Air Marshal, TSA Agent, any agent of the US Armed Forces such as CID, OSI or NIS, someone from the DHS, anyone with investigative credentials within an arm of the Federal Government, DEA, FBI, USMS, USSS, US Postal Inspector, BATFE and the list goes on and on. Hell, even Elvis Presley had the credentials of a Federal DEA Agent! So, before you wig out on IF someone COULD be an actual Federal Agent or Officer, recognize just how broad that field covers. It IS entirely possible G-MAN is a Federal Agent to some degree. Would one throw that out for the general public without official cause or reason…not too likely. Is it still possible? YEPPER, it sure is!

    1. @ Mitch,

      I’ll take your money since I’ve already won. I win because you’re not intelligent enough to know that a so-called “meter maid” at Dulles is not a Federal Agent of any sort. They fall under the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority which provides enforcement under Virginia State Statutes.

      Regardless, I will assume you chose a Parking Enforcement Officer in an effort to be degrading. I find you repugnant to insult such a noble profession, which is still more authority than you could ever hope to possess. Tootles for now…

    2. Whatever makes your wings flap… You call me unintelligent, yet you have no sarcasm meter installed in your pea sized brain..

      By the way, the “Noble profession” of Meter maid is only noble in that the people doing it pay the mortgage and feed their families… The collection of parking fines supporting who knows what isn’t noble at all…

      By the way, they make almost as much as TSA “Agents”, who are at the bottom of the “Fed” chain, in terms of respect at least…

      You can argue all you want, but it’s clear you have an agenda… Don’t get pulled over and present a fake badge you bought on Ebay… Some real cops don’t like that

    3. @ Mitch,

      What argument? I annihilated everything you’ve ever posted with facts and you sissy-rant back with utter nonsense because you know you can’t compete. Keep it coming, your quite amusing in a childlike kind of manner…

    4. Facts about what???

      The only fact is you are a Narcissist… And the simple fact is, you don’t even try to hide it…

      I’m just a retired nobody on a message board that knows enough to put you in your place… I was paid to do it at one time, but now it’s just like busting fake people… Pure entertainment..

      By the way, genius… If you are actually a real Federal Agent, and not some kid that can beat Area 51 on his Nintendo, congrats… Nobody cares… It doesn’t matter if you are the kid that puts mayo on subs at Subway… If you act like you are the best at what you do, people gravitate away from you

      You have a personality disorder… Go to a VA Nursing home and meet some of the last WWII Veterans or Korean Veterans and learn something… Maybe you’ll figure out you don’t own the world

    5. @ Mitch,

      You keep posting, yet all I read is,

      “Blah blah blah blah blah embarrassingly can’t find anything else to come back with blah blah blah. Blah blah blah hoping detracting from the original topic maybe no one will notice my impotent need to troll blah blah blah. Blah blah blah this G-Man guy so kicked my ass but I can’t let on blah blah blah. Blah blah blah I need a break so I can lick my wounds blah blah blah. Blah blah blah I’ll just make inane off-topic remarks in hopes it will buy me time to come up with something of substance blah blah blah. Blah blah blah maybe an extra paragraph of nonsense will throw of his trail blah blah blah.”

    6. Oh, you absolutely nailed it, G-Man… You, and you alone are “Cyber ME”… The Badge that is impenetrable… I lay down my arms and walk away, because Cyber ME cannot be defeated… Cyber ME does in fact own the world…

      My Bad

    7. @ Mitch,

      Finally, you posted something of fact and with real substance. See that wasn’t so hard to acknowledge in the end… now was it? Ultimately your yielding honesty will make you a better man down the road. So with that, I bid you a good night.

    8. G-Man…

      You should try out for America’s Got Talent… You do have talent… Normal people like me don’t understand, but that is what makes you a special person, don’t let anyone tell you you aren’t special

    9. I’m a retired G-Man, and just spent some time I’ll never get back reading several of @G-Man posts. Embarrassing. We already get a bad enough rap with the movie/TV stereotypes, and then you have to come out and reinforce it all? Good gravy man, get a grip. It would be very easy to clarify LEOSA issues without being obnoxious. In my experience, you seem a lot less like a G-Man and a lot more like a D-Bag. So to all Shooter’s Log readers, on behalf of G-Men and G-Women everywhere, I apologize.

