Intuit’s Policies on Firearms Business Don’t Add Up for 2A Companies

By Larry Keane published on in General, News

Intuit is most commonly known as  the maker of Quickbooks, Quicken and TurboTax. However, when it comes to Intuit’s online business accounting platform that processes credit card payments, Intuit has proven itself not to be very intuitive when it comes to firearms-related businesses. In fact, it has gone so far as to shut down the credit card processing services of firearms related businesses.

Intuit TurboTax logo

You would think that the company that started Quickbooks, TurboTax, and Quicken would be better at making things add up.

The Mountain View, California-based company, is spinning in circles after being questioned about the recent denial of service to two firearms-related businesses. Honor Defense, a Georgia-based handgun maker, and Gunsite Academy, a premier firearms training facility in Arizona, found themselves at a loss for financial services when Intuit recently shut off their accounts. Intuit stopped, reversed, and even held money that was in transit from customers. It did it without warning. Now, Intuit is offering competing reasons for why these things happened.

Ken Campbell, of Gunsite Academy, told the New York Post, they were dumped because Intuit believed they were selling firearms directly to customers. That’s not the case of course. Gunsite completes all sales through dealers that hold federal firearms licenses and conducts FBI National Instant Criminal Background System checks (NICS). Gunsite had just switched to Intuit when their service was abruptly halted. Intuit didn’t accept the explanation.

The same happened with Gary Ramey, president of Honor Defense. Funds were frozen, and his company had to scramble to recover money from their customers. “It’s a reality, small business is the backbone of America, and financial institutions are infusing personal bias into their decisions,” Ramey explained.

This is hardly new. Montana Tactical, a small brick-and-mortar store, suffered the same discrimination. It was the same story for The Gun Cabinet, Inc., in Conroe, Texas. There are plenty more.

Intuit said that it doesn’t discriminate against firearms business. It said it just requires sales to be conducted face-to-face. Except, Montana Tactical got a notice that their business was being cut off for Internet-based sales and because they sold gunpowder.

Intuit spokesperson Heather McLellan explained that companies agree to the terms of service, and if they can’t operate within the agreement, they reach out to the companies to explore solutions or work to transition them off Intuit’s service.

McLellan explained that their banking partner, J.P. Morgan Chase, requires all sales to be done in person—but that’s not true. A very reliable source told me that J.P. Morgan denies Intuit’s blame-shifting excuse and is not pleased.

You would think that the company that started Quickbooks, TurboTax, and Quicken would be better at making things add up.

Why do you think Intuit is targeting firearms businesses? Share your answer in the comment section.

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Comments (42)

  • Sherman Myers

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    Turbo Tax and Quicken are now owned by separate companies.

    Reply

    • rth60098

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      Not so, unless they changed hands overnight, Sherman. Both are still Intuit companies. Perhaps a different division, but still owned by the same outfit.

      Screw them!

      Reply

  • Tito

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    Totally agree with others, is time to find an alternative to Turbo Tax!

    Reply

  • Shadow

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    Yea several financial companies have started discriminating against firearm and firearm parts/accessories companies.
    they should be boycotted themselves by all 2A supporting people NRA and GOA members.

    Reply

  • Eric_CA

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    I’m done using Turbo Tax. I’ve been using Turbo Tax for several decades and will stop using them.

    I remember seeing a competitor that had an attractive deal to try them out.

    I dropped BofA and now will drop TT.

    Reply

  • Jakey

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    All the more reasons firearms related companies should accept bitcoin and the like as payments for online purchases. Nothing ticks off the liberal run controlled banks and payment processors / tech companies more than bitcoins. Even if you don’t have bitcoins you can use a service that converts your regular payments into bitcoins to use.

    I am with Intuit 4 Idiots on this one…I went to purchase a real copy of quickbooks pro…not the crap they have online for a monthly fee, but the modern desktop version of my old quickbooks pro I have been using for years and years….Then I got sticker shock… $595 bucks!! No way I found a cheaper NON INTUIT alternative at outright.com OUT RIGHT works great for me as I sell online and it works right out of the box for ebay amazon paypal etc

    Reply

  • John percival

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    ALL NRA members should boycott using TurboTax and tell all their friends to do same. These Liberals only learn when their pockets get hit hard. Especially since We NRA members are the few that PAY taxes.

    Reply

    • Randy Jones

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      Why just NRA members? Boycotting Inuit, Turbo Tax, Dick’s, any business that restricts our Second Amendment rights should be boycotted. I think the receipt of purchase of products or goods made else where should also be sent to the offending business. As they say in business, money talks.

      Reply

  • D. Fosdick

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    Time to find an alternative to Turbo Tax!

    Reply

    • rth60098

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      I’ve used H&R Block tax software ever since I told TurboTax to take a hike a decade ago. I never looked back. Screw Intuit. They are monopolistic thieves in my opinion.

      Reply

    • DJ_91505

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      Since roughly 2000, I have used TaxAct every year but one, when I tried TurboTax. I believe TaxAct can import your previous return(s).

      DJ

      Reply

  • Jim

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    I Have used Turbo Tax for years. I will be using something else next tax time

    Reply

  • David Ingram

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    I’ve been buying Turbotax bor years. I’m done.

    Reply

  • Hike The Ball

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    This is standard operating procedures (SOP) for totalitarians and Progressives (Leftists of all stripes).
    “Two steps forward; one step backwards” is the tactic — create restrictions then over-apply these restrictions; then back down. But the Leftists at Intuit are still discriminating against legal and lawful activity (gun ownership and use) which is their “one step forward”.
    This constant “picking away” at their adversaries/victims was used successfully ever since Marx & Engel (and S. Alinsky) wrote it down.
    There will be many other attacks on the gun and hunting industries (including fishing).

    Reply

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