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Late Season Deer Hunting

As deer season progresses, deer become scarce quickly. It seems that as soon as the rut ends, they all just up and disappear.

Obviously, they’re still there, but where and how do you locate deer that seem to have gone nocturnal? It’s not easy, but late season deer can be hunted with success, you just have to adapt your hunting strategy.

Many hunters fill their tags within the first few days of deer season. What’s more, fierce winter weather deters many hunters who don’t want to endure the elements in the late season. For the late season deer hunter, this is good, as it means that you won’t have to worry about large numbers other hunters being around. Deer are often pressured early in the season when there are large numbers of hunters eager to get their deer during the rut. In the past I’ve had great success hunting deer as late as January when they’ve had time to relax from the pressure of early season hunting.

During the rut, many hunters set up in the early morning in blinds and tree stands where they will be able to rattle or call up a buck. But the rut is a crazy time for deer, between intense hunting pressure and the powerful hormone drive to mate. When deer go nocturnal, relenting to the pressure of the onslaught of hunters, they are less active in the early morning. The midday and afternoon however can be more productive.

Too many hunters hunt the rut exclusively, thinking that deer behavior during that time is “normal”. It is not – deer are so caught up in their hormone driven activities, they throw caution to the wind. It is only as the rut fades that deer return to normal.

No matter how much or how little hunting pressure there is, deer still need to eat. After the rut, bucks turn their attention to food. All of the sparring and mating of the rut leaves most bucks run-down and searching for food. Likewise, does that have been bred during the rut increase the amount of food they consume. Though they remain bedded down during the day, by the afternoon they become hungry and are forced to head back to forage at nearby food sources.

Identify food and water sources. Deer will bed down nearby to established food and water sources. When the pressure is on, they won’t want to travel far for fear of being exposed. Fresh hoof prints and droppings are signs of activity that will allow you to easily identify where the deer are feeding, and which trails they are using.

Once you’ve identified a food or water source, find the deer trails that lead back to their bedding areas. Bedding areas are carefully planned by deer: they are extremely good at choosing bedding locations with multiple escape routes. It is extremely difficult to stalk a deer that is bedded down. A bedded down deer that scents you will explode out of the bedding location and all you will see is the white flash of tail as it bounds away at breakneck speed. Even if you do get the drop on a bedded down deer, it is still difficult to get a good shot at a vital area.

To hunt bedded deer, set up near the identified food source, or along an active trail to and from the food source. Pay close attention to the wind direction to avoid alerting the deer to your scent.

Finally, it’s not unusual to have a second, or even third rut. Though not nearly as active as the first fall rut, secondary ruts can still bring out the bucks and does who have not been bred in the first rut. Does will reach estrus every 28 days, so if you’ve pinpointed the first rut, knowing when the second rut will come is a simple calculation.

In a secondary rut, rattling will not be quite as productive as grunting and calling, but you can still rattle up the odd buck or two. It’s not unheard of to find two or even three of four bucks chasing a doe during the second rut, completely oblivious to anything going on around them. Giving a few soft grunts or a short rattle can bring the deer your direction and present you with a shot.

If you don’t mind facing harsh weather and deer who are back to their usual cautious ways, then the late season is for you. Scouting ahead to identify where the deer are and where their trails are is key, but once you’ve identified them, you can rest easy in the fact that the deer will come.

Picking a pocket .380

Is your .380 enough gun? Lately, the market has been flooded by compact .380 ACP pistols, from the brand new Diamondback .380 to the Sig P238 there are a ton of options out there for shooters looking for a compact pocket gun. In fact, Cheaper Than Dirt! recently went over some of the more inexpensive pocket .380 pistols available. Having carried a .25 ACP in a pocket for quite some time, it’s safe to say that I’m a firm believer that the .380 you carry is a step above the 9mm or .45 ACP that you leave at home because it’s too heavy.

The current generation of pocket guns have some serious strengths and weakness as well.  Starting with the Ruger LCP and Kel-Tec guns, the sights are essentially non-existent.  Both the Ruger and the Kel-Tec sport what is commonly called a “gutter sight” which means that instead of the traditional 3-post set up we’re all used to, there is a trough down the middle of the slide.  All of these pocket pistols benefit greatly from the addition of Crimson Trace Lasers, but this goes more so for the LCP and the Kel-Tec.  By adding the Crimson Trace Laserguard for the LCP to your gun you then greatly improve your ability to hit close targets faster and to hit distant targets period.  Using a Crimson Trace equipped Sig P238 (pictured above) I was able to make consistent hits on an IPSC A/C zone target at 25 yards.  The Sig P238 doesn’t even need the Crimson Trace as much as the LCP as it has excellent factory night sights; and yet even on this gun it just makes sense to add it.

The next issue that you’ll encounter on these pocket guns is the trigger.  I like the Ruger LCP – I think it’s a great defensive firearm.  I don’t like the trigger very much.  The same can be said for the Kel-Tec, Diamondback, Bersa, and pretty much all the pocket .380s with the exception of the Sig P238 (again) which has an excellent single action trigger.  But that’s not without problems of its own, as the Sig P238 must be carried cocked-and-locked with the safety on…in a pocket.  That might be an area of concern to some gun owners, in which case a double action gun such as the LCP might be a better bet.

