Washington State Loses 11,000 Carry Licenses in Four Months

By CTD Blogger published on in News

In a remarkable reversal of a long-standing trend, the number of active concealed pistol licenses in Washington State has dropped by 11,000 over the past four months, a fact that might (should) be alarming to gun rights groups. However, it may also suggest a return of lethargy in the firearms community. However, with the barrage of assaults on Second Amendment that seems very unlikely, which begs the question of “Why?”

By Dave Workman

Man lifting his shirt to show a concealed handgun

The news comes as Evergreen State gun rights activists are planning two events in Olympia, one week apart. There’s an April 14 event running 5:30–8:30 p.m., organized by the National Constitutional Coalition of Patriotic Americans, and on April 21, noon–3 p.m. there’s a “March For Our Rights” rally. Both of these events will be held on the Capitol steps.

At the end of November 2017, the Department of Licensing reported to Liberty Park Press that there were 591,366 active CPLs. Monday morning, the agency advised the number had dropped to 580,362 active licenses.

Since January 2, 2013—when the number of active CPLs hit 392,784—there has been a steady increase in the interest for acquiring a license to carry a concealed handgun, with but a few dips from month-to-month.

Washington has one of the more user—and constitution—friendly concealed carry laws, a “shall issue” provision that enables any qualified citizen to obtain a license to carry.

Article 1, Section 24 of the state constitution, adopted in November 1889, states, “The right of the individual citizen to bear arms in defense of himself, or the state, shall not be impaired, but nothing in this section shall be construed as authorizing individuals or corporations to organize, maintain or employ an armed body of men.”

In 1912, when Arizona joined the Union, its constitution adopted the same language. All but six other states have right-to-bear-arms provisions in their constitutions, and they appear to all be stronger than the wording of the Second Amendment. The Second Amendment was incorporated to the states via the Fourteenth Amendment in the 2010 Supreme Court ruling in McDonald v. City of Chicago, a case brought by the Bellevue-based Second Amendment Foundation.

Some members of the WaGuns.org forum have suggested that perhaps the state’s concealed carry interest reached the point of saturation. Others hinted that with taxes rising in many areas, people have had to choose between paying taxes or renewing their carry licenses. A few gun owners have suggested a number of reasons, including people who have died or moved out of the state.

The most dramatic decreases have come in King and Pierce counties, with more gradual declines in Snohomish, Clark, and Whatcom counties. The remaining counties all show smaller declines.

One other contributing factor might be harder to pin down. That’s the possible sense of safety from gun control with Donald Trump in the White House and Republicans in control of Congress. However, that hasn’t prevented the launching of a gun ban initiative in Oregon, and it would not stop one from being filed in Washington, as has been hinted earlier this year.

Why do you think Washington is losing carry license holders? Share your answer in the comment section.

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Comments (74)

  • Dave Christian

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    I gave up after realizing the time and effort required to get one. They are simply regulating us out.

    Reply

  • BRUCE Meier

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    I moved to King County in 1987 lived and worked there for 30 years and I finally got sick of all the overwhelmeing tax,s and add on,s for Seattle and the city dwellers that I moved back to the more even thinking Midwest . When 2 counties can vote Yes and the rest of the state votes no and it carries it was time for me to pack up and leave. I made my money and now I spend it in a away I choose not some special group chooses for me.Loved the state hated the people.

    Reply

  • Greg

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    Thank you for pointing out the improper use of “begs the question”. It is NOT the same as “raises the question”! It especially drives me nuts when journalists can’t get it right.

    I would be curious what the numbers look like here in Oregon. I’ve had my CCL license for almost 20 years. Our state government looks to be headed the way of the PRK (People’s Republik of Kalifornia) with more restrictions on gun rights. I hope voting Oregonians don’t allow it.

    Reply

  • tbloesch

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    Pure stupidity, if you think more anti gun laws will keep you safe, take a look at Chicago. Chicago has so many gun laws on the books, but they have more shootings than most major cities in America. Law abiding gun owners are not the ones involved in these shootings. Criminals don’t give a damn about all of your feel good gun laws, they don’t follow the law.

    Reply

  • Chuck

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    I think there is a reduction in CCP licenses because people are leaving the state, just like in California, to get away from the progressive jerks that have taken over the state government.

    Reply

  • Blue collar mom

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    I’m in Spokane and been thinking about getting mine. This article makes me want to get mine asap! 30 days wtf?

    Reply

  • Rod

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    A CCL is the same as gun registration!

    Reply

    • suemarkp

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      Not really. It is people registration (they figure you have at least one handgun), but they won’t know how many you have or their serial numbers. So you need to hide them well, especially anything bought before I594. It was I594 that created gun registration since that removed the ability to sell person-to-person without involving a dealer (any handguns that passes through a dealer in WA must be registered with the state), and so must handguns passed down from deceased people.

      Reply

    • Spencer

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      I have a strong tendency to agree with you. I’ve purchased only three firearms in the past 5 years. The remainder of my firearms were purchased over 40 years ago. I don’t want to be susceptible to confiscation of anything more more than those three. Hence, I don’t think I’ll get a CCL. Don’t need one for home defense.

      Reply

  • Brandon

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    I can’t even read your article, because you open improperly with “begs the question”. A phrase that has nothing to do with raising a question, which is what you really mean. If you’re going to be an advocate for our rights, be professional.

    Btw, I live in King County and renewed my CPL last month. Renewals are by appointment only, and it took a a few weeks to receive. The upside is they are now laminated cards. The clerk briefly mentioned that many people aren’t getting appointments in time to renew before they expire.

    Reply

  • Don

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    When I got my first CPL it cost $5.00 was good for 5 years and walk out the same day with it. After returning to Wa after many years I went to get one again it was now $50.00 and good for 3 yrs, and had to wait 30 days to get it. I do not know what the cost is now or the wait period is but bot could be a factor if the cost keeps going up.

    Reply

  • William Cale

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    It could be due in part to the anal nature of the liberals in the issuance of carry permits. We have a new sheriff in my county of NC that was appointed and is a liberal. He refused to reissue my permit and I haven’t even had a speeding ticket in 20 years. He dredged up a hospital stay from 40 years ago when I was in high school, said it was an involuntary commit( when it wasn’t), and refused to renew. I had a permit before, shoot competition, and have bought numerous firearms through the NICS procedure. If that was indeed the case I wouldn’t have had a CCP before, nor been able to purchase a firearm. Needless to say I’m appealing.

    Reply

    • Art

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      Unbelievable!! This sounds like a bad movie. All the best to you in your appeal with a great attorney!

      Reply

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