SIG Pro SP2022: The Worst Kept Sig Secret

By CTD Mike published on in Firearms, Pistols, Reviews

In 1998, SIG SAUER announced that they had developed a polymer-framed version of their SIG “classic” design that started with the P220 way back in 1975. The SIG Pro was a full-sized service pistol designed for military and law enforcement, featuring a smooth double action/single action trigger and the familiar sights and ergonomics of those legacy SIG pistols. SIG joined Glock and HK as one of the few major firearms manufacturers to embrace a polymer frame at that time. In one way, the SIG Pro was way ahead of its time, featuring a replaceable back strap to change the thickness of its grip to fit both large and small hands. The next time you read a manufacturer’s claim that their gun features new innovative replaceable grip inserts, remember that SIG did it almost 15 years ago.

Sig SP2022

Accuracy with the SP2022 is flat out excellent.

The SIG Pro has evolved a bit over the years. When first introduced, there were many competing designs for methods to attach a light or laser to a pistol, but a decade later the 1913 Picatinny rail has become the standard. The original SIG Pro had a SIG designed light mount that looks similar to the ones on the HK USP and S&W Sigma. By 2003, the Picatinny rail had won out. When SIG released their latest version of the SIG Pro that year, designated SP2022, it featured the standard rail molded into the frame as well as a few other improvements, including a decocker that is easier to manipulate.

The SIG Pro always seemed to be the “ugly duckling” of the SIG SAUER product line. It certainly did not have the allure of the flagship P226, The Pistol Used By The Navy Seals. Many SIG Pros were chambered in .40S&W and .357 Sig, rounds once thought to be the ultimate in law enforcement calibers but whose popularity is now waning. Rightly or wrongly, the SIG Pro got a reputation as the SIG you can still buy when you aren’t able to afford a P226. When SIG introduced the P250 series of polymer framed, modular pistols in 2009, the marketing hype surrounding those guns made it easy for potential customers to forget that SIG had already been making polymer guns in the same calibers for a decade. It seemed like the SIG SP2022 was destined to be one of the best-kept secrets of pistol world.

Then an odd thing happened. The P250’s double action only trigger is proving unpopular with many shooters, and despite the fact that you can get a new P250 for the price of a used Glock, they haven’t caught on with many law enforcement agencies or any military units. At the same time, the street price of the all-metal “classic” SIGs like the P226 has skyrocketed to hundreds of dollars more than it was just a few years ago. So many polymer-framed pistols are on the market now that they are the rule rather than the exception, and this has helped wash away the stigma of the SIG Pro as a “poor man’s P226.” With its solid performance history, traditional feel and competitive pricing, the SP2022 slowly began to climb up the sales charts until we recently realized that its one Cheaper Than Dirt’s top 20 selling firearms so far this year. Now the secret is out—the fully matured SP2022 is one heck of a pistol for the money you’ll spend to get one.

Specifications and Features

  • SIG Sauer SP2022 semi-automatic handgun
  • .40 S&W caliber
  • 3.9″ barrel
  • 12 round capacity
  • Single/double-action
  • 10 pounds trigger pull double-action
  • 4.4 pounds trigger pull single-action
  • Four point safety system
  • Black polymer grips and frame
  • Stainless steel slide with black Nitron finish
  • SIGLite night sights
  • Accessory rail
  • 7.4″ overall length
  • 5.7″ tall
  • 1.4″ wide
  • 5.9″ sight radius
  • Weighs 29 ounces unloaded

Like it? Want it? Buy it!

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Comments (60)

  • phil c

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    had mine for over a year and i love it .40 cal any brand ammo and never a problem. got mine used from a police force. and is super accurate. purchased 2 xtra 40 cal mags on e-bay 2 for 40.00 brand new and they work fine ever have the ensignia.

    Reply

  • Don Arrowood

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    I enjoy a well built weapon. The SIG SP2022 is one of the best in .40 cal that I have seen. Many rounds and a year after buying mine I would do it all over again. Not one jam or stuck shell, operates smoothly and like I would want it to. It’s only as accurate as the shooter, so I get what I practice, you get what you practice. It does have a little more kick than a 9mm, but it is acceptable to anyone who has fired a .45 cal. There are several holsters out there that are made for the 2022, so look around. I currently also have a Hi-Standard .22 match w/6″ barrel, Rugar LC9, a S&W M&P9C, a S&W .357 revolver, and a STAG AR-15.
    I am 69 years old and have fired many weapons and I reload my own ammo, all calibers, except .22 cal.

