Quick Camping Tip: Five Essential Survival Items

By CTD Suzanne published on in Camping and Survival

Cheaper Than Dirt! Quick Camping TipYou planned, organized, created lists and prepared all your meals. After checking everything and getting it all packed, you feel confident you have everything you need for your camping trip. However, you might not have thought about these five essential survival items to take with you, just in case.

Even the most luxurious camping trip can have tragic consequences; bad weather, accidents, bears and getting lost are quite probable during even the shortest of trips. Pack these five items in your bag to secure your survival.

1. Emergency Tent

Rips from critters, bear attacks or even a horrible hailstorm can ruin your tent. An emergency Mylar tent will help you get through the night. The material acting as an insulator, the emergency tent can also double as a blanket on unexpected cold nights.

2. Signal

A whistle or signal mirror will alert others of your location if you float too far from shore, are lost searching for firewood or got astray while hiking.

Picture shows a red tent pitched on rocky terrain atop a mountain.

Such a beautiful spot to pitch a tent. However, if there is an accident, you will need to call for medical attention. A solar charger keeps your phone on.

3. Fishing Kit

If you do not secure your food properly, bears and raccoons can ransack your supplies. If you are camping anywhere near water, an emergency fishing kit will come in handy to secure dinner. You can buy a commercial emergency fishing kit or make your own—put a hook and line inside a mint tin or old medicine bottle.

4. Solar Charger

You should never leave all communications behind. Primitive camping and hike-in spots will not have electricity. Take a solar charger with you to keep your cell phone charged in case you need to call 911.

5. Personal Water Filter

We know that water is essential to our survival. Do not depend on the water at your campsite to be potable. If you are packing in water, have a back-up source just in case you run out. A small, compact personal water straw such as the Aquamira Frontier personal water filter straw  or the LifeStraw allows you to drink straight from the source and takes up hardly any space in your pack.

What is the one essential item you take to ensure your survival? Share it with us in the comment section.

SLRule

Introduced to shooting at young age by her older brother, Suzanne Wiley took to the shooting sports and developed a deep love for it over the years. Today, she enjoys plinking with her S&W M&P 15-22, loves revolvers, the 1911, short-barreled AR-15s, and shooting full auto when she gets the chance. Suzanne specializes in writing for the female shooter, beginner shooter, and the modern-day prepper. Suzanne is a staff writer for Cheaper Than Dirt!

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Comments (2)

  • Mike Beckham

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    If I had to choose only one item to take with me into the wild, it would be a personal water filter, like the Life Straw. You must stay hydrated to travel or work on a shelter, gather firewood etc. It is hard to decide on one item, because in my mind there are two schools of thought on what to do priority-wise. Do you plan on long term survival, that is days or possible weeks, or do you count on making some emergency contact with others who can help you? Long term survival would dictate my first choice, the water filter. But If you were confident that there were others available to help you, then some form of communication device, like a whistle of signal mirror may be the best choice. Now if I could choose 5 items…….the choices would be much easier.

    Reply

  • Hank Alvarez

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    What was once known as a “rape whistle” was something I required all my SCUBA students to have attached to their buoyancy compensator inflator hose because it took less air to get someone’s attention than trying to call for help in an emergency. If nothing else, people are apt to come and see why you’re making all that noise, if only to shut you up. They come in both plastic and metal but I preferred plastic in the ocean. We now have ours attached to each of our bug out bags. I don’t know if they’d be a deterrent to bears and such but that’s a thought.

    This time of year there are great sales on backpacking tents that are light and could keep two people dry and out of the elements in an emergency. I’ve seen some that are open but I prefer the dome tents with a zippered closure and a vent. It’s nice to have a floor and preferably a rain fly cover. Mine only weighs about two pounds in the sack and I think it only cost me about $40 on sale. For regular camping you might want something bigger and a little more substantial. Hank

    Reply

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