SHOT 2014 — Smith & Wesson Model 66 Combat Magnum Revolver

By CTD Suzanne published on in News

The Model 66 saw years of law enforcement service from 1970 to 2005. The all stainless-steel revolver has a smooth, glass-bead finish and is chambered for .357 Magnum and .38 Special.

It has a 4.25-inch, two-piece barrel. The Model 66 will hold six rounds. The revolver also has a red ramp front and white outline adjustable rear sights and black rubber grip. Like the Model 69, the 66 features a full top strap and barrel serration and ball-detent lock-up.

Specifications

  • Model: 66 Combat Magnum
  • Caliber: .357 Magnum/.38 Special
  • Capacity: 6 rounds
  • Barrel: 4.25”
  • Action: Single/double-action
  • Sights: Red ram front and target white outline adjustable rear
  • Frame and cylinder: Stainless steel with glass-bead finish
  • Overall length: 9.7”
  • Weight: 36.6 ounces
  • MSRP: $849
Picture shows the back of a S&W revolver with the cylinder open and empty.

The .357 Magnum cylinder holds six rounds.

Picture shows the back of the S&W model 66 revolver.

The revolver also has a red ramp front and white outline adjustable rear sights and black rubber grip.

Picture shows a stainless steel revolver with black rubber grip.

For 2014, Smith and Wesson gladly reintroduces the Model 66 K-Frame service revolver.

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Comments (9)

  • R

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    If it did not have that stupid lock it would be a fine revolver.

    Reply

  • Richard from AZ

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    Big E3,

    Thanks for explaining the name history to me. I had to ask because sometimes there is a technical reason or advantage behind a name. This time I guess it’s just a trade name.

    Reply

  • Big E3

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    Richard, the K frame model 15 when introduced back in the day was named “Combat Masterpiece” it was basically a M&P 38 special with adjustable sights and a 4″ barrel. Smith later introduced the model 19 with a 4″ barrel adjustable sights in 357 mag this one was named “Combat Magnum”. Then each previous model came out in stainless steel, the 38 was named the model 67 and again “Combat Masterpiece” and the 357 was the model 66 “Combat Magnum”. It is the same as any company having names for there deferent models like “Redhawk”.

    Reply

  • Merle

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    I am wondering about the “two piece barrel”; just how is that done?

    Merle

    Reply

  • Tom

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    Don’t buy the “lawyers’ lock” nonsense. Let S&W eat it….

    Reply

  • Richard from AZ

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    Can anyone tell me why this one and the model 69 (a separate post today) are referred to as “combat”? What is the significance?

    I own a Ruger Super Redhawk 7.5″ 44 magnum. If that thing isn’t ready for handgun combat, I don’t know what is.

    Reply

  • David

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    I fired one yrs ago that had the trigger worked on. It was so smooth.. it was the best revolver I have ever shot.

    Reply

  • Brian

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    I still have my 1980’s 66 with nylon grip. It was my first LE sidearm. It is nice to see that there is still demand for it. I would prefer it without the lock if I was not very happy with the one I still enjoy.

    Reply

  • Boomer

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    Very nice revolver made with stainless steel and an excellent finish but is it worth the MSRP asking price? There must be more to this revolver than meets the eye.

    Reply

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