Posts Tagged ‘Handgun Ammunition’

Several expended handgun bullets

Balancing Power and Recoil for Self-Defense

 

After training hundreds of individuals and doing considerable research on handguns and cartridges, I have come to realize that many shooters do not realize the work a handgun cartridge must do. There has been considerable research and intensive testing during the past two decades—more so than the previous 100 years. The FBI set the need for penetration, expansion, and diameter forth after expensive and extensive testing, but how many shooters truly understand caliber, ballistics, and bullet choice?

Two regular round and 2 expanded bullets

Range Report: OATH Ammunition

When choosing ammunition for personal defense there are many considerations. The balance of expansion and penetration must be maintained. Penetration must never be compromised. It remains the single most important terminal consideration.

cardboard box with bullets spilling out

Top 10 Ammo Posts

Whether you shoot rifles, shotguns, or handguns the most, the biggest lifetime expense — even considering the initial purchase cost of the firearm — is almost always ammo.

Smith and Wesson revolver with chamber open and wood grain grip, pointed downward on pale yellow background with partial wording showing.

Magnumitis: The .357 Magnum Cartridge

A Rifle on the Hip

You won’t find Magnumitis in the dictionary. The term, coined as a derisive nickname for the tendency of shooters to go for broke in the pursuit of power, simply implies a shooter who has succumbed to Magnumitis places power above accuracy.

Rock Island 1911-A1 FS Tactical in 10mm

On the Tenth Day of Christmas, My True Love Gave Me a Lady Dressed in Black

Alright Santa, I know what I want. I have been above average this year and this is it. I got to shoot the Rock Island 1911-A1 FS Tactical in 10mm last week and it was awesome. My manager and I spent a couple of days drooling about the ballistics of the 10mm cartridge. I love to do the math by hand and he checked current offerings for this monster 10mm Auto cartridge. This was going to be a fun day at the range. A new gun in a great big caliber.

Colt Delta Elite - One attempt to harness the 10mm

Cartridge of the Week, the 10mm, 10mm Auto

Those who have followed my posts know I have one foot in the past and one barely in the present when it comes to firearms and cartridges. It takes a lot of evidence and time to prove something to me. Nothing like the tried, true and tested. Nevertheless, I cannot argue with the point that somethings are good right out of the box, like the Colt Python, wait there I go again. Another thing that is hard to argue with is physics. Well you can, but people will see you talking to yourself and runaway. When it comes to physics and raw proof, there are few cartridges that rival the mighty 10mm Auto.

38 Special the loyal Friend of Police Officers

Cartridge of the Week, the Smith and Wesson .38 Special, .38 SPL, .38 SPC

It does not have to be flashy just dependable. It’s always there and it always works. It is like a good friend in a pinch you can count on it to be there for you. I am a traditionalist. I prefer something proven over the test of time – not the media or Internet hype. I am not a person who follows fads. That is why the next cartridge is so “Special” to me. That good friend throughout the years is the Smith and Wesson .38 Special.

Steel-cased Ammo

At Gun Nuts Media, I have a post talking about Hornady Steel Match ammunition.  This ammo is available from Cheaper Than Dirt in 9mm,  .40 S&W, .45 ACP, .223 Remington, and .308 Winchester.  Now, the debate about steel-cased ammo has raged on the Internet for as long as I can remember, with opinions that vary from “never use steel ammo” to “I use it all the time” and everything in between.  I’ve known shooters who would use steel-cased ammo in certain guns but not others; I know people who say “never use it in Glocks”, and so on.  The issue is that if you shoot a lot, it’s kind of hard to argue with less than $9.00 a box for 9mm ammo from our friends in Russia.

Tula 115 grain 9mm ammo: $8.69 for a box of 50

So what do you say?  Do you run steel-cased ammo through your guns, pistols and rifles?  Or would you not touch the stuff with a 10-foot pole?  Add in to that the fact that many indoor ranges prohibit the use of steel-cased ammunition as it messes with their recycling contracts for brass, and the equation becomes even more complicated.  I think one of the big issues that I have with the “anti” steel-cased crowd is that to my knowledge no one has ever done a truly high round count with steel-cased stuff to see if it actually increases wear and tear on guns.  I’d like to see someone take a Glock 17 or other modern production firearm, and run 20,000 rounds of steel-cased ammo through it, and compare the wear and tear to a gun that’s had 20,000 rounds of brass-cased ammo.  Would it be different?  Hard to know unless we do the shooting.

For me, I’ll keep using steel-cased ammo.  Sure, I can only use it at outdoor ranges, but that’s fine with me.  Sound off in comments—are you for or against using ammo in a steel case?