Posts Tagged ‘.308’

Multicam in Afghanistan

U.S. Army Cancels Interim Combat Service Rifle (ICSR) Program

Last week, The Shooter’s Log ran a throwback article on the Top 5 Combat Rifles of All Time. The debate was lively to say the least, but the one overarching theme was a feeling that the 5.56 simply did not have enough punch. The U.S. Army seems to agree. So, last August, the Army announced the Interim Combat Service Rifle (ICSR) program. The ICSR was tasked with replacing the Army’s M4 carbine with a 7.62 mm rifle. A month later, the program was cancelled.

Brass rifle cartridge cases

Reloading 101: The Cartridge Case

Bear with me! We’ll get started on the process of handloading next time when I talk about setting up a sizing die. But before that, it’s good to keep in mind what we’re dealing with, and that is a cartridge case, and also what happens to it during firing, which is what we’re setting out to remedy when we reuse it.

Hungarian 7.62x54 Mosin Nagant rifle with original boxed cartridges.

Shooting the Russian 7.62×54

Over the years we have seen a steady progression in rifle performance, and the modernization of rifle powder. Black powder rusted the metal almost as soon as it was fired. Modern rifle powder, such as Varget, is very clean. Corrosive primed ammunition isn’t something to be avoided, and the powder burn is often clean. You simply have to follow a few steps to fire and use this affordable ammunition.

Mk.14 EBR (Enhanced Battle Rifle)

Firearm of the Week, the United States Rifle, 7.62 mm, M14, M21/M25 SWS, M1A, Mk 14 EBR

“It is better to burn out then to fade away.” Thus it was for one of the shortest-lived standard-issued battle rifles for the U. S. military. A firearm sandwiched in between the great M1 Garand and the M16, historically speaking this gun barely made a showing on the battlefield. However, in its brief appearance it made such an impression that it is once again being called in the line of duty. That rifle is the United States 7.62mm M14.

7.62x51 Ready For Launch

Cartridge of the Week: The .308 Winchester, 7.62×51 NATO, 7.62x51mm

If you hear the shot, it was not meant for you. If you run, you will only die tired. Reach out and touch someone. Ah sniper talk, guys from the high ground, I love it. Without this cartridge, the sniper story would be greatly diminished. From 1952, its design year, then 1954, when the U.S. military chose it as the rifle cartridge for their forces and up to the present it has been the cornerstone cartridge for the long-range warrior. That cartridge is the 7.62x51mm NATO or the civilian .308 Winchester.

Mag H&K G3 7.62x51mm Aluminum 20 Round MAG-304

Customer Reviews: $2 H&K G3 Mags Are a Hit

Members of our community aren’t shy about saying what they like — and don’t like — in the “Customer Review” areas of Cheaper Than Dirt’s web pages. Reviews from actual purchasers contain hands-on, specific advice about the pros and cons of products our customers spent hard-earned money on. Case in point: 345 members of the Cheaper Than Dirt community who have purchased certain H&K G3 magazines rate them 4.5 on Cheaper Than Dirt’s 5-bullet scale.

5.56x45 NATO

Is 5.56 the Best Option for Everyone?

Many people love the AR-15. If you are not one of them, then a large number of gun enthusiasts might tell you to go pound sand. The platform is versatile, deadly, readily available, and somewhat affordable. When shoppers first start looking at battle rifles, they tend to start at the bottom and eventually work their way up. Would be owners quickly realize that like most things in life, you get what you pay for. Entry-level ARs are often .223/5.56 semi-auto rifles with few to no options, and sometimes-shoddy construction. Guns that are more expensive offer rails with endless accessories, as well as different calibers. Just when you thought you knew everything there is to know about the AR-15, they change it up. So is a high end AR chambered in a wildcat or alternative caliber a good idea?