Lawmakers Regulate Firearm Accessory Manufacturer Out of Business

By Dave Dolbee published on in Gun Gear, Legal

It is a shame when any firearm or accessory manufacturer has to close its doors. Colt went through its problems and Remington from its losses. We can armchair quarterback what each company did right or wrong, but in the end, it was the decisions of each company’s leadership that was ultimately responsible. Today’s tale is different. Slide Fire is set to announce that it will permanently cease all operations and sales on May 25. Was this due to poor decisions by its leaders? I would certainly say. More likely, Slide Fire’s demise is being caused by politicians in response to the actions of one person, the Las Vegas Massacre shooter.

Slide Fire Logo

During the October 2017 mass shooting in Las Vegas, the shooter was reported to have used a bump fire-style stock on one or more of the firearms used. Although hundreds of thousands of bump fire systems have been sold, and only one recorded criminal act was purportedly committed using the system, politicians across the nation—including President Trump—have sought to outlaw the equipment.

The Blame Game

In discussions with my non-gun owning friends, I have often pointed out the error of blaming the equipment and not the evil actions of the person committing the act. I can make dozens of comparisons, for example, we do not blame the car when a person drives drunk; we blame the driver. However, when discussing bump fire stocks with fellow gun owners, I occasionally hear arguments such as how bump fire systems are a waste of expensive ammunition or that they do not care because they do not own a bump fire system, so they are not concerned with the regulation. This is a misguided attitude. What happens when politicians come for a gun or accessory you do care about?

Florida recently passed a law banning any accessory that increases the firearms rate of fire. Does that mean any trigger job or short reset trigger is now illegal? Some Florida politicians have admitted the legislation was rushed and needs to be fixed, but once enacted, gun regulations are seldom altered. Do you really believe the Florida politicians will proceed with the same haste to make the corrections as they did to enact the infringing law?

Anti-Knife March

After years of firearms bans in Britain, crimes and killings with knives have reached epidemic levels in Great Britain.

Conclusion

If one piece of equipment can be outlawed due to a single heinous act, or even the actions of a few bad actors, where will it end? Will the United States follow Britain? Will we regulate firearms to the point of effectively banning all firearm ownership? After several years of firearm regulations, edged weapon attacks in Britain have risen to alarming rates. In fact, Britain is now considering regulation on edged weapons. Will this be our future?

I am all for the free market. The success or failure of a business should be left to the consumer and the business’ ability to compete within its sector. In Slide Fire’s case, however, it is not a free market that is causing its downfall. Instead, it is politicians making poor decisions by blaming a piece of equipment and not the person committing the unlawful act. This should be a lesson to us all and cause every gun owner to take a step back and reexamine the threat this poses to the Second Amendment.

Outlawing bump fire stocks will not quench the thirst of feel good politics or the efforts of those bent on repealing the Second Amendment; it will only embolden them for the next attack on our rights. Do you agree? Share your answer in the comment section

SLRule

Growing up in Pennsylvania’s game-rich Allegany region, Dave Dolbee was introduced to whitetail hunting at a young age. At age 19 he bought his first bow while serving in the U.S. Navy, and began bowhunting after returning from Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm. Dave was a sponsored Pro Staff Shooter for several top archery companies during the 1990s and an Olympic hopeful holding up to 16 archery records at one point. During Dave’s writing career, he has written for several smaller publications as well as many major content providers such as Guns & Ammo, Shooting Times, Outdoor Life, Petersen’s Hunting, Rifle Shooter, Petersen’s Bowhunting, Bowhunter, Game & Fish magazines, Handguns, F.O.P Fraternal Order of Police, Archery Business, SHOT Business, OutdoorRoadmap.com, TheGearExpert.com and others. Dave is currently a staff writer for Cheaper Than Dirt!

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Comments (50)

  • OldGringo

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    OK, while I agree with much of your well reasoned comments, here is another reality. As one of the aging populace, there were 76 million baby boomers of which only 65.2 million are still living. Within 20 years, the rest of us will be dead (dead) as voters). Today some schools, like Oklahoma City for example have 40% of the students as either illegal or the children of people illegally in the US. All of them are Hispanic, mostly from Mexico. Those kids will likely be voting in 10 years, at least the ones that were born here. Hispanics tend to vote Democratic as do Black people. The baby boomers are largely white. SO, the reality is, unless there is some radical wakeup, the Democratic party will control this country in about 10 years due to the new ‘voting block”. That is the trend so things like bump stocks in my view were never going to survive. Ah yes, the young voters, millennials? Should 18 year old people be allowed to vote for which president gets to choose to start a nuclear war? You will recall, the idea behind the 18 year voting age was they got drafted and many went to die in this country, so at least they should get to vote, right? Yet in every state they are not mature enough to even buy whiskey, now why is that? Because everyone agrees, psychologists, cops, politicians, all agree they are not mature enough to buy alcohol. Yet they get to vote on who gets the nuclear button and who gets to own guns. Oh yes, 99% of them will never serve in the military and most will not even know a person who has died in a war or conflict. Just saying, Trump was the lesser of the evils. Certainly a jerk and immoral person, if you believe the media and on those issues I do because there is just too many of them. But he is by far the best name out there. As far as global policy and international relations, I am a retired military officer and worked for several presidents and my recollection is that none of the prior global policies have served us very well. Clinton would have bankrupted the nation in 4 years, and she was/is not smart enough to even understand the long term impact of things like selling the Russians 20% of US uranium. There are decisions you make that can be never be undone and that was certainly one of her worst. I guess I am ranting, but little issues like gun control will soon be big issues, and people like Trump and groups like the NRA are like a parachute, not ideal, but the best options as the plane starts down. Enjoyed your comment, keep it up.

