“I’d Rather be Shot By a ‘Smart Gun’ Than Sell a Smart Gun”

By Dave Dolbee published on in News

“I’d rather be shot by a ‘Smart Gun’ than sell a Smart Gun”—That is a pretty strong statement and one that I am sure will resonate with the Shooter’s Log base. 60 Minutes recently ran a piece investigating ‘Smart Guns’ and opposition against them. You’ll have to watch and view the piece for yourself, but the National Shooting Sports Foundation‘s Steve Sanetti, took up the torch with a reasoned response.

National Shooting Sports Foundation Logo

Sanetti makes some good points. However, I would have liked to see the piece go a further (who knows how much ended up in the editing room’s floor…?). For instance, what happens when I want to let a friend shoot it at the range? What if I program the Smart Gun so my child can shoot it? A bit more on the technology and how it can be hacked or shut down by the government—not to mention the effects of a solar EMP. The last thing I want in a TEOTWAWKI scenario is shotgun that will only function as a lousy club.

Nonetheless, it is an interesting piece worth the watch—even if only to oppose the anti gunners. We have to be educated to their attacks to know how to counter them. Also, there is a real threat from this type of rhetoric. Remember, President Obama recently listed his biggest regret as not being able to enact gun control. He also has about 14 months left to run amok.

Here is the release the NSSF just sent:

The CBS news magazine program 60 Minutes Sunday night aired a segment on “Smart Guns” during which NSSF President Steve Sanetti answered questions from reporter Lesley Stahl and explained that the industry does not oppose the development of authorized user technology for firearms but that caution is warranted. “We have to be careful not to fall into the technology trap,” Sanetti said. “We’re not here saying that technology is a bad thing. Technology obviously improves our life in many ways. But I think you have to look at firearms in a slightly different way. Their mechanisms are the way they are over centuries of development. They’re at the state now that consumers want them and, in the United States, there’s a lot of tradition involved in firearms.”

Steve Sanetti National Shooting Sports Foundation

Click image to watch video.

Sanetti also explained that legal mandating “Smart Gun” technology, which the industry opposes, would punish the vast majority of responsible gun owners who as a matter of course secure their weapons safely away from children or others who should not be able to access them. Indeed, all guns can be secured today by means of the locks furnished by their manufacturers, or by the 37 million free locks distributed by the NSSF’’s Project ChildSafe, without the reliability disadvantages posed by “smart guns.”

“Why are you trying to take my firearm and add something to it that’s going to make it more prone to failure?” he asked, referring to the possibility that the technology might malfunction.

Perhaps the only new information to be covered in the segment came from New Jersey “Smart Gun” mandate law sponsor State Sen. Loretta Weinberg, who said that she would introduce legislation to repeal that state’s current unenforced law if firearms retailers, in return, would all agree to carry at least one model of an authorized user equipped firearm in their stores’ inventory.

See the NSSF’s Fast Facts on “Smart Guns” for detailed information on this issue.

What is your reaction to Smart Guns? How can we best ensure laws such as ‘The Mandate’ are squashed and our opposition to those thinking of marketing a Smart gun are heard? Share your opinions in the comment section.

SLRule

Growing up in Pennsylvania’s game-rich Allegany region, Dave Dolbee was introduced to whitetail hunting at a young age. At age 19 he bought his first bow while serving in the U.S. Navy, and began bowhunting after returning from Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm. Dave was a sponsored Pro Staff Shooter for several top archery companies during the 1990s and an Olympic hopeful holding up to 16 archery records at one point. During Dave’s writing career, he has written for several smaller publications as well as many major content providers such as Guns & Ammo, Shooting Times, Outdoor Life, Petersen’s Hunting, Rifle Shooter, Petersen’s Bowhunting, Bowhunter, Game & Fish magazines, Handguns, F.O.P Fraternal Order of Police, Archery Business, SHOT Business, OutdoorRoadmap.com, TheGearExpert.com and others. Dave is currently a staff writer for Cheaper Than Dirt!

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Comments (57)

  • Nick Liberto

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    My take on the idea of a smart gun is that whomever came up with the concept is looking to market his/her idea. The inventor wants to make some money on this gadget.
    Truth of the matter is that the problem with guns is not the gun itself, but the lack of dedication by the folks that want to control our lives. If one weighs the cost of putting violent criminals away, versus the human lives that are ended by those violent people, it’s a wonder that the politicians can sleep at night. Of course, most of them have guards to watch over themselves and their families.

    Reply

  • Joe in Mid-west

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    This worries me greatly it IS just a way to disarm us. When all a hacker or federal agency has to do is click a button on a computer to make my gun not work I would carry a blade first at least a knife can’t be hacked. I will not give up my guns until the government puts a bullet in my head, for as soon as we are disarmed we become a victim and at the mercy of those with the power

    Reply

  • Nick Liberto

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    Dave, you’re absolutely correct. Those that would render the population helpless to stand up to govt. will continue trying to make inroads to destroy the God-given right our 2nd amendment gives us.
    Keep your powder dry.

    Reply

  • Dale Bailey

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    Less than a month ago I saw a video of a device for grounding drones .It was shouldered like a shotgun and emitted a beamed electronic signal that downed the drone . The same technology could be adapted to disable a ” smart gun “. I have a bad vision of a new ” Fast and Furious ” sending these devices to viscous criminals to stop police armed with required “smart guns “

    Reply

  • Dave from San Antonio

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    A firearm…is only as “smart” as the person using it. This technology is doomed to fail. This is just another way to infringe on our rights. One question. IF this smart technology goes the electronic route…will it be able to be turned “off”, from a “central control”, rendering the firearm useless? My guess…is yes.

    Reply

  • Bill Honrath

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    Interesting, isn’t it, that the same liberals that say we can’t trust technology to insure a safe Keystone Pipeline, are the same liberals that say we should trust technology never to fail on a device used to save innocent lives.

    Reply

  • Gil

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    I remember the days when people were smart and phones, vehicles, and guns were dumb. Too bad those days seem to be gone.

    Reply

    • Joel

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      I get your point, and people, the masses, have definitely been getting dumber and dumber as time goes on.

      But sadly, people (as a group) have never been truly smart, or rather have never been truly wise. For people have been letting themselves, often willfully and even enthusiastically, be oppressed and subjugated by their leaders (kings, queens, emperors, dictators, pharoahs, khans, moguls, mullahs, popes, prime ministers, presidents, etc.) for pretty much ever.

      People are way too easily duped and misled. Humans are without a doubt both the smartest and the stupidest species ever to have lived.

      Reply

  • redneckcowboy

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    When I was working the streets as a police officer, there was the beginnings of the push for “smart guns” that could only be fired by a person wearing a special ring on the hand holding the gun. Sure enough, it worked part time. Part time is not good enough when your life depends on it. Also, there are times your hand you would normally use to fire your weapon is for some reason disabled or you are in a position you have to fire with your weak hand to maintain cover. Now you have an inoperable gun unless you have time to change the ring from one hand to the other, which you would not have time to do in a gunfight. It was also found that the magnetic mechanism could also be fouled by moisture or dust and fail. This is a stupid idea put forth by stupid people that have never been threatened by violence in their sheltered lives. They should get out from behind their bodyguards and sample the real world for a change.

    Reply

  • Mike Dugan

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    Smart gun, F**K you.

    Reply

  • Willie

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    I’m smart enough to shoot my gun .

    Reply

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