Posts Tagged ‘U.S. Law Shield’

U.S. Law Shield Protect Thy Neighbor video cover

Deadly Force to Protect Your Neighbor — Is it Legal?

Many of know about the use of force or deadly force when it applies to ourselves or immediate loved ones. However, the question of whether that protection applied a neighbor or total stranger was recently posed on The Shooter’s Log. For legal matters it is always best to consult an attorney, so U.S. Law offered the solution.

Top 5 Gun Law Misconceptions

U.S. Law Shield Video: Top 5 Gun Law Misconceptions

The law can be very broad, widely interpreted and often misunderstood. Don’t find yourself in a situation where your misinterpretation causes you to go from singing Auld Lang Syne to Jailhouse Rock. In the following series of videos, U.S. Law Shield Program Attorneys discuss the top 5 gun law misconceptions for specific states.

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Video: How to Trick Out Your Gun (Without Going to Jail)

Half the fun of firearms is the time spent at the range making brass, the rest is finding new ways to make your gun look cool, or more importantly, more functional. However, with the patchwork of laws across various states, adding so much as a single accessory could land you on the wrong side of the law and jeopardize your Second Amendment rights. Here are a handful of videos, specific to individuals states, to keep you within legal bounds. However, even if your state is not covered in the videos, the videos are a great starting point to determine the right questions you’ll need answered before buying the latest gadget or piece of furniture for you firearm.

U.S. Law Shield Guns and School Zones video cover

Video: Guns and School Zones — What is the Law?

Many of us have school-age children. This makes balancing their safety while not running afoul of the law difficult for the majority of us who carry a firearm. Every state is different. Unfortunately, we can cover them all, but this article is a good primer. If you are not fortunate enough to call yourself a Texan, at a minimum, U.S. Law Shield will give you dependable advice and the questions you need to be answering for your state’s laws.

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Video: U.S. Law Shield — Self-Defense With a Shovel

Although many have adopted 24/7 carry to protect themselves or family members, whether in the home or on the road, there are times you may still find yourself unarmed. Other circumstances, such as a malfunction, may leave you searching for the nearest thing you can grab to defend yourself. This is a case where the nearest tool happened to be a shovel. In this video, U.S. Law Shield offers guidance on how to handle any the confrontation—after surviving the encounter.

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Gunshot Wounds — Are You Prepared?

What comes to your mind when you think of first aid? Is it CPR? Or perhaps the Heimlich maneuver? Both are lifesaving skills that everyone should know. But have you ever thought about what happens when someone is bleeding out from a gunshot wound? If you were faced with this scenario would you know what to do?

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Top 5 States to Avoid with Firearms

Just because it is the holidays, does not mean we can let our guard down. In fact, traveling to areas you are not as familiar with, crowded shopping malls, or on significant holidays all raise the threat from the everyday criminal as well as the lone wolf attacker. As a result, sadly, we need to be more vigilant and ready to take responsibility for our own safety. However, crossing state lines could land you an invite for Christmas dinner in the pokey. Here’s a list of the top five states to avoid while carrying with firearms, along with a handful of (dis)honorable mentions.

U.S. Law Shield Active Shooter Video cover

Video: Should You Be the Good Samaritan?

The reason most start carrying a concealed weapon is self-protection, with the protection of those around you as a close second. When those around you are your loved ones, and the people whose lives or health is being threatened, it is a fairly easy decision of when to get involved. However, when the threat is merely in your vicinity, or the threat is too strangers, the decision becomes much more blurry. This is true in the individual’s mind and the mind of the courts or legal letter of the law.

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NJ SAFE 2A Event to Be Held on Cusp of Gubernatorial Vote

With President Trump in the White House, the fight for the Second Amendment is going to happen at the local level. This makes it much harder for national Second Amendment groups such as the NRA-ILA or NAGR to fight. However, we have the power of the vote and grassroots efforts such as the New Jersey Second Amendment Firearms Education (NJ SAFE).

Emily Taylor, an attorney at the law firm of Walker & Byington and a Texas Law Shield attorney

U.S. Law Shield: Can I Use Force Against Someone Burglarizing My Car?

What can you do if someone is breaking into your vehicle while you’re at your house? Well, first of all, in case you were wondering what this crime is called, it’s burglary of a motor vehicle. Now, that’s what makes this discussion interesting, because as you may already know, you can have the right to respond with deadly force when someone is committing a burglary against your property. The problem here is that the statute only reads burglary, and there are multiple different kinds of burglary in the state of Texas.