    10. To all Shooter’s Log readers,

      Just so you all are aware, ExFed’s apology isn’t sincere. He’s using it as an excuse to invent a reason to jump on the trolling bandwagon to get a lick in because he is still sore at me for tightening his shot group on another forum topic last year.

      Look ExFed, we’ve been through this before. Anyone can read my posts and see I am stern but generally polite until someone first comes off as an authority, and yet still puts out bad information to people. Worse is when they’ll continue to defend their bad info to save face even after they’ve been overwhelmingly proven wrong.

      Yeah I know it is just a forum, but I view it as a disservice when I see how many younger kids are influenced by what they pick up off the Internet and will treat it as if it were God’s spoken word.

      So because of this new drive-thru information era, people that post and claim to be authorities need to also be responsibly accurate or just learn how important it is to simply shut up. Because the toll such disinformation is taking on the younger generation has yet to be fully realized; but I see the damage ever increasing in my daily operations.

      So it is unfortunate that since our last encounter you still don’t get it. Maybe you’ve been out of it far too long to see the world has changed into a very different kind of dangerous – a type of the likes we’ve never seen before. And because of what I’ve seen, that the average citizen never does, I view life as far too precious and serious right now for me to play Mr. Polite and put up with other people’s BS… even to the slightest degree.

      And a parting word of advice back at ya on your forum name… when “Ex” is placed before a titled noun as in “ExFed”, it is intended to indicate termination under less than honorable conditions. You’ll never hear a marine call themselves an ex-Marine. It is customary to us the term “Former” before the proper noun or you’ll get your ass kicked. So unless the shoe fits, I would seriously consider a new forum name.

    11. G-Man, although I realize you know all and see all, I’m not whoever you got in a scrape with last year and I’ve never posted here before. I was just very disappointed to see the arrogance coming from an apparent federal law enforcement officer. I know you don’t want my opinion, but I see your approach as unnecessary and unhelpful. As for the “ExFed” name, it was just my attempt to be non-specific about my background. I won’t be using it anymore as this is my last post.

      I’ll take you at your word about your rationalization for the attitude, but I’ll also stand behind my apology which was, in fact, very sincere. I retired from the FBI in 2012, and I just hate to see the legacy of many who came before me tarnished.

  13. Any and all “gun laws” are forbidden by the Constitution – Has anyone actually “read” the Second Amendment?

    “Who are the militia?” – “Why the militia is the whole of the people” – Tench Coxe

    “regulated” ….. clocks are “regulated”, meaning that they are put in “good order” not “restricted by laws” …. Same applies to the militia. The militia is to be in “good order” and “functioning as should be”.

    “being necessary to the security of a free State” – – “against ALL enemies, foreign or domestic” …. how many are sworn to this?

    “The Right of the People” – who are the people? The people ARE the militia.

    “arms” – as defined in 1775, “any MILITARY styled weapon that may be fielded by a crew of three men, or fewer” ….. kind of puts a different light on things doesn’t it?

    “infringement” – definition; ANYTHING that one might be forced to do that one does not wish to do. PERIOD.

  14. I’m Irish and ugly as a brick, but I can destroy you in any debate, and I apparently already have, Federal… Agent… Man…

    YOU ARE ACTING LIKE A TROLL… That’s all I have to say… Nothing wrong with it if you are a kid or even an adult… But saying you are a Fed and arguing with fellow LEO’s on a message board… ???

    LETS JUST SAY you are actually a Fed… Lets just say you are arguing amongst other LEO’s in various fields… Let’s just say you aren’t a kid in a basement playing some video game, thinking you own the world..

    Lets just say that… I can’t find my way around that, a Fed on the message board ALL DAY long…

    Maybe an actual Fed would read my original post on page 1 and comment, because it benefits everyone… Well, everyone without a giant ego, inflated by a real occupation or not

    1. @ Mitch:

      Of course in your mind you probably imagine that you’ve DESTROYED everyone you’ve ever engaged in a debate. That just makes you annoying, but by no means triumphant. A legend in your own mine syndrome I would say.

      Where the actual subject matter is concerned in the proper context of this article, what you opine to be nothing more than trolling is actually the point of the forum of which I have diligently engaged and been quite informative to others I might add.