    Reply

  • Joe Heinrichs

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    Purchased a Sig 2022 found out gun shot way low contacted Sig they said they sight there guns in using a combat sighting method . They said I needed to buy a number 10 rear sight to correct this inaccuratcy and send the slide back so it could be exchanged. Ok here we go 450.00 for the gun 50.00 for taxes 50.00 for the sight 40.00 to change the sight and 40.00 for field testing oh and I forgot they dont make or sell a number 10 rear sight with plain white dots so your forced to buy night glow so now you have to buy the front sight also 50.00 and 40.00 to change it.
    My opinion of the sig 2022 is its a piece of junk and sig sauer is an eye gouging company. Do your homework about combat sighting. First and last sig

    Reply

    • Wayne

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      Joe, so sorry you had issues with the sig pro. I own two of them and they are absolutely great accurate guns out of the box. Let me give you some tips about sights in general and specifically the sigs & sig pro’s. From factory sig zeros guns for 15 yards for most guns. They use a dot on sighting method. If you use a stop sign method with the bullseye just below target you will shoot really low. So use the front sight dot cover the target center. Next if you shoot low with a sig it is because the line of sight is very close to barrel center. You are holding gun too low in your stance and actually looking over the sight a little. Hold your stance higher and really look straight over sight picture. You will ping target every time. You don’t need a sight swap. I got that from the dumb customer service guy too. Talk with sig pro shooter there or the gun smith. They tell you the correct story. Sig laser sights every gun to be accurate within 2-3 inches before it ships. The gun is fine sorry you got jacked around. Talk to sig gunsmiths in service next time. The sig pro is a fantastic weapon for 400 bucks. Double action trigger out of box is the lightest and smoothest of any gun. Also start shooting a new sig at 15 feet standard defense range and work your way back to 25 yards.

      Reply

    • Wayne

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      Oh by the way sigs take about 500 rds to fully break in. Keep barrel wet with oil so the slide and barrel top polish and lap. Your sig pro will shoot under 2..0 inch groups at 20 feet. Gun will get more consistent as you use it oil it and shoot it. Use breakfree Teflon oil to lube your gun. Shoot it wet during break in slide and barrel.

      Reply

  • Commonwealth109

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    It’s probably easier to recognize now, then back when this article was published – but it is correct that most agencies are now going with .45 or 9mm. This is a change from some years ago when the .40 and .357sig were at their height of popularity. One state department recently went with 9mm with the option for .45. Common reasoning nowadays is the .40 has too much recoil which makes the 9mm more accurate in the most number of personnel in an agency. Plus, some will always want a .45 mo matter what, and so the .40 is not a .45. So believe it or not, it is now viewed as fitting neither need – instead of the perfect answer it was 10 years ago.
    Face it, 9mm with the right ammo (Hornady Critical Duty) can’t be knocked for effectiveness, and if more badges shoot it more accurately then the .40cal has lost out on most of the recent agencies’ decisions. I like the idea though, of letting badges choose a .45 if the prefer the wider cartridge.
    Interesting how caliber preferences ebb and flow. Both in LE and citizen arenas.

    Reply

  • Gordon Frampton

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    The first time I heard about the SP2022 I assumed that it was a Sig that was designed to fire .22 long rifle for training purposes. I think that the reason that the SP2022 is unpopular and therefore cheap – is that a lot of people share this misconception.

    Reply

  • Edward Surguy

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    I had one loved it would shoot after being in the mud it would shoot after being in the rain it was a very good gun but it would not take a trailer fire ha ha I’m trying to get another one right now. I like the 9mm the best it’s what I had.

    Reply

  • Steve

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    I stumbled across a used SP2340 in a gun shop years ago, didn’t recognize the model, liked the look and the fact it was a poly SIg, and bought it for < $400. I now own four- SP2022 in 9mm(German gun) and .40, 2340s in .40 and .357.

    At least 2000 rounds thru al of them, with not one failure beyond bad primers. Of the 50 or so pistols I own, one of these in .40 sits on my nightstand.

    The bottom line is this- if I had to pick up an unknown pistol to defend myself, it would be a Sig, and of the Sig models, preferably a SigPro.

    On the recoil issue- I find it is largely mental, then pistol design. Tell a new shooter about the .45's horrible recoil, and he/she will close their eyes, turn their head, and flinch hugely. Don't mention it, and they probably won't. Case in point- I introduced my 130 lb. girlfriend to pistol shooting starting with .22, then 9mm, .40, then .45. I never mentioned or discussed recoil, and neither did she. Her choice for her first purchase for a personal pistol? Kimber Ultra .45. On the other hand, I own two Sig P6/225s, whose recoil I find uncomfortable.

    Shoot what you like and, more importantly, can hit with.

    Enough rant out of me- have a great day at the range!

    Reply

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