Posts Tagged ‘Kel-Tec’

Gray-haired man in blue jacket with red ear protection shoots a pistol carbine into the woods.

Pistol-Caliber Carbines for Home Defense

I am always interested in different opinions about home-defense firearms. The three-gun trifecta—handgun, shotgun and rifle—is often commented on, with recommendations given. Many times the recommended rifle is more useful for an Israeli police action than home defense. Comments range from “the .223 has a lot of blast indoors” to “the system is very expensive, but you must have one” all the way to “buck it up, lay down the credit card and get with the program.”

Kel_Tec_M43_01

SHOT 2014 — Kel-Tec’s New Bullpups the M43 and RDB

Earlier in January someone leaked a product sheet for two new Kel-Tec bullpup rifles named the RDB and M43. I heard Kel-Tec was pretty ticked off about the leak, but the flier circulated the gun blogs quickly. I wondered if maybe Kel-Tec was mad because the rifles didn’t exist, but sure enough, Kel-Tec unveiled prototypes of the M43 and RDB at SHOT Show 2014.

Kel-Tec PMR 30

Lovin’ the PMR-30

The call came late on a Saturday afternoon. I’d asked an FFL friend to be on the lookout for a Kel-Tec PMR-30 at a reasonable price, and after three months of no-news-is-bad-news, this was it: “I’ve found two PMRs at a local shop,” he said. “If you can call them with a credit card in the next five minutes, you can have one for $600.”

PMR30 and FN5-7 side by side

PMR-30 vs FN5-7

The argument about the relative merits of these two pistols has gone on for years. Let’s take a look at the technical parameters and then compare the intangibles. The guns are roughly similar in size, with PMR30 just a little shorter and slimmer. Both have manual thumb safety. FN5-7 magazines are easier to load. PMR30 has less felt recoil and crisper trigger.

The beefed up SU16 still weighs just a shade over five pounds.

Incremental Improvements of SU16.

Most popular rifles have evolved throughout their service life. Lee-Metford action of 1888 lasted into the 1950s, changing in that time its stock shape, its sights, the method of loading, the safety, the trigger mechanism and even the type of rifling. AK47 evolved from a 7.62mm milled rifle into a 5.45mm stamped AK12 with hundred of minor changes and improvements.

Picture shows a Kel-Tec KSG shotgun.

Quick & Dirty Video: The Kel-Tec KSG 12-Gauge Pump in Action

The Kel-Tec KSG pump shotgun is a 12-gauge bullpup that’s as short as most submachine guns. The Cylinder bore barrel is 18.5 inches long, but the KSG is still shorter in OAL than the typical police shotgun with a 14-inch barrel. The gun will feed and chamber 3-inch ammunition, but 2.75-inch shotshells provide higher capacity and lower recoil. The accompanying video shows what it looks like in action:

10-shot super-shortie with 10" barrel

Shortie and Shorter Yet

Not everyone feels the need for fifteen shot capacity of the KSG. Some people however want shorter length for the tight confines of police cruisers and other vehicles. Enter the super-shorties from Keltec.

Kel-Tec PMR-30

Kel-Tec to Expand Production

Kel-Tec isn’t famous for over producing their guns. To meet the demands of Kel-Tec’s latest, most-desired guns, they switched their focus from design, to production. At the 2012 SHOT Show, Kelt-Tec showed off some improvements to the controversial KSG, as well as the famous RFB.

Customized Sub2000

Improving the Sub2000

The Kel-Tec Sub2000 carbine is a very unusual weapon. Conceived during the ban years, it folds in half in the middle of the receiver and can be safely carried loaded. This design wasn’t prohibited by law simply because our evil law-makers didn’t think of banning something this innovative.

Switch to the second magazine without taking eyes off the target

The Controversial KSG

Having had the KSG for a year now, I’d like to provide a review to those who are considering it for themselves. Like most Kel-Tec designs, this 12-guage bullpup is unorthodox. It improves on conventional pump shotguns in a number of ways. Let’s look at the features first, then the actual performance.