      It is you that is actually trolling under the proper definition. I would like to say I am sorry you can’t discern the difference, but I don’t really care. Ta ta…

  15. So, 2 days later, and nobody wants to read my comment and know how they can actually get rid of this whole debate by changing the laws in the states… Everybody is lazy and just wants to know how to get from point A to point B… That’s all good, enjoy oppression

    Bonus to all the cops fighting amongst themselves today.. I have known probably 40 cops in my day in the Army Reserve units I was in and a few Federal Agents, and none of them would post on a message board saying so…

    Did you get your badges from a Cracker Jack Box???

    1. @ Mitch:

      It is quite obvious why it is 2 days later, and nobody wants to read your comment.

      You’ll just have to live with the fact that I am in-fact an active Federal Agent, and yes… here I am posting on a message board saying so.

      And to bury your inaccurate assumption that none would post and say so, I have actually met other agents on this very board and communicated with them offline.

      So deal with it bud.

    2. HAHA… I don’t give a flying rats ass if you are a Secret… Agent… Man… You are acting like a little child along with all the other (Maybe) LEO’s in this topic…

      If you didn’t make it through Basic Training, but you still have your HS ROTC uniform framed, it’s all good…

      Maybe It’s my bad… Maybe I’m from the TWILIGHT ZONE where people in certain positions believe in OPSEC…

      Based on the fact you didn’t mention one aspect of my original post, you really didn’t make an attempt to read it… It would help everyone on this board that is actually here to find answers, not a pissing match between so called LEO “Professionals”

    3. Hey Mitch. I think it is the general opinion her that Gman is a egotist with an over inflated sense of self worth. He is not typical of the Federal agents that I have come in contact with. And having worked in the DC area, I have met quite a few.He’s irrelevant.

    4. Joe Grant… I grew up with a now actual Fed that thought his stuff didn’t stink from day one… (10 years old on)… Just an absolute arrogant prick that to this day nobody wants to hang out with.. He is the only Fed that I ever met that made me pinch the bridge of my nose when he opened his mouth…

      We only went places with him because we instantly looked better…

    5. I’m betting that Gman has a tee shirt that reads “I am Gman. Listen ye to me and thy shalt be saved.

    6. Something like that… I’m not sure about the Man part anymore though… Maybe G-Jenner fan

  16. I don’t mean mean to argue, but there is no misconception on my part. When you applied for your LEOSA, you applied in the state or through the jurisdiction. You had to meet that state’s requirements to obtain it. If you fail to maintain those requirements they have the legal right to revoke it. Since I am originally from Illinois, they require all LEOSA permit holders to be range certified once a year regardless of your location. Failure to do so will result in revocation of the permit. They also reserve the right to restrict specific types of ammunition one carries. You need to broaden your horizons through various FOPs.

    1. Talk about needing to broaden horizons, had you ever considered that I am an active Federal Agent. My issuing agency completely handles issuance of my LEOSA creds at a Federal level. The state or its jurisdiction has nothing whatsoever to do with the manner in which anyone, from any agency, applies for or holds their LEOSA credentials.

      Matter-of-fact, the FEDERAL act specifically spells out it is each officer’s agency which is the only entity responsible for the issuance of LEOSA credentials. There are no state held databases to track or revoke these FEDERALLY authorized credentials.

      Yes sir, you most certainly do have vast misconceptions on your part. Please stop trying to argue for the sake of it and try to learn something if you care to.

      There are Local Police, County Sheriffs, State Patrols, Federal Agents, Tribal Police, Railroad Police, University Police, U.S. Coast Guard, Military Police, Corrections Officers, and Court Officers to name a few… regardless of which department an officer hails, if they fail to maintain the FEDERALLY prescribed requirements for holding their LEOSA creds, no one at a state level would have the slightest clue as to how to go about revoking something they never issued to begin with.

      As well, they needn’t worry either; given the FEDERAL law automatically makes the credential invalid if a carrier fails to maintain the FEDERAL requirement. The annual weapons qualification MUST be accomplished by your agency or a certified instructor that regularly qualifies your agency. Again, the state has nothing to do with it.

      And finally, I must drive home the point that the LEOSA act was written in such a way that it prevents state jurisdictions from restricting ammunition types carried by LEOSA credentialed officers. The issue has been discussed ad nauseam by every agency to the point we are tired of the repetitive memos explaining it.

      I travel frequently in my job and attend many joint task force meetings and multijurisdictional law enforcement conferences covering everything from anti-terrorism to intelligence sharing and cooperation between agencies. I am regularly elbow to elbow with officers from all over the country and at all levels. Please trust that I know what I am talking about and put this to rest.

