Posts Tagged ‘SIG SAUER’

Autoloaders: .22 Rifle Edition

There have been many different autoloading rifles chambered for the extraordinarily popular and inexpensive .22 Long Rifle cartridge over the years. A few stand out as the leaders of the pack. Autoloading .22s fall into one of two design categories: traditional or modern.

Traditional Designs

Browning SA-22 Grade 1

Browning SA-22 Grade 1

The Browning SA-22 is one of the first autoloading .22 rifles ever produced. Production started in 1914, by FN Herstal in Belgium, and continues today in various countries, depending on the Grade level. The rifle’s takedown design features a slim and stylish receiver and barrel, and requires no tools to separate the two compact halves. There are several different Grade levels and options currently available, and many more offered since its introduction. Since 1914, the number of SA-22s sold has exceeded over half a million.

Introduced in 2006, the Mossberg 702 Plinkster is a lightweight, rugged, and reliable. It features an aluminum receiver with grooves for mounting a scope, free-floating barrel, and a bolt hold-open function. There are several versions available, featuring different stocks, colors, and finishes.

The Remington 597, introduced in 1997, is built in Remington’s Mayfield, Kentucky manufacturing plant. It features a free-floating barrel and a unique bolt-guidance system that uses two steel guide rails for added stability, reliability, and greater accuracy. Although it is not the most popular of the autoloading .22 rifles, there are several models available, as well as many different aftermarket parts and accessories.

Ruger 10-22

Ruger 10/22

Ruger hit the jackpot when they released the 10/22. It is arguably the most prolific autoloading .22 rifle on the planet. Since its introduction in 1964 more than a million of these rifles have seen action. The 10/22 is well-suited for target shooting, plinking, and small game hunting. It is well-balanced, rugged, reliable, and accurate. Though it is available in a wide variety of configurations from the factory, the aftermarket scene is where you will find a massive amount of accessories and replacement parts. In fact, you can find an aftermarket version of every part of the rifle, allowing you to create a 100% custom 10/22.

Team Cheaper than Dirt Match Report

Match season is almost here, and this past weekend I shot my first USPSA Production match since August of 2009 – the good news is that all the practice I’ve done in the past year and a half has really improved my shooting. The bad news is that my hat-cam went down and ate all my footage, meaning that I’ve only got one stage to show you a clip from for Down Zero TV. This was my final stage of the day, Stage 3. Here are the results from that stage.  I finished 4th on that stage, and since position 1 and 2 were both GMs, I don’t feel too bad about that. Video from the match is to the right.

Results: 6th place, and I shot 75% of the GM that won the match.  For my first Production match of the season and first match using the new P250, I’m pretty happy with that result.

The match itself was very good, the crew at Paul Bunyan puts together good, well designed stages.  Lots of options, some challenging shots, and lots and lots of steel were the theme at this match, and many shooters (myself included) paid the price for trying to machine gun the steel.

Guns and Gear

The Sig P250 continues to run well; as I mentioned on Gun Nuts I’m getting a short trigger for the gun which should decrease the trigger reach and allow me to get slightly faster follow up shots.  My splits were a little slow at this match; I noticed trigger fatigue setting in on a couple of the longer field stages where I had to pull the trigger 30+ times.  Obviously, I need to build up my trigger pull strength with more dry fire.

I used two different types of ammo for this match, a mix of S&B 115 grain FMJ and PMC 115 gr FMJ.  No issues with the rounds, everything performed reliably and accurately in the gun.  As an aside, this is the first gun I’ve had that really runs S&B ammo well; I’ve avoided it for years in other guns, but the Sig P250 eats it up no problems.

This weekend, I’ll shooting my first IDPA match as part of Down Zero TV; this footage will part of the premiere episode of Down Zero TV as well.  Hatcams, 3rd person, and even more importantly the commentary to tie it all together.  The goal for this weekend’s match will be to shoot the entire match clean; barring that I’ll shoot the match with as few points down as possible.

Happy 1911 Day

On March 29, AD 1911 the U.S. Army officially adopted the Colt 1911 pistol as its official sidearm. The 1911 was originally issued in an era where the Army still had cavalry and was not too far removed from the days when a single action Colt revolver with a 7 inch barrel had been their primary sidearm. When the Colt SAA was replaced in the late 1800s with a double action revolver in .38 Long Colt, there were many who felt that such a decision was the wrong one. During the Philippine-American War, the .38 Long Colt proved ineffective at “bad-breath” fight distances, prompting the Army to seek a replacement. John Moses Browning, who is likely the greatest gun designer ever scaled up his .38 ACP pistol to a .45 caliber cartridge of his design and submitted that pistol to the military trials.

The 1911 wasn’t really born in 1911, though. The pistol trials that it competed in started in 1906, where the Browning design competed against a .45 ACP Luger and the Savage .45 ACP. The Browning designed “1911” eventually won the trials and was selected as the Army’s new service pistol, officially adopted on March 29th, 1911. The 1911 served in World War I and various other conflicts, including notably in the hands of Medal of Honor recipient Herman Hanneken, who used a 1911 to kill a rebel leader during the US occupation of Haiti.

In 1924, the 1911 received some minor design changes; this resulted in the new designation of 1911A1. The 1911A1 pistols continued to serve the US military until the 1980s, when it was officially phased out in favor of the Beretta M9. But the design would not go quietly into the night remaining in service in the US military with Special Forces, Force Recon Marines, and other specialized units. Sig 1911 The modern 1911 continues to serve to this day; the Sig Sauer 1911 Tactical Operations at right is an excellent example of what the 1911 has become. The sights are much better than the original sights, the features a rail for attaching lights and other accessories, and hammer bite has been eliminated. John Moses Browning’s great design continues to serve with LAPD SWAT, FBI regional SWAT teams, and even in the holsters of local law enforcement agencies that desire the ergonomics and shootability of the classic design. 100 years later, the 1911 is going strong, with no indication that it won’t still be around in another 100 years. I’m wearing one as I type this, and I wonder how many people are going to be wearing one while they read this post.

SIG716 Prec Marksman

SIG SAUER’s SIG716 7.62×51 NATO

The SIG 556 Russian wasn’t the only new exciting rifle unveiled by Sig Sauer at the 2011 SHOT Show: The new SIG716 rifle chambered in 7.62 NATO was on display at their booth at the Sands Expo and Convention Center. Four different models were shown; a standard carbine model with a 14.5″ barrel, a 16″ patrol version, a longer and heavier precision marksman model, and a NFA regulated SBR model for CQB with a 12.5″ barrel. All of the models accept standard 7.62×51 MagPul PMAGs and are shipped with these direct from the factory.

Black SIG SAUER 556R with the barrel pointed to the right on a white background.

SIG SAUER 556 Russian

SIG SAUER came clean with the 556 and owned up to its Kalishnakov roots with their new 556R. The 556 rifle has always had an AK-style action, which contributes greatly to the reliability of Sig’s rifle platform, but now Sig has released a 7.62×39 caliber version that is compatible with standard AK-47 magazines.

Black barreled, brown gripped SIG SAUER P210 Legend on a white-to-gray background, barrel pointed to the left

SIG SAUER P210 Legend

Arguably the finest service pistol ever made, the original SIG SAUER P210 is a legend in its own right. Capable of shooting a 1″ group at 50 yards, the pistol is highly sought after by target shooters around the world. For more than 25 years, the future has looked bleak for the P210 after production ceased in 1985. But not anymore.