Have Gun Will Travel… Transporting Your Handgun Across the United States

By Suzanne Wiley published on in Consumer Information

This post is an updated version of the March 27, 2014 post titled Have Gun Will Travel… Transporting Your Handgun Across the United States.

The kids are out of school, longer days have you wistfully staring out the office window, and the summer city heat has you itching to get out-of-town. Yep, summer vacation is right around the corner. Summer is when the majority of Americans choose to take their leisure vacations. The U.S. Travel Association reports that 79% of leisure travel is taken via vehicle rather than air. Flying with handguns is a hassle. It is much more tempting to take your handgun with you if you are driving. Though we go on vacation to relax, have fun, and let our guard down just a little bit, we always need to keep safety in mind.

Picture shows an open concrete road through a plain, a blue sky with whispy clouds and a sign that reads, "open road."

If you plan to be driving through many different states, know each state’s laws and regulations on traveling with a firearm.

You must comply with each state’s firearms transportation laws, whether you have your concealed carry license or not. If you plan to be driving across country or through many different states, you will need to know each state’s laws and regulations on traveling with a firearm. Every state has a different set of laws in regard to how you may transport your guns. While traveling through heavily restricted states, the McClure-Volkmer Act of 1986, an amendment to the Gun Control Act of 1986 gives travelers a “safe passage” through restricted states if guns are unloaded and cased, or locked up, and kept inaccessible with the ammunition stored separately. Unfortunately, this law does not always protect travelers. Police pulled military veteran Lieutenant Augustine Kim over in Washington D.C. with his guns properly cased and stored, and they arrested him for four felonies. (Read the story here.)

The McClure-Volkmer Act however, only protects you if you are passing through a state with minimal essential stops such as fueling up, getting food, an emergency or bathroom break. Longer stops, such as a night in a hotel, visits with friends or family, or stopping at a tourist attraction can lead you to having to comply with all of those states firearms laws. If you decide to stay a night in California while carrying a banned gun, you will be breaking the law.

Laws frequently change. It is always your best bet to check the current laws of the states you are travelling in before heading out.

As of this writing, this is a state-by-state breakdown of the laws in each state in regards to transporting a handgun:

Alabama

Keep your handguns unloaded and cased in the trunk or locked storage area inaccessible to the driver and passengers, unless you have a permit to carry a concealed weapon in your own state. You may only carry a loaded, concealed handgun in your car if you have a permit. You may open carry in Alabama without a permit—certain restrictions apply.

Alabama recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

Alaska

Alaska has Constitutional Carry. A loaded handgun may be carried concealed or open in the vehicle. You may open or conceal carry in Alaska without a permit.

Alaska recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

Arizona

Arizona has Constitutional Carry. You may open or conceal a loaded handgun, even on your body anywhere in the vehicle. You may also open carry in Arizona without a permit—restrictions apply.

Arizona recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

Arkansas

Act 746 changed the language of Arkansas handgun laws. There is contention whether or not the change legally allows “constitutional carry.” Contact your lawyer, Arkansas Carry or your local law enforcement agency for clarification.
The law states:

A person commits the offense of carrying a weapon if he or she possesses a handgun, knife, or club on or about his or her person, in a vehicle occupied by him or her, or otherwise readily available for use with a purpose to attempt to unlawfully employ the handgun, knife, or club as a weapon against a person.

Arkansas recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

California

Handguns must be unloaded, cased and stored in the trunk.

California issues concealed carry permits on an “as needed” basis only and does not recognize any other states’ permits.

Colorado

Rifles, shotguns, and handguns can be stored anywhere in the vehicle. Magazines that hold more than 15 rounds are illegal in Colorado. You may open carry in Colorado without a permit—restrictions apply. Do not open carry in Denver without a permit.

Colorado recognizes the following states’ concealed carry permits: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Delaware, Georgia, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming

Connecticut

You may carry a handgun through Connecticut without a permit if you are passing through, competing, transporting it for repair, attending training or an organized collector’s group. The handgun must be unloaded, cased and unavailable to the driver and passengers. Magazines that hold more than 10 rounds are illegal in Connecticut.

Connecticut does not recognize any states’ concealed carry permits.

Delaware

You may keep a loaded handgun in the open, in the vehicle or an inaccessible location. You may open carry in Delaware without a permit, however it is highly recommended to exercise caution if you do so.

Delaware recognizes the following states’ concealed carry permits: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Kentucky, Maine, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah and West Virginia

District of Columbia

Guns must be unloaded, cased, and locked in the trunk. It is illegal for a handgun to be stored in the glove compartment or any console.

