Posts Tagged ‘Glock Firearms’

Glock 19

Why I Chose a Glock 19 for Concealed Carry

I like all sorts of pistols, but I choose to carry the Glock 19. I believe the road to firearms knowledge is paved with money, embarrassment in classes and competitions, and rounds sent downrange. I’ve been fortunate to walk that path in the past 15 years or so, and I’ve tried out dozens of different carry guns in that time. Here is how I learned that for me, the Glock tops them all.

Adams Arms Glock Conversion Kit—Practice Makes Perfect

OK, I admit it.  I don’t do dry fire practice nearly enough.  To me, training with my defensive firearms means live fire at the range, which means range fees and ammo costs and cleaning the guns afterwards, and that means I don’t train as much as I should.  And supplementing my training with dry fire practice is boring and tedious and in my opinion has a serious flaw—without a projectile going downrange and impacting a target, I don’t get feedback on whether I’m screwing it up.  Momma always told me “practice makes perfect,” but the truth is “practice makes permanent.”  I need a hole in the target to show me that I’m practicing correctly.

Enter the Advantage Arms LE .22lr Conversion Kit for Glock.  The mid-sized, 9mm Glock 19 is my daily carry piece and therefore the gun that I need the most training with.  Pistol marksmanship and manipulation are perishable skills. I want to train specifically with the trigger, controls, and grip of my Glock 19.  If I substitute my Glock practice with a Ruger MkIII target gun, the trigger is different, the sights are different, the grip angle is different, the magazine doesn’t drop free… you get the idea.  Pretty soon I’m just plinking, not training, right?  The Advantage Arms kit is a replacement .22lr slide assembly that drops right onto my Glock 19’s frame with no modifications.  At a casual glance the slide looks just like the factory 9mm slide, with identical cocking serrations milled into it and factory Glock adjustable sights.  It attaches and detaches just like the factory slide, which means I have to dry fire a .22 to take it off.  That’s normally a big no-no, but the barrel is relieved where the firing pin would normally impact it and get mangled.  The included 10-round plastic magazine drops free like the 9mm mags do and locks the slide back after the last shot like the 9mm mags do.  Shooting the .22 kit uses the exact same manual of arms and sight picture as a factory Glock 19, but firing ammo that costs one-fourth as much as the cheapest 9mm I can find.  Put another way, I can shoot four times as often per dollar spent on ammo.   Or, if I paid $250 for the conversion kit, it will pay for itself in shot-for-shot ammo savings after about 7000 rounds of ammo fired (around thirteen of those 525 round value packs I like to buy).

Shooting the .22 kit is a real hoot.  I was able to get a 2.5 inch group at 10 yards away with supported, slow fire, but the five-pound trigger in my Glock isn’t a target trigger, the sights aren’t target sights, and I was shooting cheap value pack ammo, not match grade stuff.  Honestly, that’s about as straight as I can shoot the gun in 9mm configuration anyway.  I told you I need more practice!  The kit only comes with one magazine, I’ll acquire more since they are only about $15.  A plastic, Glock-style magazine loader is included with the kit, and I’m glad.  Even though the mag only holds ten rounds it has a lot of spring pressure and the last couple of rounds are tiresome to mash into place with my thumbs.  A basic cleaning kit and some oil are also included.  I had some failures to extract spent casings during my first range trip, but they didn’t really bother me. Most .22lr conversion kits are known to go through a problematic break-in period before they “settle down” and become more reliable.  Additionally, the cheap ammo I was using is not on the list of recommended ammo types which is printed off and included in the box with the kit.  Next time I’ll buy some better ammo.

I’m planning on using the conversion to practice realistic drills such as drawing from my concealed carry holster and firing a controlled pair into a target seven yards away.  Why not just dry fire the drill?  When I draw from concealment I’m using gross motor skills (big muscles moving as fast as they can) to get the gun out of the holster and pointed in the right direction, followed up by fine motor skills (little muscles that have to move with precision) to acquire my sight picture, squeeze the trigger, recover from the recoil, find the trigger’s reset point, and squeeze again.  The natural mistake to make in this drill is to mash the trigger hard and skimp on the front sight alignment because I’m in a hurry and didn’t successfully switch from big fast movements to precise movements.  If I’m dry firing, I won’t even realize I’m doing it, but if I’m training with the .22 kit, I’ll know immediately that I screwed up as soon as I see the holes in the target.  And with dry fire I have to cycle the slide myself if I want to feel the trigger’s reset, which means taking my support hand off the grip and… well, its just not the same.  The only place where the conversion kit allows me to really “cheat” in shooting drills is with rate of fire, because the felt recoil impulse is much smaller with .22lr (in fact there is pretty much no recoil).  So I can really blaze away with the conversion kit, putting aimed rounds down range much faster than I realistically could with the same gun in 9mm.  Sure its fun, but again that’s plinking, not training.  I’ll have to keep that in mind.

I’m excited about picking up the Advantage Arms Conversion Kit and my plans to increase my live-fire training time with it.  Of course I will still be putting a lot of 9mm holes in targets as well, but I believe that my shooting fundamentals with the Glock 19 will improve by the extra practice I can afford now.  Hopefully my practice will make perfect, instead of just permanent.

