Video: Drawing Your Pistol in a Car

By Dave Dolbee published on in Safety and Training, Videos

There are those that do and those that do not, but guessing from the majority or comments The Shooter’s Log receives, I’d say most of us believe carrying a firearm means concealed. However, there are multiple ways to carry, both on your person and off body. In my vehicle, I have a holster between the seat and the console. I have also used a magnet or holster under the steering column. All of these methods carry advantages and disadvantages, but the reason I employed these solutions was a belief that I could not effectively draw my handgun from a waistband holster while seat belted.

Keeping a firearm in a holster connected to the seat offers the quickest draw time. However, once I am ready to get of the vehicle, the problem of safely and discreetly getting the weapon into a holster on my hip becomes problematic. I could carry one firearm in each location, but leaving a firearm, that exposed, in a vehicle does sit well either. Locking the vehicle firearm in a lockbox each time does not solve the problem of discretion.

There is, however, hope. I recently came across this video courtesy of the National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF) and the SIG Sauer Academy. After watching the video a few times, and a few hours of dry fire practice, I came to realize I could easily draw from an IWB or OWB holster with my seatbelt.

After watching the video, do you feel more confident drawing while wearing a seatbelt? Do you carry a firearm in a seat holster or under the steering column? Share your answers on opinions in the comment section.

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Comments (21)

  • Jon

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    I agree with a couple of the above comments. Quit assuming everyone is right handed and carrying on the right side. If you are going to give your professional opinion, please do it in a professional manner by covering all the carry scenarios. Otherwise, they did a good video for the right handed carriers.

    Reply

  • Commander@45

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    I usually have on t-shirts.While driving I uncover my weapon by placing my shirt between me and the gun. In Texas now that we have open carry I don’t care if they can see it from their vehicle,most likely not since I drive a pickup most of the time. Upon exiting the vehicle I slip my shirt over the weapon after I undo the seat belt. ALSO, I do not put my seat belt on in a parking lot until in motion!!!

    Reply

  • Suddenimpact

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    Hi Lost One. I hear you on the appendix carry issue in the vehicle. I also, generally carry in an appendix carry position with a Kimber 1911 .45 ACP in a Cross Breed holster.. I have had to adjust the “Kant Positions” just to be able to carry the weapon in that position walking normally. I am on the slim slide so not much padding to hide it. One of my solutions has been to carry 2 weapons, which has advantages and disadvantages. I feel that there are a lot more advantages to carrying 2 weapons than disadvantages (had 3 police officers in my family) which I won’t go into because that is not the real focus here. I have 2 other holsters that I use depending on what the temperature is outside, what I am wearing, etc. etc.. A shoulder holster (right cross draw with an open bottom to it) or an ankle holster I wear on my left ankle ( I carry a Springfield Armory P9 Mod. 2 Sub Compact, 16 round mag. with spare mag.). So the man in the video described lifting your left pant leg (with your left hand) , grabbing onto the steering wheel with your left hand, and then using that as a support while you remove your gun from your holster with your right hand ( I have practiced this before). With the shoulder holster version, here is what I do: I undo a couple of buttons on my shirt, and leave a nice sliding hole in my shirt, in case I need to slide my hand over to my holster. I have 2 options if my assailant is on my left. Only one option , if the he /she /zombie is on my right. On the left, I might be able to draw my pistol completely out of the holster, or if not, I might be able to lean my body to the right and fire through the bottom of my holster to the left as a last resort. Turning my head away from the window and flying glass. If my assailant is on my right, I have to get one of my guns out of the holster, no choice.

    Reply

  • lost one

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    shame appendix carry wasn’t addressed. it puts the gun right under the seat belt attachment and a good way to deal with it would have been appreciated

    Reply

    • Jeff

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      I appendix carry in public. In my vehicle, I carry in a holster wedged between the seat and console. When exiting the vehicle, I look around me, then transfer from the holster to my appendix carry holster and put the extra magazine in my pocket. This has served me well for a number of years.

      Reply

    • Tom H.

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      What I’ve seen people who carry AIWB do is (if your comfortable enough sitting with the gun in that position) is tuck their shirt and the seat belt behind the gun (and mag if you’re carrying a spare) and essentially open carry in the vehicle. Then when you go to get out of the car, you just pull your shirt over the gun/mag after you undo your seatbelt and you’re good to go.

      Reply

  • James Harris

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    All very interesting but my strong side is my left. Any suggestions for that?

    Reply

    • Spencer

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      Get an European car with the steering wheel on the right??

      Reply

    • Roy

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      On the left is a little bit easier to draw, I’m a left handed as well, I’ve practiced it and it is much easier.

      Reply

  • Mark

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    The best solution I have found to a seat belted draw is to use the right holster for the right problem! My solution was to implement the use of a holster known as “The Carjacker” made by (IMO) the best individual holster manufacturer, Sam Andrews, owner of Andrews Custom Leather. I personally only use his holsters (for the 35 years) for all my carry applications, with the exception of my L.E.O. duty rigs. The “Carjacker” offers the best solution, for comfort and accessability of weapon of any holster I have found….Great stakeout holster too. Check it out on his website: Andrews Custom Leather.

    Reply

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