The District of Columbia does not recognize any states’ concealed carry permits.

Florida

Firearms can be loaded and concealed as long as they are cased and inaccessible, or can be in plain view in a snapped holster.

Florida recognizes the following states’ concealed carry permits: Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Alaska, Iowa, Michigan, Nebraska, South Carolina, West Virginia, Arizona, Idaho, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Dakota, Wyoming, Arkansas, Indiana, Missouri, North Dakota, Tennessee, Colorado, Kansas, Montana, Ohio, Texas, Delaware, Kentucky, New Hampshire, Oklahoma and Utah.

Georgia

Handguns may be unloaded, in a case and separate from ammunition inside the vehicle, or loaded and fully visible, or loaded and stored in the glove compartment, console or any other compartment.

Georgia recognizes the following states’ concealed carry permits: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Ohio and Wyoming.

Idaho

Picture shows a pile of ammunition in black and white.

Many states require ammo be kept separate from firearms in the vehicle.

If you do not have a permit to carry, loaded guns in the vehicle must be in plain view. If concealed in the glove box, your firearm must be unloaded. You may open carry without a permit in Idaho. Outside city limits, you may conceal carry without a permit if you are engaging in a firearm-related activity.

Idaho recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

Illinois

Firearms must be unloaded, enclosed in a case designed to transport firearms and directly inaccessible.

Illinois does not recognize any other states’ permits.

Indiana

Handguns must be unloaded in a case stored in the trunk, unless you have a permit to carry in your state. If you hold a permit to conceal carry in your home state, you may carry a concealed handgun in the vehicle.

Indiana recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

Iowa

Handguns must be unloaded, cased and inaccessible.

Iowa recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

Kansas

Kansas is a Constitutional Carry state. Your gun may be loaded or unloaded, concealed or in plain view while driving through Kansas.

Kansas recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

Kentucky

Loaded handguns may be concealed in your vehicle if they are kept in the glove box, center console or other compartment that was “originally installed in the motor vehicle by its manufacturer.” You may open carry in Kentucky without a permit—some restrictions apply.

Kentucky recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

Louisiana

Loaded handguns may be transported anywhere in your vehicle. You may open carry without a permit in Louisiana.

Louisiana recognizes the following states’ permits: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming

Maine

If your handgun is inside the vehicle, it must remain unloaded and kept in plain view, or cased and put in the trunk or another inaccessible area. You may carry in Maine openly without a permit.

Maine recognizes the following states’ permits: Delaware, South Dakota, Louisiana, North Dakota, Wyoming, Arkansas, Pennsylvania and Michigan

Maryland

Guns must be unloaded, cased and stored in an inaccessible area.

Maryland does not recognize any other states’ permit.

Massachusetts

Guns must be unloaded, cased and stored in an inaccessible area. Massachusetts has strict gun laws and is a state that will most likely enforce the just “passing through” provision.

Massachusetts does not recognize any other states’ permit.

Michigan

You may only transport loaded handguns through Michigan if you hold a license to carry from your home state. If you do not have a permit, keep the gun unloaded, locked in a case and inaccessible. You may carry openly in Michigan without a permit.

Michigan recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

Minnesota

All guns must be unloaded and securely cased.

Minnesota recognizes the following states’ permits: Alaska, Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, and Wyoming

Mississippi

A loaded and concealed handgun may be carried anywhere in the vehicle. Open carry of a handgun without a permit is legal in Mississippi. Mississippi has a limited permitless carry law. Off-body carry without a permit is legal. Disabled vets, active duty military and retired law enforcement may carry concealed without a permit.

Mississippi recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

Missouri

A loaded and concealed handgun may be carried anywhere in the vehicle—even on your body. Open carry is generally legal in Missouri without a permit; however, certain cities restrict the practice. Check with the town or city you are in.

Missouri recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

Montana

All guns may be loaded and transported anywhere in the vehicle, even on your body. You may conceal carry in Montana without a permit if you are outside city boundaries, hiking or camping. You may open carry in Montana without a permit.

Montana recognizes the following states’ permits: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, New York City, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming

Nebraska

Depending on where you are in Nebraska, a loaded handgun may be in open view if you do not hold a license to conceal carry. It is best to keep all guns unloaded and stored in the trunk while driving through Nebraska. You may open carry in Nebraska without a permit, however certain areas restrict it. Check with the local laws before carrying.

