Posts Tagged ‘Diamondback DB9’

Boxed 9 mm Ammunition

The Diamondback DB9 — The Ultimate Concealed Carry Solution

A few years ago, Diamondback Firearms entered the compact carry market with the successful introduction of the DB380. It followed that up with one of—if not the—smallest 9 mms to hit the market. In fact, about the only difference between the two is the slightly increased size of the DB9 required to accommodate the larger 9 mm cartridge.

Guns That Fit in a Stocking

Kahr Arms CM9

Kahr Arms CM9

Kahr Arms CM9

Kahr holds six patents protecting the unique design features of their pistols. The CM9 is a striker fired sub-compact with a six round magazine. Because of its asymmetric feed ramp design (that’s one patent right there) the CM9 is only .9 inches wide, yes that’s less than an inch. Despite a short overall length of only 5.42 inches, the barrel is still 3 inches long, providing good accuracy. The trigger has a very smooth, light double action feel. The CNC machined 416 stainless steel slide houses the drift-adjustable, white bar-dot combat sights, which the eye easily picks up for rapid target acquisition. The CM9’s frame is made of polymer for lightness, but it still strong enough that the Kahr polymer framed guns enjoy a great reputation for durability. The CM9 stands out as a beautifully crafted, trustworthy, and tiny 9mm that is easily hidden, yet easy to shoot. Kahr’s excellent reliability record gives peace of mind to owners who need a concealable gun they can trust when people’s lives are on the line.

 

 

 

Smith and Wesson M&P9c

S&W M&P9c

S&W M&P9c

The Smith and Wesson M&P series is quickly taking the pistol world by storm. Many serious competitors in IDPA and USPSA competition are using the full sized versions of these guns. Police officers all over the country are learning that they can depend on the M&P to be a trustworthy sidearm. Smith and Wesson also manufactures this compact version for concealed carry. It is only 4.3 inches tall and 1.2 inches wide, but it still holds 10 rounds of 9mm ammo. Accuracy from the 3.5-inch barrel is surprisingly good if you can master the 6.5-pound trigger pull. This model has a magazine safety, so it won’t fire with the magazine removed. There is no active safety, but it features multiple passive safety systems such as a firing pin block and trigger safety. The Novak sights are snag free yet easy to use, the slide-stop is ambidextrous, and the magazine catch is reversible for lefties. S&W coated the barrel and stainless steel slide in Melonite for hardness and corrosion resistance. Three interchangeable grips provide a choice so shooters can configure the M&Pc to fit hands of all sizes.

 

 

Glock 26

Glock 26

Glock 26

The Glock 26 is nicknamed “The Baby Glock” for its small dimensions (only 6.3 inches long) and light weight (19.8 ounces unloaded). Despite its shrunken size, it still holds 10 rounds of 9mm ammo in its flush fitting, double-stack magazine. Many shooters find the Baby Glock to be so small that they purchase aftermarket extended floorplates to give their pinky finger a grip on the gun, it’s that small! The cold hammer forged barrel features polygonal rifling for excellent accuracy out of a tiny gun. Of course, the Glock 26 features the “Safe-Action” striker fired system that everyone else is now copying, and the amazing rust resistant Tennifer coating that has been mimicked many times, but never equaled. The “Baby Glock” is just as durable and reliable as its bigger brothers that have been the standard sidearm for police forces all over the world for decades.

 

 

 

 

Kel-Tec P11

Kel-Tec P11

Kel-Tec P11

Want a lot of 9mm firepower but in the smallest, lightest, and most affordable package possible? The Kel-Tec P11 may be for you. Holding ten rounds of 9mm ammo in a package just 5.6 inches long, 4.3 inches tall, and 1 inch wide, the P11 only weighs 14 ounces unloaded. When Kel-Tec released the P11, it stood alone as the smallest and lightest 9mm ever made. There is no “active” safety on the P11. Therefore, the double-action-only trigger weighs in at a relatively hefty 9 pounds of pull, so there is no chance of pulling it on accident. The barrel and slide are made of 4140 Ordnance Steel, and the frame is machined 7075-T6 aluminum, which is the same material as AR-15 receivers. Kel-Tec covered the frame with a high impact polymer shell to protect it and keep it as light as possible. The P11 is super concealable and super affordable, but it’s not for the recoil sensitive—the recoil when you rapid fire ten rounds through this little gun is also “super” as well!

