Iowa Becomes 42nd State to Pass Hearing Protection Legislation

By Dave Dolbee published on in News

One more state finally gets it! The movies are not reality and suppressors are not dangerous in the hands of citizens. In fact, they have several beneficial applications in hunting and target shooting as well as protecting the shooter and those in the immediate surrounding area.

This week, on Thursday, March 31, Governor Terry Branstad (R) signed House File 2279, the Hearing Protection Act, into law. HF 2279 passed the House of Representatives with a 74-24 vote and the Senate with an overwhelming, bipartisan 46-4 vote. HF 2279 will go into effect immediately.

Supressor Selection

Suppressors are a great addition to most any caliber. They make shooting fun and reduce the chance of negatively affecting your hearing or those around you. In a home defense scenario, this is a serious consideration.

This makes Iowa the 42nd state to pass such legislation and legalize sound suppressors to be sold, used, and possessed. It also makes Iowa the 38th state to legalize suppressors for use while hunting.

The Suppressor Benefits

Suppressors foster a safer and more enjoyable shooting and hunting experience and will help ensure the propagation of Iowa’s rich hunting heritage while protecting the hearing of the shooter.

Suppressors also reduce the felt recoil of the shot. This, combined with the noise reduction, help to increase accuracy—especially with new shooters by reducing the tendency to flinch or anticipate the recoil. Less flinching allows the shooter to better focus on the mechanics of the shot and sight alignment. However, the biggest benefit is undeniably the hearing protection of the shooter and those who may be in the immediate vicinity.

As a side note, personally, I would like to see more suppressors issued to our men and women of the armed services. Far too many from each conflict either come home with hearing loss or develop it years later as a result. But for now, I’ll celebrate Iowa’s victory and await the day when a few more “straggler states” finally adopt common sense legislation to protect the hearing of its residents.

Let’s not forget where we owe credit for this victory. Far too often we celebrate the victory in silence without giving our due to the lawmakers, 2A groups and individuals who made it happen. Representative Matt Windschitl, Representative Terry Baxter and Governor Branstad all signed the bill and played a role in in its being brought for a vote. As for the grassroots effort, NRA members, Iowa Firearms Coalition, and the American Suppressor Association all deserve a tip of our hats for joining the fight for our Second Amendment rights.

Do you own a suppressor? Have you ever shot one? What suppressor tips can you share with other readers of The Shooter’s Log?

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Comments (38)

  • Hide Behind

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    Not bragging of killing feral cats, just telling it as things were back then, and if you open your eyes and ears you will find metrp areas are thinking of trapping and hiring shooters as they already do with pigeons.
    The infestation of feral cats has led to vast declines in wild birds in urban areas, these wild birds some of which in hummingbirds case are now endangered, include ducks ( ducklings),
    Doves, Quail and native pheasants and grouse.
    Many of those peoples back then were land rich nut dirt poor, and I remember a.morn when upon opening up my chick raising pen I found 3 cats had.killed over 100 vhicks.
    Yes I killed them cats, and used.chicks for trap and crawdad baits.
    Those chicks cost , mixed run, some 2-3 cents each andbwe raised 5or 6 hundred up 52 canned for family rest sold $1.00 apiece plucked.
    Brother in law left truvk window down and a very large feral cat was.found sleeping on his seat, he grabbed it but it twisted bit into his palm and back legs pumped tearing ligaments and muscles plus infections that took couple months to heal and more for therapy.
    When man made unde $1.50 hr in mill his hids ate chicken a least once a week.
    Men took the meat left overs as lunvhakings.
    Cats also killed piglets as well
    Ever seen Maine Coon Cats, they get huge 20+#’s, and I senn a couple at diffetent times take on linx or bobcat kits to the death.
    Amd yup you can eat cats I sold many to dmall asian community and to mink ranchers.
    Only one or two real killers to just kill in the wild, weasels ermine and mink ptters of all varieties Wolverines, mdest killer God evrr made, and just like some high and lowlifes, if they cannot eat it, or screwnit they will just kill and piss on it so no one else wants it.; but none of them compare to
    numbers killed by feral cats, none of them.
    Also was a time when maybe just maybe as a pup or aged old farm protecting or hunting dog could stay in house on -20 degree days and nights, but no damned civilized human would let a filthy pissing cat enter withi. One foot no mattr how damn cold it was.
    Some of todays cat lovers should try being affectionate with humans, but maybe it is only cats that will put up with them.

    Reply

    • ss1

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      @Hide Behind:

      Hi, I tried to come to your defense yesterday, but I don’t think my post got approved by the moderator. Sometimes those moderators don’t get my sense of humor.

      I like many of your past posts, and I like your backwoods background, and I believe that if you killed any cats then it was for good reason.

      Also, your last sentence above…..”Some of todays cat lovers”……..is ABSOLUTELY RIGHT ON THE MONEY!! THAT IS CLASSIC!! I have a cat lover living right next door to me, and she is a perfect example and one of the worst neighbors I’ve ever had.

      Reply

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