Lightfield Less Lethal 12 Gauge Rubber Slugs

By CTD Allen published on in Ammunition, Ballistics, General, Reviews, Self Defense, Shotgun Ammunition, Shotguns

The Lightfield Home Defender 12 gauge rubber slugs are a very good choice for those who are concerned about using standard shotgun shells. However, less than lethal does not mean these rubber slugs are not lethal. They can cause serious bodily injury and death can result from using them on a live target.

Lightfield Less than Lethal Rubber Slugs

Lightfield Less Lethal Rubber Slugs

Generally, those who choose this ammunition intend to use it in confined spaces or multiple family homes like apartments, townhouses, or even smaller single-family homes where a standard bullet could penetrate the walls and enter other rooms or dwellings. Another reason may be a person’s apprehension at using highly lethal standard shells.

At 630 fps, the velocity of the rubber projectile, along with the potential kinetic energy transfer of 103 ft-lbs, make this a powerful weapon. However, several variables can alter the results. The distance to the target, the size of the target, how much clothing the target has on, and the use of substances that alter pain compliance, all affect the performance of this shell.

At the least, when the shooter fires this projectile from a 12-gauge shotgun, it is going to cause serious bruising and pain. If used in a home invasion scenario, I would be concerned that a person, who intends to invade my home while I was present, would be in an altered state of mind due to drug use. Pain compliance might not incapacitate them sufficiently until help arrived. At its best, this ammo can penetrate the body cavity and cause enough pain or physical injury that the intruder will discontinue or run away.

Again, the best advantage to this projectile is that it will likely fail to pass through the target, then walls, and into other rooms. Therefore, if you are looking for a potent alternative to the standard shotgun cartridge for home and personal defense, this is a very sound choice.

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Comments (2)

  • barry

    |

    whatever happened to reloading yer shotshells w/ rock-salt

    Reply

  • Bill from Boomhower, Texas

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    Nothing wrong with reloading shot shells Barry, with rock salt for dogs in the henhouse, or birdshot for hunting. However, Allen’s thread appears to be about defense use, and in a defensive scenario you would never want to use any kind of handload. That would surely come back to haunt you in court when the D.A. starts describing how you purposely concocted some exotic homebrewed intent to do harm sinister whatever, that’ll leave you trying to defend yourself all over again. As for the less lethal rubber, that stuff is made for L.E. officers to use in crowd control, prison inmate control, possibly in rare occasions such as subduing a suicidal hostage taker or something similar, where they need a quick and abrupt end to a situation by subduing without killing. In other words, use real, over the counter store bought buck or slugs, and be sure before you have to fire. Hopefully you’ll never have to, but think thru any and all possibilities so you are prepared mentally, as well as physically with the accuracy of firing your weapon if it should happen. In my opinion the rubber stuff will do more to cause the shooter pain in the end. No pun. Happy trails.

    Reply

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