Posts Tagged ‘S&W .500’

Big Honkin’ Revolvers

They don’t call these bad boys hand cannons for nothing.

S&W Model 500 Revolver .500 S&W

S&W Model 500 Revolver .500 S&W

S&W Model 500 Revolver .500 S&W

This is definitely the granddaddy of all big honkin’ revolvers. Smith & Wesson says it is the “most powerful production revolver in the world today.” I asked the guys around the office if any of them have shot the .500 S&W and of course CTD Mike speaks up: “Yes. I held on very tightly.” I have no shame in saying that I have not tried the Smith & Wesson 500, although I haven’t had the chance anyway. Historically, S&W pushes the envelope in developing big handgun calibers, but since the 1960s, the .454 Casull overshadowed them. S&W unveiled the .500 S&W in 2007 and Cor-Bon made the round. They designed it for North American heavy, dangerous game. A hunter reportedly used a .500 S&W to shoot the controversial “Pigzilla.” As the story goes, 11-year old Jamison Stone shot the pig nine times before getting a kill shot.

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Ruger New Model Super Blackhawk .44 Remington Magnum

Ruger New Model Super Blackhawk .44 Remington Magnum

Ruger New Model Super Blackhawk .44 Remington Magnum

Outdoor Life named the Ruger Super Blackhawk one of the 50 Best Guns Ever Made. The movie Dirty Harry made the S&W Model 29 and the .44 Remington Magnum calibers a hot commodity in 1970s. Ruger’s Super Blackhawk was the more affordable answer to those who didn’t want to fork out the cash for the Model 29. Ruger released the original single-action Blackhawk revolver in 1955, with the .44 Magnum versions becoming available in 1956. The “new model” Ruger revolvers incorporated new safety features and started production in 1973. In 2000, Ruger introduced a new action and steel injector housing to the Ruger New Super Blackhawk. It has a ginormous 10-1/2 inch barrel, making the Ruger New Model Super Blackhawk a whopping 16-5/8 inches overall. It holds six rounds with Western-style rosewood grips and a ramp front and adjustable rear sights.

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Taurus Model 608 .357 Magnum

Taurus Model 608 .357 Magnum

Taurus Model 608 .357 Magnum

The .357 Magnum caliber isn’t as a hard-hitter as the .44 Magnum or the .500 S&W, but it ain’t no wuss either. The Taurus Model 608 holds eight rounds of this massive caliber as well! The 608 revolver features an eight-inch ported barrel. The porting helps reduce recoil and muzzle climb. The Taurus Model 608 has a large steel frame and black rubber grips for comfortable shooting. There is a fixed front and an adjustable rear sight.

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Magnum Research BFR .45-70 Gvt

Magnum Research BFR .45-70 Gvt

Magnum Research BFR .45-70 Gvt

A caliber usually found in lever-action, big game hunting revolvers, Magnum Research’s BFR (Big Freakin’ Revolver) is a stupid big anti-bear cannon. Originally made by Springfield Armory, the .45-70 Government has been around since 1873. The .45-70 Government is an excellent North American big game caliber, as it the round has a somewhat low velocity. It has also been popular with hunters who have the opportunity to hunt in Africa. The Magnum Research BFR in .45-70 has a 10-inch barrel and an overall length of 17.5 inches. It comes with a scope mount and fixed front and an adjustable rear sight.

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S&W Model 29 Classic Revolver .44 Magnum

S&W Model 29 Classic Revolver .44 Magnum

S&W Model 29 Classic Revolver .44 Magnum

Originally, when I started this post, I purposely was going to leave out the S&W Model 29. However, I concluded that it wasn’t fair to exclude the one revolver that started the whole stinkin’ big revolver thang. So here it is, Dirty Harry’s “go ahead make my day” S&W Model 29, .44 Magnum revolver.

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Five Ultimate American Firearms

We all love American designed, American made firearms. Thank goodness that even in these times of outsourcing and globalization, there are still plenty of American guns to choose from. Here are five outstanding examples that are some of the best of the best at what they do.