  17. Many states say lock in a trunk. What about traveling in a pickup truck? No bed cover? Illegal to keep behind the seat?

  18. I don’t mean for this to be a trick question. But if I’m from a state like Alaska that has no requirements for CCW, and travel to a state that acknowledges reciprocity, how does that work? I’m sure the short answer is “turn around and put your hands behind your back”, or “sign here, press hard, 4 copies”… but is there any legal standing to argue that your home state does not require a CCW therefore I don’t need one in “XYZ”?
    I live in Kalifonya, so I know what the answer is here, komrade. Land of the Freak, home of the Brainless. And only one conservative Governor in the last six it’s not likely to change for the better any time soon.

    1. I think that Alaska has a Constitutional right to carry. Not a separate CCW law. If you are living the People Republic of California, you must live by their rules.If your official residence is in Alaska you should be good in all states that have reciprocity. But it would be a good thing to check before going there.

    2. Thom,

      I don’t get the joke about spelling with a K instead of a C, but if you dislike any state that much, why don’t you just move? You only have one life and it goes quick. Unless you are in prison or in the military, nobody is stopping you from moving on. If you don’t like it leave. From the list above, Mississippi sounds like a good choice.

  19. I think Joe Grant’s made a good point. There is an assumption here that different standards apply to LEOSA permit holders. True the permit is good for all 50 states. Yet the gun laws in different states still apply to LEOSA holders. The only exemption is an extension of police courtesy. The main difference is when, how, and if the LEOSA holder has to deploy their firearm, they are subject to meet that jurisdiction police regulations on the use of force. There are jurisdictions that view LEOSA as the same as a CCW holder.

    1. @ Joe:

      I don’t really see where you think Joe Grant ever made that point. He simply stated the author failed to mention LEOSA. There was never really much more offered to make a point.

      Nevertheless, I must point out a bit of misinformation made on your part. You are incorrect to write, “the gun laws in different states still apply to LEOSA holders”. For instance my LEOSA creds prevent any state law from limiting the type of ammo I may carry.

      A good example would be New Jersey law which heavily restricts its citizen possession of hollow point ammunition. They may only store it in their homes and may only carry it to and from approved and registered firing ranges or when hunting. But in no way may they carry it as a self-defense load like LEOSA allows me to.

      Try carrying concealed in states that don’t honor other states’ reciprocity at all, yet I can legally carry in any of the 50 States as well as the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the possessions of the United States.

      For your statement to be accurate if the “gun laws in different states still apply “ to LEOSA holders, we’d be forced to get approval from each chief law enforcement officer when visiting “May-Issue” or “No-Issue” states. Yet we do not.

      And I have no idea where you got the idea that LEOSA holders “are subject to meet[ing] that jurisdiction[s] police regulations on the use of force.” That is simply not in the law anywhere.

      And finally, for you to write, “There are jurisdictions that view LEOSA as the same as a CCW holder.” – is also incorrect given that LEOSA is Federal Law meaning the individual states have no choice on how they view it. It is the highest law which trumps any state or local law.

      I could go on, but I hope now you get my point. Some of your misconceptions may stem from LEOSA specifically stating carriers must comply with a state’s magazine capacity laws as well as schools zones and state or federal building rules. But keep in mind, that is because the Federal Law dictates such specific requirements for LEOSA carriers to comply in such a manner; which has nothing to do with anything the states think they have to say.

    2. Exactly. I was not trying to make a point. It was only and observation. No need to get your pants in a knot. But you need to re read that law about Leosa trumping all local laws.There are exceptions.

    3. @ Joe Grant:

      The only thing in need of being reread is for you in what I wrote. You obviously skimmed it or have a reading comprehension problem. Nothing I wrote conflicts with the Federal LEOSA law; and that includes any exceptions it provides, of which, are granted by LEOSA and not the states.

      If a Federal law stipulates one must comply with certain aspects of a state’s laws, it is still the Federal law that is effecting compliance. Double-jeopardy would not protect someone were they to violate this portion of LEOSA because they could still be prosecuted both in a local court and then again in a Federal court.

      Regardless, as a former law enforcement officer (as you claim) you should know all Federal Law when found in conflict with a state or local law must preempt or “trump” all other laws. It is known in Constitutional speak as the Supremacy Clause (Article VI, clause 2) of the United States Constitution.

      …and my pants are not in a knot as I find setting the record straight quite enjoyable and stimulating. But thanks for your concern anyway.