Of course, the most critical issue with the .380 is ammo selection.  The debate will continue to rage whether the .380 is “enough” gun, and whether or not you should use ball ammo to get more penetration or use JHP ammo to get more expansion.  The BVAC ammo at the right is a 90 grain JHP at approximately 1000 FPS using a Speer hollow point bullet.  I tend to prefer hollow points for .380 ammo not because I think they improve my stopping power but rather because a hollow point bullet is less likely to glance off the hard bones in the rib-cage if used in a dynamic critical incident.  FMJ rounds are great for practice and training, but for defensive carry I definitely want the heaviest, fastest hollow points I can get for my .380.

The final thing to consider for your defensive .380 is reliability and learning curve.  Your gun must run the ammo that you choose for it reliably.  If you carry the BVAC ammo above, it needs to work in your gun.  You also need to practice with you gun, and not just standing on the range.  A .380 that’s carried as a last ditch defensive weapon needs to be something that you can draw and get quick, accurate hits with.  Would you take a defensive shooting class with a Ruger LCP?  I honestly don’t know if I would, but it’s something to think about.

When selecting a defensive pocket gun, remember that the first rule of a gunfight is “have a gun”.  The .380 you have beats a .44 at home, but if you have the wrong ammo or can’t hit with your .380, it’s not much better than a magic talisman.  Carry your guns…but make sure your gear is the best you can get.  After all, your life may depend on it.

Choosing the Right Clothing for Carrying a Concealed Handgun

Many customers of Cheaper Than Dirt! legally carry concealed handguns. But often, we get questions on the best way to carry concealed. While holster selection is important, equally as important is the clothing you choose to wear.

It’s important to note that if your carry method is uncomfortable, or if it is a struggle to keep your firearm concealed, more often than not concealed carry licensees will instead choose to leave their firearm at home. Therefore, special consideration must be given to the method of carry and the clothing used to conceal your firearm.

Carrying a concealed firearm in the winter is usually not a problem. Heavy winter garments provide a number of ways in which you can easily conceal a firearm. But when indoors, or in warmer weather, keeping a firearm concealed can be problematic unless you have an appropriate wardrobe.

Remember – the whole idea of carrying concealed is to not have your firearm detectable. What’s more, you don’t want to advertise that you might have a concealed firearm by wearing the ubiquitous tactical vest or fanny pack. While these methods are fantastic for concealing a firearm, they are also universally recognized as being worn by individuals who are armed. The same goes for most tactical BDU-style cargo pants and tactical style shirts.

So, how do you conceal your handgun without looking like some suburban tactical operator?

First, let’s take a look at pants. Many who carry concealed use an Inside-the-Waistband-Holster (IWB). These style of holsters fit between the waistband of your pants and your body, holding the firearm very close to your body. Having a firearm carried in this fashion reduces the chance of “printing” (having the outline of the gun show through your clothing). But using an IWB means that the waist size of your pants will have to be slightly larger. I find that pants one size up (ie: 36″ waist instead of 34″) help to accommodate the extra bulk of having a firearm tucked in your waistband. Tactical style pants such as Tru-Spec’s 24-7 Ripstop Pants are great for carrying a concealed handgun. They feature elastic comfort stretch waistband, and have lots of pockets for spare magazines and a tactical flashlight. The best part is that they don’t scream “Tactical” – instead, they have the appearance of more conservative Docker-style khaki pants.

If you choose to wear jeans or slacks, pay attention to the construction of the waistband and belt loops. Make sure that they are sturdy enough to bear the extra weight and strain of a holster. When choosing a belt, you will also need to select a sturdy belt that can stand up to the extra work. This Ranger Belt by Triple K is a great example. It is specifically designed with belt holsters in mind, but it is still stylishly designed so that you can wear it anywhere.

Your upper garment takes a bit more time and consideration to choose properly. If you are carrying a compact handgun in a “tuckable” holster, you will have more leeway in your choices. Tuckable holsters are IWB holsters that have belt clips which allow a shirt to be tucked in, concealing the handgun. Still, this method does not usually work as well with full size autos.

In the summertime especially, selecting an appropriate cover garment can be difficult. My standard summer carry method is a t-shirt tucked in, a handgun in an IWB holster, and a loose-fitting Hawaiian-style shirt over that. Something nondescript with longer shirt tails for better concealment, such as our Tru-Spec 24-7 Field Shirt would also work fine. Again, I usually purchase shirts one size larger than normal. A good cover garment should hang 5″ – 8″ below the waistline of your pants in order to adequately conceal your firearm while kneeling, bending, or reaching up.

When choosing a shirt for a cover garment, pay close attention to the fabric thickness and color. Light-weight and loose-weave fabrics can print easily, and some are so thin that they will even show a visible outline of the firearm. Light-colored fabrics can also show the darker outline of a firearm. In the summer, look for fabrics like linen or cotton which will not only keep you cool, but will also be able to conceal your handgun.

Choosing to carry a concealed firearm is a big responsibility. Part of that responsibility is following your state’s laws on keeping your firearm concealed, and that means choosing your clothing carefully. It may take a few additions to your wardrobe, but with these tips and a few extra pieces of clothing you will have no problem carrying concealed, no matter what the weather or occasion.

Cleaning Your Molle Gear

You’ve got the gear, you’ve assembled your kit, gone out into the field, and now you’re back, and your gear is covered with all manner of dirt, mud, leaves and brush. How do you safely clean your MOLLE gear?

Red dummy bullet

Dry-Fire Training at Home

I recently shot a local IDPA (International Defensive Pistol Association) match. I did OK but noticed a couple of problems that slowed me down significantly—namely, quickly and smoothly drawing from the holster and pressing forward to the target.