 Glock_22_10 Glock_22_9

Down Zero TV: Rock Out with your Glock Out

Today’s episode of Down Zero TV has me back at Paul Bunyan Shooting Range in Puyallup, Washington shooting their monthly USPSA Match. You may notice that for the first time in 3 months, I’m not running a 1911. No, for this match I shot a factory stock Glock 34 in Limited-10. That means I took the scoring hit for minor power factor; so instead of 4 points for a “Charlie” hit I only scored 3. Here’s the match footage, which contains a mix of chase and POV cameras!

So how’d it come out? Another local match win – 1st Place L-10 division, even with being scored minor. I won 4 stages overall, finished 2nd on a 5th stage, and then 4th and 6th respective on the other two stages. I was actually REALLY surprised by the 4th place stage, since I felt I shot it very well. In the video, it’s the stage where I engage the steel strong hand only through the port. I was overconfident going into that port and not reloading, but I felt like I could go 1 for 1 on the steel shooting strong hand. I was wrong and I paid the price in time.

Here’s the gear breakdown for this episode:

This weekend, I’ll be in Florida for the Pro-Am match running a new gun that I’ll reveal tomorrow on Gun Nuts. I’m really looking forward to shooting this match, Phil Strader has been trying to convince me to go since the 2009 Bianchi Cup. This is a “bucket list” match for me, and I’m looking to visit the prize table for this match!

If you like this post, please…

Lone Wolf G9 Joins the Pack

Many of us among the shooting community love to shoot AR-style rifles. Some of us build them from the ground up; painstakingly honing each and every component into a thing of precision and beauty. However, when it comes to taking it to the range we face the endless, and sometimes problematic, issue of ammunition cost. It is the same problem drivers face when they go to fill up at the pump. If you want to drive your car, you have to fill it with gas. If you want to fire your weapon, you best be ready to fork over some greenbacks. With the rising cost of ammunition, this has become a problem for many would-be shooters. A common solution, for the person who enjoys the look and feel of an AR-15, are AR-15 .22 conversion kits or AR rifles chambered for the .22, built from scratch. However, what if you want a firearm that offers a more lifelike experience to that of a standard .223 AR-15? Lone Wolf distributors have the answer in their new G9 Carbine.

The G9 Carbine is a 9mm AR-15-style rifle chambered to fit your standard Glock magazines. What are the advantages to shooting 9mm ammunition out of an AR-15 type rifle? Indoor range use comes to mind. There is nothing worse than going to the big outdoor range and experiencing the misfortune of getting rained out. Some of us just shoot better in an indoor environment. If you already own a Glock 9mm, you are in luck. Your magazines will fit perfectly into the lower receiver of the G9. If you bring your Glock and your G9 to the range, you only have to lug along one type of ammo.

This carbine is compatible with many AR-15 parts. If you already own a tricked-out AR-15, customizing this weapon to fit your lifestyle is seamless. The rifle we tested featured a free-float, picatinny-style quad-rail system for mounting whatever accessories you can think of. The Lone Wolf 9mm compensator reduced recoil, but not as much as we would have liked. We used a Burris Fast Fire II red dot sight to aim the rounds downrange and the gun proved to be accurate with a variety of high quality and value brand ammunition. We also experienced no jamming issues while firing at the steel-plate targets. We tested the crisp trigger pull at four and half pounds. When the magazine is empty, the bolt will only hold open if the bolt catch is manually engaged. The spring seemed a little light for the 9mm round. A heavier buffer would have assisted in reducing recoil, but it wasn’t unmanageable.

Designed for the shooter who does not want to take out a second mortgage to buy ammunition, the Lone Wolf G9 Carbine is an excellent choice. Glock owners will be pleased that they do not have to buy a stack of new magazines, and the act of shooting the wider 9mm round gives you a near exact experience to shooting a .223 AR-15.

Specifications and Features:

Lower:

  • 2.4 lbs
  • 15 5/8″ collapsed
  • 17 7/8″ extended
  • 6 5/8″ high
  • 1 9/16″ wide

Upper:

  • 4.2 lbs
  • 24 1/4″ long
  • 2 1/2″ high and wide

Lone Wolf Timberwolf

We’ve got an exclusive first look at Lone Wolf Distributors’ brand new .40 caliber race gun. This custom race gun was developed in part by Team Cheaper Than Dirt! shooter Patrick Kelley, and incorporates Lone Wolf’s Timberwolf frame and their hybrid ported Werewolf slide.

USPSA legal











Silver barreled, black handled Walther PPK with a focus on the safety mechanism, against a white background

Handgun Safeties

Since the invention of the first commercially usable autoloading handgun, the P08 Luger designed by Georg Luger, handgun safeties have been a common part of handgun design. The purpose of a safety mechanism on pistols is to prevent the handgun from firing when you don’t want it to.

Black Beretta 92FS, barrel pointed to the left, on a white background

Old Reliable: The Beretta 92

The Beretta 92 series has gone through a lot of changes in its service life with the U.S. military.  First introduced in the ’80s, it met with tremendous resistance from die hard aficionados of the 1911 it was replacing. The Beretta M9 was the pistol I qualified with, and it was also my very first carry gun when I got my Indiana LTC.