870 Marine Magnum

870 Marine Magnum

870 Marine Magnum—Shiny but Deadly

The iconic 870 is the best-selling shotgun in history, with over ten million produced. Of course there are a bunch of different models at different pricing levels, but the whole point of a pump shotgun is to be tough, am I right? The king of tough 870s might be the Marine Magnum. The silver finish is electroless nickel plating that covers all metal parts, even internally. This gives the Marine Magnum unmatched corrosion resistance; they are often found on boats and ships operating in salt water. Even if you aren’t going to be fishing off the coast of Alaska, its nice to know that you can buy an 870 Marine Magnum and it will last the rest of your life.

Dan Wesson Valor

Dan Wesson Valor

Dan Wesson Valor—You may not understand, until you shoot one.

In my opinion there’s no firearm more American than a 1911 in .45acp. One of the best values in 1911s is the Dan Wesson Valor. “Best value, at over $1,600? How is that possible?” I hear you say. “My $500 1911 does just fine!” The Valor is similar to a $500 1911 in the same way that a Dodge Viper is similar to a minivan. They both have an engine in front and four tires made of rubber, so what’s the difference? When you put a Valor in your hands and fire a magazine down range, its like getting behind the wheel of a 500 horsepower muscle car for the first time. Sure it costs more, but value is about what you get for the money. One online reviewer managed a 1.18 inch wide, five shot group from his Valor at 25 yards using quality Hornady ammunition. Vrooom!

Colt SP6920 MOE

Colt 6920 MOE

Colt SP6920 MOE—Larry and Curly not included, nyuk nyuk nyuk!

There are many brands of AR-15 rifle made in the USA, but none has such a rabid fan base as Colt. They like to say “If its not a Colt, it’s a copy” and brag about how the Colt 6920 is as close as you can get to a military M4 carbine. The thing is, they are pretty much right about that. Colt is now making a “6920 MOE” version that comes from the factory with a pistol grip, forend, forward pistol grip, rear sight, and collapsible stock made by MagPul, another American company that has earned a huge number of fans. If you happen to be both a Colt fan and a Magpul fan, the SP6920 MOE combination is only a hundred bucks more than a standard 6920, giving you a big cost savings over buying the regular rifle and upgrading it with the same parts. What’s more American than that?

S&W 500

S&W 500

S&W 500—They make 700 grain bullets for this pistol. Really.

Smith & Wesson is another American company with a long and proud heritage. They lost their way in the 1990s and many gun owners boycotted them after Smith and Wesson made a rotten “smart gun” deal with the Clinton Administration. The boycott was effective and caused the company’s owners to sell it at a huge loss. The new ownership brought a new attitude with them, building the S&W .500, the largest caliber production revolver in history. Anti-gun people went bonkers, claiming that the .500 could be used to shoot down airplanes and such. Pro-gun folks looked at how angry the anti-gunners were with S&W and decided to end the boycott. So how big is the .500, really? A complete .44 Magnum cartridge will drop straight through the chambers of its cylinder, rim and everything! This may be the most powerful handgun ever produced in large numbers— the BATFE has declared that any pistol with a larger bullet diameter would be a “destructive device” requiring registration similar to owning a machine gun.

Barrett M82A1 .416

Barrett M82A1 .416

Barrett M82A1 .416—This rifle is as long as your couch. God bless America!

California banned .50 bmg-chambered firearms in 2004. When Governor Arnold Schwartzenegger signed the bill into law, Ronnie Barrett publicly announced that he would no longer sell to, or service .50 calibers in possession by, California law enforcement agencies, which had pushed for the ban claiming that the .50 cals were “a terrorist threat” while ordering more of the same rifles for themselves. A year later, Barrett released the .416 cartridge, an ‘improvement” on the .50—yet still legal in California. Using a computer-designed bullet shape for maximum aerodynamic efficiency, the 400 grain .416 bullet sits in a necked down .50 cal casing until it leaves the muzzle at over 3,000 feet per second, and 2,000 yards downrange it is still supersonic and stable. At first the .416 could only be had in the bolt-action M99, but now Barrett is chambering the mighty semi-automatic M82A1 for this long-range monster. Barrett started with a banned caliber and replaced it with a legal caliber actually offering an improvement in effective range, causing the anti-gunners to wring their little hands and crap their little all-natural organic fiber underpants.  That’s really what makes the .416 M82A1 so uniquely American.