U.S. Law Shield

Video: As Temperatures Go Up in Texas, So Does Road Rage

A recent national television report asserted that road-rage incidents are becoming more common and more deadly. One of the latest incidents took place in Pennsylvania, in which a man is alleged to have shot and killed a teenage girl during a traffic merge. Click to watch level-headed advice from your Independent Program Attorney about what to do—and what not to do—in these situations.

Hello, my name is Edwin Walker. I’m an Independent Program Attorney with Texas Law Shield.

I want to talk to you today about an issue that we see on a daily basis. In fact, you will encounter it on a daily basis—the subject of road rage. I am sure that you have all seen road rage. You may have actually been involved in a road rage incident.

Now, if you’re a responsible gun owner, I’m going to give you a few words of advice on how to react when you find yourself in one of these unfortunate road-rage incidents. While on the roadways, we all observe something that makes us upset, whether it’s poor driving, unsafe driving, or just simply somebody being very discourteous.

By all means, you should restrain yourself from engaging that person and telling them how bad their actions were because this can be perceived as an act of road rage. If you’re a lawful gun owner and have a firearm in your vehicle, you do not want to be viewed as the aggressor in a road-rage situation.

Now, about a situation where an individual has chosen to rage against you, and you are the actual victim of road rage, if you and the other individuals are still in their automobiles, do not use your firearm to respond to any of the rager’s activities. This is because law enforcement views the fact that you’re both still safely in your metal boxes as removing any threat of immediacy that you may be harmed.

So please, if you have a gun, and somebody is raging against you, forget that you have a gun, don’t display it, don’t brandish it, don’t show it, don’t point it, and for God’s sake, don’t fire it. This could result in a lot of trouble for you. Now let’s look at a situation where a road rage incident has escalated to the point where one of the participants has actually gotten out of their vehicle. We recommend that you stay in your vehicle at all times. Do not exit your vehicle because the person who left their vehicle is going to be looked at as the aggressor.

If the other individual has exited his or her vehicle and the person is not in contact with your vehicle, and they do not have a weapon, then do not feel that you can display your weapon in the act of self-defense. People are allowed to just simply stand there and scream at you—scream whatever they want—until they make a demonstrative effort to try to harm you. There is no immediate threat that would justify displaying or shooting or brandishing your firearm.

Now, if the person shows a weapon, in particular, a firearm, the existence of a weapon would give you reasonable belief that there was an immediate threat of harm that would justify an act of force or deadly force.

Even in this situation, I would be very cautious. Now, if this situation escalates even further, where the person has actually made physical contact with your vehicle, whether they are beating on it with an instrument with their fists or they’re attempting to open your door, this would give you the facts that you would need to show that you had a reasonable belief that that individual is unlawfully and forcefully attempting to either enter your vehicle or remove you from your vehicle. This is very very important because this falls under what is commonly known in Texas as the Castle Doctrine.

The Castle Doctrine provides that an individual is given a presumption of reasonableness if they use force or deadly force in a situation where they believe that the person is unlawfully and forcefully either attempting to enter their occupied vehicle or remove somebody from their occupied vehicle. This legal presumption can be very very important because this legal presumption then says that you are allowed to use force or deadly force in response to this other individual’s actions.

We want to keep you safe out on the roadway, so keep these words of advice in mind and try to have a little less road rage out there. If we have a little less road rage, maybe we’ll have a safer world.

Have you ever been involved in a road rage incident? What happened? Was a firearm involved? Share your answers in the comment section.

Check out these other great articles from U.S. Law Shield and click here to become a member:

The “purple paint law” became official in Texas on September 1, 1997. The law doesn’t appear to be common knowledge for every hunter in the Lone Star State, even though Texas hunting regulations describe it.

Can your employer restrict your ability to carry firearms at the workplace? Click to watch Emily Taylor, Independent Program Attorney with Walker & Byington, explain that in Texas, employers call the shots regarding workplace self-defense.

In this excerpt from a U.S. Law Shield News live report, watch Emily Taylor, independent program attorney with Walker & Byington, discuss the ground rules for carrying firearms into restaurants and bars. Click the video below to find out the significant differences between blue signs and red signs in Texas establishments, and how getting those colors crossed up could lead to some orange jumpsuit time.   If you would like to see these reports live on Facebook, click here to join the Texas Law Shield Facebook page and sign up for live notifications.