 

 

 

Diamondback DB9

 

Diamondback DB9

Diamondback DB9

The Diamondback Firearms DB9 currently holds the record for smallest, lightest 9mm pistol on the market. Weighing only 11 ounces unloaded, only .80 inches in width, and only 4 inches tall with the magazine, it’s even smaller than the Kel-Tec P11. The patent-pending “ZERO-energy” striker system results in a light and smooth 5 pound trigger pull. The DB9 doesn’t have a slide stop, and Diamondback doesn’t recommend using bullets heavier than 124 grains. The manufacturer also states that shooting high pressure +P ammunition is also a bad idea. Considering its size and lack of weight, these are small compromises for the shooter who wants a 9mm hideaway gun that is smaller than many .380s. The DB9 features real windage-adjustable sights, a high quality metal magazine and magazine catch, and a proprietary corrosion-resistant coating on the slide, barrel, and all internal parts. Hang on tight though; shooting 9mm ammo through an 11 ounce DB-9 is a heck of a ride!

Tiny Gun, Huge Punch

Many people have differing ideas about what a backup gun is. Is it a good idea to sacrifice magazine capacity for size? What caliber is best? What about reliability or accuracy? Some of you might be familiar with small pocket-sized pistols such as the Ruger LC9 or the Kahr PM9. These small, concealable firearms allow shooters to carry a bit of extra firepower out of sight. The new Diamondback firearm is something to consider. What if you had a firearm smaller than most .380 pistols that can carry a six-round magazine of 9mm stopping power, ready to fly at a moments notice? Enter the Diamondback DB9.

 

The first and most obvious advantage to this firearm is the ballistic superiority of the 9mm cartridge. Some experts say that the .380 round, in general, will expand or penetrate, not both. 9mm ammunition tends not to have this problem. There is a reason why many law enforcement and military personnel use the 9mm. It is light enough to carry a lot of ammunition, and heavy enough to put a bad guy down, which, for a belly gun, seems ideal to me. The next major feature this firearm brings to the table is its incredibly small size. At only .8 inches wide, it is just a tiny bit wider than the handle on my coffee cup. It fits on the inside of my belt line much more comfortably than any other 9mm’s I have tried. This could be, however, due to the lack of a slide catch on the side of the weapon. The grip is still easy to handle despite its ultra thin physique. The extended bottom plate makes holding this firearm much more comfortable. The ridges on the sides of the grip help to hold the gun firmly in your hand. Striations along the slide aid in chambering a round. When empty, the gun weighs in at only 11 ounces and has a very balanced feel. A steel trigger with dual-connecting bars allows for a crisp smooth, five-pound double-action-0nly (DAO) trigger pull. I noticed almost no creaking when cycling the weapon. Accuracy seemed to be spot on, the rounds shot to point of aim with no problem. The three-dot sight system on top of the gun is adjustable for windage, but did not need adjusting out of the box.

In firing the weapon, recoil was fairly pronounced but in a straight line, as opposed to whipping to one side or the other when cycling. We experienced no jamming or feeding problems when firing rounds through the gun.

Overall, the Diamondback DB9 is an excellent choice for a backup or belly gun. I like the idea of carrying something with a bit more bite than your average .380 pocket gun. A lot of firepower in a tiny, travel-sized package is to me, just plain genius.

Specifications and Features:

  • Capacity: 6+1 Rounds
  • Weight: 11 Ounces
  • Length: 5.60″
  • Height: 4.00″ with mag
  • Width: 0.80″
  • Barrel Length: 3.00″
  • Firing Mechanism: Striker Fire