Posts Tagged ‘Ruger Handguns’

Performance Center Ported M&P Shield pistol

By the Numbers: America’s Top 5 Pistols

If there is one thing I love, it is a good debate over which gun is best. The regulars all make the list, and that is fine, but the creativity and opinions of the readers is really what’s eye opening and makes it a good a read for me. That being said, this list is strictly based on the numbers, so it is perfect fodder for a good shredding—do your worst.

Ruger MK IV recall notice

Ruger Mark IV Recall

Ruger recently discovered that all Mark IV pistols (including 22/45 models) manufactured prior to June 1, 2017 have the potential to discharge unintentionally if the safety is not utilized correctly. In particular, if the trigger is pulled while the safety lever is midway between the “safe” and “fire” positions (that is, the safety is not fully engaged or fully disengaged), then the pistol may not fire when the trigger is pulled. However, if the trigger is released and the safety lever is then moved from the mid position to the “fire” position, the pistol may fire at that time.

Traditions revolver with a box or SIG Sauer V-Crown ammunition

Review: SIG Sauer Big Bore Defense Loads — .44 Special and .45 Colt

Recently, SIG Sauer broadened its line of defensive ammunition with two big bore revolver loads. The .44 Special V-Crown and .45 Colt V-Crown offer good choices for personal defense. Before we look at the performance of each load we should look at the cartridges. The .45 Colt is the older cartridge, introduced in 1873. The .45 Colt has been loaded with different weight bullets but traditional performance is a 255-grain conical load at about 850 fps in most revolvers.

LC380 with Crimson Trace

Ruger Announces New Models for 2014!

It’s a good thing the jolly red elf has not finished his rounds yet, because Christmas lists need to be revised ASAP! The good folks at Ruger just released the new additions for 2014 and there seems to be a little something to top every shooter’s wish list.

S&W 22a

.22 LR Competition Pistols: What to Buy, What Not to Buy

With ammo costs going up and availability going down, many shooters are turning to the good old .22 Long Rifle cartridge for affordable shooting fun. Rimfire competition shooting leagues are springing up across the country. New shooters are mastering the fundamentals of marksmanship. Experienced shooters are rediscovering that .22 LR competitions are a fun way to hone their skills to a fine edge. So, what should we look for in a competition .22 pistol?

The Ruger SR9c: Gun Review

Ruger’s SR9c has been available on the market for some time now, and we’ve taken that time to put our test model through some rigorous testing on the range and through day-to-day concealed carry.

A smaller version of the popular SR9, the SR9c has a smaller grip and a slightly shorter barrel and slide, making it more suitable for concealment under light clothing. Fans of Ruger’s full size SR9 will appreciate the SR9c that much more, as it basically follows the same form and function of it’s big brother.

Features of the SR9c

Our SR9c arrived from Ruger in a nice hard plastic case and included the pistol, a gun lock, one 10 round magazine and one 17 round magazine, as well as grip extensions. This all inclusive package is the right move by Ruger. Other manufacturers offer extended capacity magazines and grip extensions, but Ruger includes this as a standard part of the SR9c, making it that much more of a value. Why spend hundreds of dollars on a handgun and then have to go spend hundreds more on the accessories that should have been included with the pistol?


The SR9c with various grip configurations.

There are three types of grips and baseplates you can use with the SR9c. Both magazines include standard flat baseplates, although the 17-round extended magazine has a polymer sleeve that fits over the portion of the mag that protrudes from the grip, providing you ergonomics similar to a larger full-sized handgun. The baseplate on the smaller 10-round magazine can be removed and replaced with an grip extension that provides room for an additional finger to wrap around and further stabilize the pistol. Having just one more finger on the grip helps to enhance recoil control on the already soft-shooting pistol.

Like the SR9, the ergonomics of the SR9c are  enhanced with the inclusion of a reversible backstrap so you can customize the grip. The textured backstrap is easy to remove by simply pushing out a pin located on the bottom of the grip. The backstrap then slides out the bottom and can be reversed to reveal a palm-filling swell that will better fit those of you with larger hands.

The pistol itself is available in all-black or two-tone finish. The two-tone model sports a stainless steel slide, while the all-black model has an alloy steel slide covered with Ruger’s proprietary Nitrodox Pro finish. Both models weigh in the same at just over 23 ounces unloaded.

The SR9c comes with factory installed 3-dot sights which are dead-on right out of the box. The front sight is drift-adjustable for windage, and the rear sight is elevation-adjustable using a small screw. Despite the small size of this pistol, it is incredibly accurate out past 7 yards: the typical distance for a concealable defensive pistol. Groups were usually under 4 inches when shooting off-hand. Recoil is light and easily managed, and the pistol is easy to get back on target for quick follow-up shots. As expected, the handgun performed flawlessly on the range, digesting 115 grain 9mm BVAC ball ammunition with nary a hiccup.

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Like the larger SR9, the SR9c is loaded with safety features that users have come to expect from Ruger. An ambidextrous manual frame mounted safety, magazine disconnect, internal trigger bar disconnect and a striker block safety all combine to ensure that the pistol will not fire unless properly loaded and the trigger pulled. A large orange chamber-loaded indicator lets you easily see and feel when the gun is loaded.

Disassembly of the SR9c is fairly straightforward.

  1. Lock the slide back to the rear and ensure that the chamber is clear.
  2. Press down the ejector into the magazine well.
  3. Using a non-marring tool press out the take-down lever.
  4. Carefully pull back the slide and then ease it forward off of the frame rails.
  5. Compress and remove the dual captive recoil springs and the barrel simply drops out afterwards.
  6. Reassemble in the reverse order of disassembly.

Ruger SR9c Specifications

  • Caliber: 9mm Luger
  • Frame: Polymer
  • Sights: Adjustable 3-dot
  • Rifling: 1:10 twist, right hand
  • Capacity: 10 rounds (standard) 17 rounds (extended)
  • Trigger Pull: 5 pounds
  • Weight: 23.2 ounces
  • Barrel Length: 3.5″
  • Overall Width: 0.9″
  • Overall Length: 6.85″
  • Overall Height: 4.61″

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Have you used the SR9c? Share your thoughts in the comments section.