    4. Do you have a low self esteem problem?.
      You cannot seem give a response without injecting a personal slur of some kind.Questioning my intelligence, my truthfulness, my ability to understand. Section 928C (b) of HR218 clearly stated that this law does not supersede certain aspects of state laws. Those are the exceptions that I was referring to.

    5. @ Jor Grant:

      First I must point out that once again you are re-projecting your own insulting attitude. My responses, if you look more closely, do merely match the discourteous language you’ve dished up to begin with. In other words you can initiate it but you can’t take it.

      As for Section 928C (b) of HR218, I’ve already clearly made mention of those 2 single-line restrictions within subsection (b) of the Act and then went on to explain how it is still the FEDERAL Law that prescribes such adherence and not the States; thus giving the Federal Government the force, not the States.

      At any time the Federal Government can revise the Act as they recently did in 2010 to add Military Police amongst other changes. You are just going to have to accept that the authority flows from the Federal Government and not the States in allowing one to carry under LEOSA.

  20. Please verify Nevada on accepting Arizona CCW permits. Last I heard once Arizona changed the qualifying requirements Nevada no longer accepted Arizona permits

    1. @ Paul:

      Yes, Nevada is once again accepting Arizona CCWs. I don’t blame you for the double-take given it was not that long ago they dropped Arizona after it changed the course requirements. Apparently Nevada lets their Sheriffs’ and Chiefs’ Association approve which states are reciprocal. They very recently did an update and now include Arizona again.

      As always, this is something that could change again in any state – so it’s good that articles such as this spur conversation for folks to keep abreast. Likewise, with the political climate becoming ever so much more immature and vitriolic rest assured there will be future (liberal) state legislatures that will change their reciprocity laws just to punish more gun-friendly states.

    2. Effective June 18,2015 Arizona CCW permits are Valid in The State of Nevada.
      1) You must have your AZ. permit and ID immediately available when carrying concealed. 2) You CAN’T carry in a airport. 3) NO GUN signs do not have “Rule of Law” You have to be Verbally notified. 4) You CAN carry in bars. 5) You must be 1000 feet from an occupied structure to Target Shoot. 6) You CAN carry in Casinos (but may be asked to leave)
      7) The AVI is on a RESERVATION = NO GUNS.

  21. Did I forget to mention that between my Law enforcement jobs in Kentucky, and Virginia, that I spent five years at the NRA in Fairfax VA, working at the Institute for Legislative Action. And that after much lobbying by us, that the Law Enforcement Officer Safety act was passed by Congress, and signed by President Bush in July of 2003? Guess that’s why I’m passionate about everyone knowing about LEOSA.

  22. Illinois now allows holders of a concealed carry license from their home state to travel through Illinois while carrying a firearm. Under Illinois law you cannot get out of your vehicle armed and must store and secure the firearm in your vehicle, if you stop and get out of your vehicle. Reference:
    430 ILCS 66 Firearm Concealed Carry Act. Section 40. Non-resident license applications. Paragraph (e).

  23. Obviously your are better educated, more informed, better qualified more articulate, and have a greater grasp of what the writer of the article intend to convey than I do., I yield to our superior intellect and knowledge.

  24. I understand LEOSA, but the areas he is mentioning falls outside of it. When entering another jurisdiction, an officer active or retired falls under their rules. It’s like traveling from Kansas into Illinois. You must meet Illinois guidelines and a certified copy of range qualification must be on file. Entering Chicago requires pre-notification. It’s called police courtesy and respect for thats departments jurisdiction.

  25. I was in Law Enforcement for 30 active year before retiring.. I’m guessing from your arrogant attitude, that your were not born yet went I was first sworn in.
    I’m not the one that I thought should be informed about that law.

    1. @ Joe Grant:

      Actually you are projecting your own arrogance and I was dishing it back at you. Please don’t mistake the two. For it was you that presumed to tell the author what she was missing in her own article… that is arrogant.

      As for my time of birth in relation to your entrance date into law enforcement, I fail to see how that would have anything to do with rating one’s attitude in any capacity. But for the record I have been in law enforcement now for 33 years and counting.

      I continue to stand by the author’s decision to not include LEOSA in her article. If a person is entitled to a LEOSA credential, they are obviously already well informed of the law. If they are not entitled to such credentials, there is simply no point in bringing it up.

      It would be like expecting an article on home first aid to also cover a professional paramedic’s duty to treat at all accident scenes. It simply does not apply.