Nebraska recognizes the following states’ permits: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming

Nevada

Loaded handguns must be in plain sight or in the glove box but not concealed on your body. You may carry in Nevada openly without a permit.

Nevada recognizes the following states’ permits: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Delaware, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Minnesota, Mississippi Enhanced Permit, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming

New Hampshire

Loaded handguns are not allowed in the vehicle unless you have a concealed carry permit. You may open carry a loaded handgun in New Hampshire without a permit.

New Hampshire recognizes the following states’ permits, only if you are a resident of that state: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Utah, West Virginia and Wyoming

New Jersey

New Jersey has very strict firearms laws. The transportation of firearms is generally illegal in New Jersey unless you have a permit to carry issued from New Jersey. It is best to leave firearms at home if you plan to drive through New Jersey.

New Jersey does not recognize any other states’ permit.

New Mexico

Transportation of firearms in the vehicle is unrestricted. You may conceal or have in plain view a loaded or unloaded handgun. You may carry openly in New Mexico without a permit. Do not carry in an establishment that sells or serves alcohol.

New Mexico recognizes the following states’ permits: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Idaho Enhanced Permit, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, Nevada, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia and Wyoming

New York

New York has very strict firearms laws. All guns must be unloaded, cased and stored in an inaccessible location. If stopped, you might have to prove you are not staying in New York if you are transporting a handgun.

New York does not recognize any other states’ permit.

North Carolina

As long as it is in plain sight, you can keep a loaded handgun inside the vehicle. Otherwise, a loaded handgun cannot be concealed or readily accessible inside your vehicle. You can open carry in North Carolina without a permit—restricted areas apply.

North Carolina recognizes all other states’ concealed carry permits.

North Dakota

Handguns inside the vehicle must be unloaded and in plain sight or properly cased and secured. You may only openly carry a loaded handgun without a permit if you are engaged in target shooting, hunting or camping.

North Dakota recognizes the following states’ permits: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming

Ohio

Handguns must be unloaded and in plain sight inside the vehicle or locked in a case. Unless you have a permit to conceal, you may not have a loaded firearm in your car. You may open carry in Ohio without a permit.

Ohio recognizes all states’ permits.

Oklahoma

All guns inside the vehicle must be unloaded in plain view or cased unless you have a concealed carry permit. If you choose to case your firearm, the case must be visible.

Oklahoma recognizes all states’ permits.

Oregon

You may carry a loaded firearm in the car as long as it is not concealed or readily accessible. Each city in Oregon has different laws regarding carrying a loaded firearm in a vehicle.

Oregon does not recognize any other states’ permit.

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania is a restricted state. All firearms must be unloaded, cased, and stored in an inaccessible location. Pennsylvania is also one of those states that you must be just “passing through” while transporting your firearms. In most places, open carry is legal without a permit, but don’t open carry in Philadelphia.

Pennsylvania recognizes the following states’ permits: Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, North Carolina, North Dakota Class 1 Permit, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming and Arizona, Florida, Maine, Utah, Virginia for residents of those states only.

Rhode Island

For just “passing through” purposes, you may transport your firearm unloaded, cased and stored in an inaccessible location. Keep ammunition separate in a locked container.

Rhode Island does not recognize any other states’ permit.

South Carolina

It is legal to keep a loaded handgun in the glove box, console or trunk of the vehicle.

South Carolina recognizes the following states’ permits, only if you are a resident of that state: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Idaho Enhanced Permit, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia and Wyoming

South Dakota

As long as they are in plain sight, you can have loaded handgun inside the vehicle. Concealed, unloaded handguns are legal if enclosed in a space such as the glove box, center console or trunk. You may open carry in South Dakota without a permit.

South Dakota recognizes the following states’ permits: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, New York City, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming

Tennessee

A loaded firearm can be carried anywhere in your vehicle without a permit, open or concealed, just not on your body.

Tennessee recognizes all states’ permits.

Texas

A loaded handgun may be concealed anywhere in the vehicle.

Texas recognizes the following states’ permits: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, New York City, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio permits issued or renewed on or after March 23, 2015, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, and Wyoming

Utah

A loaded handgun can be transported either concealed or in plain view in the vehicle.

Utah recognizes all states’ permits.

Vermont

Vermont has Constitutional Carry. Handguns may be loaded and concealed in the vehicle without having a permit.

Vermont does not need to recognize any other states’ permits. You may carry a handgun in Vermont concealed or open without a permit.

