“I’d Rather be Shot By a ‘Smart Gun’ Than Sell a Smart Gun”

By Dave Dolbee published on in News

“I’d rather be shot by a ‘Smart Gun’ than sell a Smart Gun”—That is a pretty strong statement and one that I am sure will resonate with the Shooter’s Log base. 60 Minutes recently ran a piece investigating ‘Smart Guns’ and opposition against them. You’ll have to watch and view the piece for yourself, but the National Shooting Sports Foundation‘s Steve Sanetti, took up the torch with a reasoned response.

National Shooting Sports Foundation Logo

Sanetti makes some good points. However, I would have liked to see the piece go a further (who knows how much ended up in the editing room’s floor…?). For instance, what happens when I want to let a friend shoot it at the range? What if I program the Smart Gun so my child can shoot it? A bit more on the technology and how it can be hacked or shut down by the government—not to mention the effects of a solar EMP. The last thing I want in a TEOTWAWKI scenario is shotgun that will only function as a lousy club.

Nonetheless, it is an interesting piece worth the watch—even if only to oppose the anti gunners. We have to be educated to their attacks to know how to counter them. Also, there is a real threat from this type of rhetoric. Remember, President Obama recently listed his biggest regret as not being able to enact gun control. He also has about 14 months left to run amok.

Here is the release the NSSF just sent:

The CBS news magazine program 60 Minutes Sunday night aired a segment on “Smart Guns” during which NSSF President Steve Sanetti answered questions from reporter Lesley Stahl and explained that the industry does not oppose the development of authorized user technology for firearms but that caution is warranted. “We have to be careful not to fall into the technology trap,” Sanetti said. “We’re not here saying that technology is a bad thing. Technology obviously improves our life in many ways. But I think you have to look at firearms in a slightly different way. Their mechanisms are the way they are over centuries of development. They’re at the state now that consumers want them and, in the United States, there’s a lot of tradition involved in firearms.”

Steve Sanetti National Shooting Sports Foundation

Click image to watch video.

Sanetti also explained that legal mandating “Smart Gun” technology, which the industry opposes, would punish the vast majority of responsible gun owners who as a matter of course secure their weapons safely away from children or others who should not be able to access them. Indeed, all guns can be secured today by means of the locks furnished by their manufacturers, or by the 37 million free locks distributed by the NSSF’’s Project ChildSafe, without the reliability disadvantages posed by “smart guns.”

“Why are you trying to take my firearm and add something to it that’s going to make it more prone to failure?” he asked, referring to the possibility that the technology might malfunction.

Perhaps the only new information to be covered in the segment came from New Jersey “Smart Gun” mandate law sponsor State Sen. Loretta Weinberg, who said that she would introduce legislation to repeal that state’s current unenforced law if firearms retailers, in return, would all agree to carry at least one model of an authorized user equipped firearm in their stores’ inventory.

See the NSSF’s Fast Facts on “Smart Guns” for detailed information on this issue.

What is your reaction to Smart Guns? How can we best ensure laws such as ‘The Mandate’ are squashed and our opposition to those thinking of marketing a Smart gun are heard? Share your opinions in the comment section.

SLRule

Growing up in Pennsylvania’s game-rich Allegany region, Dave Dolbee was introduced to whitetail hunting at a young age. At age 19 he bought his first bow while serving in the U.S. Navy, and began bowhunting after returning from Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm. Dave was a sponsored Pro Staff Shooter for several top archery companies during the 1990s and an Olympic hopeful holding up to 16 archery records at one point. During Dave’s writing career, he has written for several smaller publications as well as many major content providers such as Guns & Ammo, Shooting Times, Outdoor Life, Petersen’s Hunting, Rifle Shooter, Petersen’s Bowhunting, Bowhunter, Game & Fish magazines, Handguns, F.O.P Fraternal Order of Police, Archery Business, SHOT Business, OutdoorRoadmap.com, TheGearExpert.com and others. Dave is currently a staff writer for Cheaper Than Dirt!

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Comments (57)

  • chuck kelecic

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    State Sen. Loretta Weinberg: make the police purchase these smart guns for a ten year period, and if they work out, then we will reconsider.

    Reply

  • Nj RESIDENT

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    What makes you think that State Sen. Loretta Weinberg won’t reinstate the law she is saying she will ask to be repealed as soon as NJ gun dealers sell the first smart gun. Don’t be a sucker. In fact it’s a insult to your intelligence that they think you are stupid enough to fall for this game. Remember, they passed this law once. And they will pass it again as soon as it becomes enforceable by the first gun that would activates the law. Also remember according to the law it only takes a single gun to be AVAILABLE for sale to trigger the law into effect.

    Reply

  • don sykes

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    they keeping trying to chop our rights many chops NO rights !!!!

    Reply

  • Nick Liberto

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    Sarge,
    You have a good point…but I believe that at least 90% of cops are good guys…maybe more. I would offer that the secret service dudes that protect congress and the pres. should be the ones armed with this weapons

    Reply

  • James A. Turner

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    A sidearm is like a seatbelt. If you think You’ll ever need one you have to use it ALL The Time! Would you trust a seat belt that was battery powered with electronic circuitry involved. You never know if it’s working properly until you’re in an accident and find out the battery is dead or a transistor has failed. But that’s okay. if it fails take it back to the seller. I’m sure he’ll replace it. For your heirs, that is. By this time, you’re dead! I agree with Zmortis. Let the cops try it out first.

    Thanks
    J A Turner
    SSgt USMC(ret)

    Reply

  • Nick Liberto

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    Zmotis….The feds are not all in on these things as far as arming their personal guards with them. It’s a matter of telling everyone that something is good for us, but not necessarily for them. Same thing about Obama Care….if it’s so good, why does congress have something else? Why do most federal employees that are not rank and file, get waivers?
    The 2nd amendment is the keystone that holds the rest of them together and it was not given to us by an act of congress…so it cannot be taken by congress unless they open the floor to make changes in the constitution. I do not see that happening in my life time.
    Keep your powder dry.

    Reply

  • indiana steve

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    I have no problem with smart guns. I feel that anybody that wants one ought to be able to have one. I don’t want one.

    Reply

  • max

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    The cardinal rule of the tech-savvy man: NEVER become a beta tester.

    Reply

  • Nick Liberto

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    Joe in the midwest…you have made a valid and intelligent comment. The simple answer to the problem with gun related murder in our nation is to prosecute to the full extent, those laws already in force. We allow too many criminals to plea down from gun charges rather than getting them off the street. It is expensive to house these worthless slugs, but the cost of allowing them to go free and inflict harm to others, is far costlier.
    Thank you for your comments and keep your powder dry.

    Reply

  • Zmortis

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    I’ll try a “smart gun” sometime after my State’s police officers have universally adopted and used them for say 20 years without adverse incidents. Until then, it’s unproven reliability and questionable utility can be vetted by our government’s forces first.

    Reply

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