  26. Am I reading Wisconsin’s entry correctly? They’ll allow the Virginia Non-Resident permit but not the Resident Permit?

  27. In an article about laws in all the states regarding carry/transport of guns by those who don’t reside in the state, I think it is important to mention a federal law that also applies.

    If you have a gun that has been involved in interstate commerce (I take that to mean has ever crossed state lines, although perhaps it only applies to guns manufactured outside your home state?) then that gun can’t be carried except unloaded and in a container (forget if it has to be locked) when it passes within 1000 feet of a school. Unless you have a CCW issued by the state where the school is located (recognition of your home state CCW by that state doesn’t count.)

    You can’t know when you will drive past a school that may not even be visible from the street you’re on. So it appears only unloaded and locked in a case lets you comply with both federal and state laws. And some states require you to keep the case visible, an invitation to burglary??

  28. In your article about traveling with firearms in the United Stated, you have no mention of carrying and traveling with a LEOSA permit.

    1. @ Joe Grant:

      I find it odd that you would think the author would include LEOSA in an article that attempts to break down the individual laws for the average citizen as they travel with their guns through each state. The LEOSA on the other hand provides exclusive protections which applies only for active and retired law enforcement or military police and covers them equally no matter which state they may travel through.

    2. I find it odd that an all inclusive title like ” Have gun will travel..Transporting your handgun across the United States”, that there was not then a statement in the beginning to the effect that ” These guidelines do not apply to those with a LEOSA permit, as the LEOSA carry permit is valid in all States.” .

    3. I find it even odder that you think a LEOSA carrier would need to be informed of such a thing. If you possess a LEOSA permit, you’d better already know why. All others need NOT be informed because it would not apply to them in the least.

      And if you don’t agree with that, try this… at least 2 people feel it did not need mentioning: me and the author… so that makes 2 against one so the majority wins.

    4. I work with and live with peace officers. Never did I assume the information applied to anyone but the average citizen. I know there are law enforcement careers that entitle those individuals to unique privileges. It’s when one of those properly entitled individuals gets cocky and needs to puff their chest that I question their ability to utilize that privilege without their ego in the way. Mind, it’s only a few. This information didn’t deserve such a retort. Thank you for sharing the comprehensive state guide. I have looked it over for a coming trip.

    5. Maybe you should just quit posting your gripes about others and start writing your own articles and run them up the Cheaper than Dirt flag pole.

  29. Why do I feel like some of this is regurgitated without fact checking.
    Illinois has had concealed carry for a year now.

  30. Just wanted to make a correction,
    Wisconsin requires a concealed carry permit to carry a weapon concealed on (or near) you body or vehicle unless you are in your house, at your place of business, or on your own property. (Wi. Stat. Ann. § 941.23(2)(e).)

  31. From the State Police website.
    All firearms transported into the State of New Jersey:

    •Shall be carried unloaded and contained in a closed and fastened case, gunbox, securely tied package, or locked in the trunk of the automobile in which it is being transported, and in the course of travel, shall include only such deviations as are reasonably necessary under the circumstances.

    •The firearm should not be directly accessible from the passenger compartment of the vehicle. If the vehicle does not have a compartment separate from the passenger compartment, the firearm and ammunition must be in a locked container other than the vehicle’s glove compartment or console.

  32. You are incorrect in part about Colorado restrictions on magazines over a capacity of 15 rounds. They are not illegal if you owned them prior to the new unconstitutional law that went into effect in July of 2013. Ownership prior to the new law has ben grandfathered.

    1. Exactly DJ and since magazines are not serialized or date stamped it is impossible for any LEO to look at a high cap mag and determine legality. The only way a citizen would get gigged on this is if they opened their trap and admitted to recent purchase.

      Best advice during any interaction with law enforcement is to be polite, compliant to orders, and keep our yaps shut.

  33. Colorado does allow a loaded handgun inside vehicle. The wording “if needed for protection.” So if you get stopped one might find themselves explaining why they feel the need. I also check the cities, because the ruling can and changes per incorporated area one may pass through.

