Posts Tagged ‘Antique Firearms’

"One of One Thousand" Winchester Model 1873 Rifle from the Ray Bentley Collection

Julia’s Spring 2018 Extraordinary Firearms Auction

This will be the final auction held at Julia’s fabled Fairfield, Maine auction barn before all future auctions move to Morphy Auctions Locations in Denver, Pennsylvania, and Las Vegas. Here is the entire release, for those who are serious investors and the rest of of us who will simply drool and dream…

Cimarron Open Top revolver left side

Cimarron’s Open Top Revolver

The history of men and women and machines is fascinating. The revolver may not be the most in demand at Cheaper than Dirt! but there are none more interesting. The first cartridge revolver in the United States was the little Smith and Wesson Number 1 in .22 Short. Colt was making thousands of cap-and-ball revolvers for the Union Army and Smith and Wesson sold its revolvers through private sale. Soldiers could tuck the little .22 into their shirts or jackets. Colts were the horse pistols, and the revolvers used by fast moving cavalry units.

Model 1874 Gatling Gun

5 Guns for Cheaper Than Dirt

Rock Island Auction Company’s December 2013 Premiere Firearms Auction is showing some pretty impressive wares for all types of collectors. The first day of the auction has over 770 lots where the low estimate is $2,000 or less. This of course is in addition to its regular selection of amazing, one-of-a-kind collector and investment grade firearms. Below are a few highlights of both the phenomenal and the affordable.

Hungarian 7.62x54 Mosin Nagant rifle with original boxed cartridges.

Shooting the Russian 7.62×54

Over the years we have seen a steady progression in rifle performance, and the modernization of rifle powder. Black powder rusted the metal almost as soon as it was fired. Modern rifle powder, such as Varget, is very clean. Corrosive primed ammunition isn’t something to be avoided, and the powder burn is often clean. You simply have to follow a few steps to fire and use this affordable ammunition.

Right side of the Mosin Nagant with a wood slat fence in the background

The Mosin Nagant — A Must Own Rifle

My first center fire rifle was a Mosin Nagant. I think quite a few of you may be able to say the same. The rifle cost $65, and it was a poor example of the type having suffered the indignity of having the original military stock cut short and an odd-looking pistol grip nailed to the stock. However, in 1970 money, the Nagant cost more than a nice example costs today.

Rare U.S. Springfield Armory Model 1875 Officer's Model Trapdoor Rifle, Late Type II

The History of the Springfield Trapdoor

In terms of American military long arms, very little attention is given to a predecessor of the much-heralded M1903 and M1 Garand, the Springfield Trapdoor. Produced for over 20 years, the Springfield Trapdoor experienced many changes throughout its life. The rifle would take its place in history just after the Civil War—despite the justifiable hesitation of many military personnel who were all too aware of the superiority of repeaters and magazine fed rifles.

Blue Book of Gun Values

Blue Booking an Old Relic

You know that rifle that’s been sitting in the corner of your closet for decades? Every wonder exactly how much that thing is worth? With the gun market being what it is right now, it may be time to dust off some of those old firearms and see how they perform with a sale tag tied on. The Blue Book of Gun Values is a tool virtually everyone in the industry uses for pricing just about every type of firearm. If you are buying or selling even one gun—you absolutely need this reference.

M&P40 .40 S&W

Manufacturer of the Week, Smith and Wesson, Smith & Wesson, S&W

Founded in 1852 by Horace Smith and Daniel Wesson the original Smith & Wesson Company, then based in Norwich, Connecticut, has few rivals as an American company not just a firearms manufacturer. It would take complete failure and the help of two unlikely sources – neither being the U.S. government – before it would become the company that is a household name around the world.

Classic M1A Carbine with wood forend and metal folding stock

Firearm of the Week, the US Caliber .30 M1 /M1A1/M1A3/ M2/M2A2/M3 Carbine

You all know the big man on campus the M1 Garand, well this week we are going to play with the little kid on the block. The younger brother who gets left out of all the fun. However, be careful little brother can fight too. As we know, looks can be deceiving-as is the case of this little giant. Easy to shoot, carry and reload our next rifle is a bulldog, not a lot of bark, but a lot of bite.

Spencer Carbine Cross Section

The Top AR Platforms of the 1870s

Your position is under attack. You need to fire copious amounts of bullets. You need to overwhelm the opposing force. Firepower is the essence and it must come from a small group of soldiers. At the very least, you need to double your enemy’s rate of fire. You need a short fast rifle that is quick into action. You need a carbine platform that is easy to carry. You need an assault rifle.

Wild Bill Hickok, His .36 Colt Navy with a Dead Mans Hand

Firearm of the Week, the Colt Model of 1851 .36 Caliber Navy, Revolving Belt Pistol of Naval Caliber

We are going old school this week—really old school. This was the Colt that made all men equal in the final days of black powder percussion firearms. One of the most produced and popular pistols of any era, the gun was the Colt Model of 1851 .36 caliber Navy. If you have not wrapped your hand around one of these smoke wagons and made big medicine then you should make an addition to your bucket list.