    Reply

  • Dogtired

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    This never has been or will be an issue of public safety. Anyone who claims it is at this point is willfully ignorant, unable to differentiate truth and error or fact from fiction, or party to the ideological desire to destroy our liberty and republic. Slide Fire is the first of what will be many, many more sacrificial lambs laid on the alter of the antigun crusade.

    Shame on our l elected officials, most of all our President, who should be truly ashamed of himself. For all his vaunted genius and rejection of political insider behavior, he is either unable to understand the implications of his actions and the irrationality of punishing hundreds of thousands of law-abiding citizens for the actions of one, or he is playing politics to try and gain favor with those left-of-center voters who aren’t left-wing ideologues but never give much second-order thought to the Constitution and see bump fire stocks as inherently evil. If he is incapable of seeing the inherent contradictions in his actions, or worse yet, doesn’t care, where will it end?

    Of course, the real problem here is that Trump is a populist without a developed, coherent belief structure. As a businessman he didn’t need one. As a president, I it’s a crucial characteristic to possess.

    Obviously I knew what he was when I picked him up. I knew he was a populist when I voted for him and saw him as the lesser of two evils. Clinton, I believed, advocated policies that would bankrupt the nation and destroy what is left of our constitutional republicanism. Trump harbored no particular ill-will toward the republic that I could discern (and wasn’t a traitorous felon like his opponent), yet I worried about his lack of a coherent or comprehensive political world view. That made him less odious than Clinton, but still potentially dangerous because he has no core guiding principles outside of generally trying to do what he thinks are good ideas.

    That guiding principle has served Trump well on issues such as border security, Iran, and North Korea. It has also led to poor and destructive policy decisions such as taking the nation down a protectionist path and seeking compromise with the left on gun control. Let me offer an easy rule of thumb: any time Chuck Schumer out Bernie Sanders are giving you a thumbs up you should start questioning your position. While there are things we ought to compromise on, Trump is the one offering concessions on guns and getting nothing in return.

    Trump is the quintessential populist, able to pick up on currents in mainstream America–especially those from the vast swath of unwashed masses (as the liberal elite believe them to be) residing in “flyover country” whose voices the media have denied for decades. Trump is far more the voice of middle America than he is the intellectual leader of his party. Unfortunately, the nation needs someone who can be both. While his brand of populism is generally in line with constitutional conservatism, the two are at times at loggerheads. At those times, Trump invariably sides with popular opinion rather than the Constitution or principles with a proven historical track record. When you lack an internal compass, you cannot lead, you can only react.

    Populism is a dangerous tool, and has historically been adopted by the left for promoting its political agenda. Populism relies on pathos, particularly anger and indignation to rally people to its cause. The politics of emotions is antithetical to reason, logic, and understanding. It is a powerful tool that creates demagogues like David Hogg, Chuck Schumer, and Barak Obama who draw crowds and call to action based on feeling, not reason, while harboring a deeper agenda.

    It is clear that Trump is also a demagogue. While we couldn’t do any better under the circumstances, and we can take comfort in the notion that he is “our demagogue,” he will invariably disappoint. It is crucial that like-minded gun owners and others who respect and understand our constitutional framework continue to pressure him, as loudly and as often as we can, to follow a constitutional path. He won’t do it on his own.

    For constitutional conservatives, truly we have no political leadership representing us. Those who try–Ted Cruz, Mike Lee, Rand Paul and a handful of others–are pilloried, lampooned, and relentlessly mocked in the press. They never stand a chance. If only we had a leader with the irreverence of Trump and his ability to tap into pathos, coupled with the brilliance and internal compass of Cruz–someone who could lead the nation away from the precipice, not be led by it, intellectually staggering to and fro like a drunkard trying to find his footing. We are, as a nation, dangerously close to the brink. Heaven help us if we stumble in.

    Reply

  • Something to Think About

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    Over 3000 teens aged 16-18 were killed in auto accidents while driving and over 235,000 were injured while driving costing over $10 billion dollars annually. The use of cell phones and distracted driving adds another dimension raising the death toll even higher.

    Over 44 people have been killed when run over by terrorists in the last year. Should we think about outlawing automobiles and teen drivers.

    The point is other law abiding citizens drive carefully and respectfully do they need to be punished because the statistics about teens and terrorists support the fact that automobiles should be heavily regulated. How much regulation is enough?

    Reply

    • OldGringo

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      https://www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/distracted_driving/index.html
      Actually, there are 391,000 distracted driver accidents per year, or more than 1,000 per day. There are about 12,000 homicides with guns each year. Most are drug/alcohol related or gang and drug deals. ALL OF COURSE ARE CRIMINAL ACTS. In my college classes I tell my students, this is the best example I can think of when a statistically irrelevant fact drives policy. Well meaning people with very limited mental abilities, just act impulsively and irrationally. For example, there is virtually no reason for people to own chainsaws when the live in large cities, like New York. But every person in every high rise, has the right to own one, or a hundred of them, why do we let that happen? You get the idea. Everyone, everywhere has the need for self defense options. Duh?

      Reply

  • Daniel DeFauw

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    These stupid politician just don’t have a clue!
    It’s not the guns fault in any criminal shootings, it’s the idiot operating the gun!!! If they keep trying to change the owning of legal guns to law abiding citizens the only ones that’ll have them is the criminals cause they don’t care about the laws!!! Get your sh** together politicians.

    Reply

  • Steve

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    Has anyone seen the guns that were supposedly used with the bump stocks on them? They had plenty of time to manufacture their false evidence under the cloak of secrecy in this investigation. I don’t trust anything about this false flag operation.

    Reply

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