  34. A more complete guide is the “Traveler’s Guide to the Firearms Laws of the Fifty States” published by the Second Amendment Foundation. It has a one page summary for each state of the laws that apply if you do or do not have a concealed carry license, how you may carry and transport a firearm, where you can and cannot carry, and other important information. I use it extensively, when I travel. Also, it is a good idea to check the web pages of the Department of Public Service (or its equivalent) if you have any doubts. I went so far, when traveling in Illinois, to email the local police department for clarification on some points. I got a reply from the Chief of Police, which I carried with me, when I went. Anyway, the Traveler’s Guide is available at http://www.saf.org/?shopp_product=travelers-guide-to-the-firearm-laws-of-the-fifty-states.

  35. Every gun owner in the country should start open carry

    HELL WE OUT GUN THEM !

    I for one am getting sick of

    FREEDOM STEALING LIBS & SEMI-CONSERVATIVES

  36. Your information on Virginia isn’t quite right.
    “However, in urban areas you cannot carry a centerfire handgun that holds more than 20 rounds.” – 3 things wrong here
    1 – It’s not just urban areas, it’s all of Virginia.
    2 – It’s only if the firearm is LOADED.
    3 – Concealed Handgun Permit holders are exempt (whether carrying concealed or open)

    •State law (§18.2-287.4) prohibits the carry by a non-CHP holder of a loaded:
    ◦semi-automatic center-fire rifle or pistol that is
    ◾equipped with a magazine that will hold more than 20 rounds of ammunition
    ◾or designed by the manufacturer to accommodate a silencer
    ◾or equipped with a folding stock
    ◦shotgun with a magazine that will hold more than seven rounds

    1. I’ll correct myself:

      However, this prohibition only applies in the following localities:
      ◦Cities of:
      ◾Alexandria
      ◾Chesapeake
      ◾Fairfax
      ◾Falls Church
      ◾Newport News
      ◾Norfolk
      ◾Richmond
      ◾Virginia Beach
      ◦Counties of:
      ◾Arlington
      ◾Fairfax
      ◾Henrico
      ◾Loudoun
      ◾Prince William

    2. I spend 99% of my time in 3 of them, but I have my Virginia CHP so it makes little difference to me. It also barely prohibits any handguns since most don’t hold more than 20 rounds, take a “silencer”(suppressor), or have a folding stock. You could even carry a loaded AR with a 20 round magazine, fixed stock and no threads on the barrrel. It’s just arbitrary restrictions that have little actual effect.

  37. Enough of this Anti-2nd Bullsh#$… All the states need to be like Vermont, and this Liberal game of jumping through hoops needs to end…

    I’m all for the 10th Amendment, but it should never trump the 2nd… If I have a concealed carry permit in my state, it should fly in any state… If I’m from Communist USA like CA, the law for the state I’m visiting should apply

    People need to be heard in public about our firearms, the inanimate objects made of plastic and steel that, much like a vehicle, just sit around by themselves and do nothing…

    The people that need to hear our message are the brain compromised people that believe the teleprompter reading news anchor is speaking the word of the gospel, when in fact it is a Psychological misinformation and disinformation campaign…

    What needs to be asked is “How, Do, Can, Will”???… Whether it’s a question for the board or a question to ask one’s self…

    ….HOW DO I get a petition backed by the GOA, NAGR and NRA printed up to give to people that will collect signatures outside sporting goods / gun stores???

    …..HOW MANY signatures do I need to qualify for a referendum on a state ballot???

    ….Do I need signatures in the first place, or just a majority vote by the state legislature???

    ….Can I get a special vote cast in session, but outside of an election year???

    ….HOW MUCH does a full page ad cost in a local newspaper???

    ….Is said newspaper bought and sold by gun grabbing groups, is it a supporter of the cause, or is it independent???

    ….Will a pro gun group front the costs for said newspaper ad with a truthful and educational message???

    ….How can I get an ad on TV???

    ….Does my state’s primary have referendums… ???

    The questions may or may not depend on the state, but playing this game, this outright denial of rights is pleasing only the Liberals (and some RINO’s)…

    That’s the start… For referendums on the general election, we have a year to get it good…

    Don’t forget… Liberals on the federal level often vote on our side IF THEIR TIME is about up… I don’t know much how it works on the state side, but I get the whole rundown because I pay the GOA and NAGR to keep me updated on the smoke and mirrors act…

    A Whole lot of Anti-Gun Senators met their end last November… I don’t have enough dirt on their replacements yet… I know exactly how Montana sits…

    In Montana, The MSSA (Montana Shooting Sports Association) helps… The Second Amendment Foundation is headquartered in WA State… The group in your state is called____

