Posts Tagged ‘Rimfire Ammunition’

SHOT Show 2014 Special Edition Day 4: New Ammo

Cheaper Than Dirt! staffers covering the 2014 SHOT Show in Las Vegas have filed their final reports on new ammunition and accessories introduced at the show. Here’s a look at what 2014 has to offer from Winchester, including a simplified line of W Train & Defend loads; dedicated 3-Gun offerings; and Shot-Lok technology in the new Long Beard turkey load.

SHOT 2014 — Norma-USA Expands U.S. Caliber Offerings

Norma-USA Expands U.S. Caliber Offerings of its High Quality American PH Hunting Bullets and Superior Brass Components.

Norma USA, has created quite a buzz with the announcement regarding the expansion to its American PH and brass components. In 2012, Norma Precision expanded it high performance offerings to the United States and hunters have taken full advantage of Norma’s double-diameter expansion and deep, terminal penetration.

A black Ruger .22/45, barrel pointed down, with 2 boxes of ammunition against a wooden background.

Why Buy the .22 Long Rifle Cartridge?

A proven resource in creating a marksman is the use of inexpensive .22 caliber ammunition and .22 caliber firearms. The rimfire offers little or no recoil, minimal report and good accuracy. It is recognized that the rimfire is a good training aid for pure marksmanship, that is trigger control and learning sight alignment and sight picture. In today’s tight economy, we see both .22 caliber conversions and dedicated .22 caliber firearms pressed into service in training. With the high, and increasing, costs of training, .22 caliber conversion units and .22 caliber firearms appear to be a good buy.

The Doe Run plant is located in eastern Missouri. Image credit: Wikipedia.

Getting the Lead Out — of the Entire U.S.?

Doe Run Company’s primary lead smelter based in Herculaneum, Missouri — the last such facility in the United States — is scheduled to close in December. The Herculaneum smelter is currently the only smelter in the United States which can produce lead bullion from raw lead ore that is mined nearby in Missouri’s extensive lead deposits, giving the smelter its “primary” designation, according to NRA-ILA. So, will consumers eventually feel this shutdown at the retail level — for example, reduced supplies of bullet components, higher prices, or more alternative bullet alloys?

4 338-Lapua-Hornady

Top 10 Ammo Posts as of May 25, 2013

The biggest fixed expenses when getting into the gun game are usually firearms, then optics, or sometimes the other way around. But over the lifetime of a platform — rifle, shotgun, handgun, doesn’t matter — the biggest expense is almost always ammo. Accordingly, stories focusing on ammunition use, tuning, and suitability are favorites of the Cheaper Than Dirt! Chronicle community. Here are the most-read articles we’ve run in the Shooter’s Log that have to do with ammunition choice and performance:

TAURUS-M94B2UL-22LR-sights

At the Range with a Trio of Wheelguns

I recently had a chance to handle and fire three rimfire revolvers I may buy, either new or slightly used. I’m fond of wheelguns because they’re easy to maintain on a day-by-day basis, and I understand what usually goes wrong with them, which is not much. Also, I try to bring new folks into the gun culture as opportunities present themselves, and having a stable of easy-to-shoot revolvers is often a great way to do that. Here’s how this trio performed at the range.

Rimfire Has New Life

SHOT 2013 Preview: Winchester .17 Super Magnum, .17 WSM

Rimfire is not for just plinking anymore. Just 20 grains at 3,000 feet per second—lets do this! I have never been a big fan of the .17 caliber in any form. If I want a varmint gun and caliber, I am going for the .223 Remington. That has now changed. That my friends is almost 400 ft-lbs from a 20-grain bullet. That is a serious varmint round in a rimfire cartridge no less. With the skyrocketing price of .223 everywhere, due to its many applications, a new varmint cartridge has come at the right time.

VisiColor target with 10 shot-group

Trigger Time Feedback

If you want to improve your shooting skills the Army has a plan that may help. Fundamentals are fundamentals and not much has changed over the past century. Circa 1904, the U.S. Army’s shooting manual stated something along the following lines, “Before any practice on the range is commenced, at least a month of dry-fire practice is required.” Not much has changed in the last century—shooters didn’t do enough of it then, and they still don’t.

eley sport 7-EL22SP

GIGO Rules in .22 Ammo

If you haven’t lot-tested rimfire ammo in your 22 LR rifle, then GIGO will certainly bite you — GIGO being the programming acronym for Garbage In, Garbage Out. Shooting 22 LR rimfire rifles accurately presents an unavoidable problem for small-game hunters: You can’t load your own ammo.

Happy with a short, punchy .308

Orthodoxy in Training

I introduce a new person to firearms every week or two. Usually, we cover the basics of rimfire pistol and rifle. I teach the stances and positions learned in courses I took. Every so often, the learners stump me by adopting positions that are unorthodox and seemingly inefficient. For example, this right eye dominant shooter used a variation on the conventional sitting and kneeling positions that I have not seen before. It didn’t look stable, but she made 75 yard hits on sporting clays with it, so it worked well enough.

1908 Steyr-Pieper .32 tip-barrel pistol

“Amazing penetration and striking power!”

This marketing slogan of the early 1900s described pistols chambered in the lowly .32 ACP cartridge. The guns were touted as being good for everything from home defense to assassinating important persons to self-defense against brown bear. To the modern reader, such claims appear outrageous, but why were they taken seriously back then? The rounds that 32ACP superseded were mainly the black powder .320 revolver cartridges loaded with lead round nose bullets. 80 grain unjacketed bullet at about 550fps lacked penetration and typically did not expand. Five or six of those from a revolver were rather less likely to end a fight than eight jacketed pistol bullets propelled by smokeless powder at 900fps. Neither round would equal the performance of .38 Automatic or similar, but then neither would the larger guns fit pockets, whereas the .32 could. Note that neither the higher velocity nor the greater penetration were at all significant for target shooting, so the Olympic pistols use .32 S&W Long even today.