    As long as we continue to ask “Mother May I”, there basically isn’t a 2nd Amendment… I’m DONE dealing with Liberal trash rules… Nationwide concealed carry reciprocity, or better yet, the Vermont rule will not be accomplished by hoping our “leaders” vote the way we want them to…

    What is the easiest way to make lawmakers with a $$$$$$$$ salary nervous??? Dig up their past and fire off a respectful but very to the point reason why they will be replaced soon…

    This is grassroots… Don’t forecast it on the spy networks Facebook and Twitter etc… Email people in other states and ask them to organize volunteers to get votes pushed through… If it is on Facebook, they have time to prepare…

    Trojan Horse… They can’t defend what they think will never happen…

    The more people walking around legally armed the better… Project End Soft Zones, Project end school shootings, Project common sense

  38. I’d ask each of you to compare the regional differences in gun laws below. Keep in mind Mexico has no constitutional protection to bear arms, whereas the U.S. does…

    MEXICO: Entering Mexico with a firearm, or even a single round of ammunition, carries a penalty of up to five years in prison, even if the firearm or ammunition is taken into the country unintentionally.

    NEW JERSEY: Entering New Jersey with a firearm, or even a BB gun, carries a mandatory penalty of up to ten years in prison, even if the firearm or BB gun is taken into the state unintentionally.

    Final analysis – sadly I’d take my chances in Mexico over New Jersey any day.

    1. Wow. I grew up in the Commie State of South Jersey. Got my hunting license at age 9. Was raised around pistols, and rifles and of course shotguns( used for hunting). I never realized how bad Jersey was in the restriction of firearms until I was married and my wife was assaulted(attempted rape) and stalked afterwards. When I attempted to get a carry permit, the cops laughed. Told me to let the police handle it. I since have moved to Tennessee.

    2. @ Robert,

      My heart sank to hear that happened to your wife. As an LEA I am even more so ashamed to hear of the attitude of the police in NJ towards your situation… as well as so many others.

      I’m glad you moved to Tennessee. I travel frequently in my position and attend many joint agency law enforcement conferences. I can assure you the extremely restrictive mentality towards firearms by NJ LEOs is a regional and culture thing such is the case in areas of D.C. and CA.

      It will be hard to change such attitudes as we win more gun laws, but it can be done over time.

    3. Thank you for the kind words. After being told to ” let the police handle it”, I carried my 12 gauge pump loaded with 00 buck shot in my back seat for a week. Glad I didn’t get stopped. I would have went to prison for a while. The city in South Jersey was Millville, a couple miles from south of Vineland. My brother still lives there. There are shootings all the time now, as the city took “relocation” people from Camden and Trenton back in the mid 80’s. I would still carry if I ever decide to travel back there, as I would rather be judged by 12 than carried by six. Have a Blessed one.

  39. “Maryland
    Guns must be unloaded, cased and stored in an inaccessible area.”

    That’s a gamble, according to the MD State Police. I have a lockbox under the seat that’s inaccessible and that wasn’t good enough for them (question over the telephone). I’d hate to have to prove them wrong in court.

    1. Just open your engine compartment, and duct tape it to the air conditioner coolant lines. Don’t tell them you have it. Problem solved!

  40. Two states recognize Ohio permits but only issued after March 28 2015. Mine was renewed in 2013 and does not expire until 2018. Do I have to reapply? I should know but what happened in March?

  41. Colorado accepts Arizona and Florida permits but not the much more stringent Illinois permit – WTF? Same with Minnesota – they claim Illinois requirements aren’t up to their level when in fact they exceed MN’s requirements – a permit from the Democratic Peoples Republic of Illinois should be good anywhere

    1. Oh, and Florida must have an ego thing going on – not honoring Arizona (their biggest competitor for non resident permits) or Illinois?? Too many half assed liberal NYC transplants?

    2. Oops, also forgot to mention South Carolina – they accept Arizona and Florida but not Illinois – come on people!! And with all the folks from the Chicago area who vacation down their? Bad form!!

  42. I plan on taking my guns from Guam to WA state. Does anyone know the process of obtaining an FAID or if I have to wait a while?

    1. Ben, when traveling through the airlines, you can simply declare your firearms when you check in. No more than 4 firearms in a hard sided lockable case. Or you can get with an FFL Licensed holder on island to send it to another FFL in Washington State via USPS. These are the only two ways. FFL holders may charge you a fee and you will have to pay for shipping cost too that usually totals to around $100.

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