Virginia

Loaded handguns in the vehicle must be in plain sight or in a closed container such as the glove box. Open carry without a permit is legal in Virginia. However, in urban areas you cannot carry a centerfire handgun that holds more than 20 rounds.

Virginia recognizes the following states’ permits: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Idaho Enhanced Permit, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming

Washington

You may not carry a loaded firearm in your vehicle without a concealed carry license or permit. All firearms need to be unloaded and cased. You may open carry in Washington without a permit with restrictions. You may conceal carry without a permit if you are hunting, fishing, camping or target shooting.

Washington recognizes the following states’ permits: Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, North Carolina, North Dakota (Class 1 Permit), Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah and Idaho Enhanced Permit only

West Virginia

A loaded handgun must be in plain view. You may open carry without a permit in West Virginia.

West Virginia recognizes the following states’ permits: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia and Wyoming

Wisconsin

No concealed firearms allowed inside the vehicle. Wisconsin has strict regulations as to what is considered concealed. It is best to keep handguns loaded or unloaded in an inaccessible a place. You may open carry in Wisconsin without a permit.

Wisconsin recognizes the following states’ permits: Alaska (permits issued or renewed after January 14, 2013), Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri (permits issued or renewed on or after August, 28, 2013), Montana, Nebraska, Nevada (permits issued or renewed on or after July 1, 2001), New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio (permits issued or renewed on or after March 23, 2015), Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virgin Islands, Virginia (non-resident permit only), Washington, West Virginia (permits issued after June 8, 2012) and Wyoming

Wyoming

Loaded handguns can be carried in your car as long as it is visible and not on your body. You may open carry a handgun in Wyoming without a permit.

Wyoming recognizes the following states’ permits: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia and Wisconsin

If you are going to take a road trip across many states, pre-plan your route so you know how to transport your firearms legally. In addition, since laws change frequently, it is best to double-check the current law in the state you will be visiting as to whether or not you may carry your firearm or if you will need to keep it locked up in the hotel safe.

The NRA has a complete “right to carry reciprocity and recognition” map that I highly suggest you look at before heading out with your firearm on your vacation. If you plan on flying this summer, read “How to Survive Flying in the Not-So-Friendly Skies.”

If you know a state law that needs updating from the above information, please tell us in the comment section and provide a link to the changed law.

NOTE: This post was last updated on August 13, 2015 to reflect recent changes in Minnesota, Nevada, North Dakota and West Virginia and Nevada.

SLRule

Introduced to shooting at young age by her older brother, Suzanne Wiley took to the shooting sports and developed a deep love for it over the years. Today, she enjoys plinking with her S&W M&P 15-22, loves revolvers, the 1911, short-barreled AR-15s, and shooting full auto when she gets the chance. Suzanne specializes in writing for the female shooter, beginner shooter, and the modern-day prepper. Suzanne is a staff writer for Cheaper Than Dirt!

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The mission of Cheaper Than Dirt!'s blog, "The Shooter's Log," is to provide information-not opinions-to our customers and the shooting community. We want you, our readers, to be able to make informed decisions. The information provided here does not represent the views of Cheaper Than Dirt!

Comments (112)

  • Joe

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    I don’t mean mean to argue, but there is no misconception on my part. When you applied for your LEOSA, you applied in the state or through the jurisdiction. You had to meet that state’s requirements to obtain it. If you fail to maintain those requirements they have the legal right to revoke it. Since I am originally from Illinois, they require all LEOSA permit holders to be range certified once a year regardless of your location. Failure to do so will result in revocation of the permit. They also reserve the right to restrict specific types of ammunition one carries. You need to broaden your horizons through various FOPs.

    Reply

    • G-Man

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      Talk about needing to broaden horizons, had you ever considered that I am an active Federal Agent. My issuing agency completely handles issuance of my LEOSA creds at a Federal level. The state or its jurisdiction has nothing whatsoever to do with the manner in which anyone, from any agency, applies for or holds their LEOSA credentials.

      Matter-of-fact, the FEDERAL act specifically spells out it is each officer’s agency which is the only entity responsible for the issuance of LEOSA credentials. There are no state held databases to track or revoke these FEDERALLY authorized credentials.

      Yes sir, you most certainly do have vast misconceptions on your part. Please stop trying to argue for the sake of it and try to learn something if you care to.

      There are Local Police, County Sheriffs, State Patrols, Federal Agents, Tribal Police, Railroad Police, University Police, U.S. Coast Guard, Military Police, Corrections Officers, and Court Officers to name a few… regardless of which department an officer hails, if they fail to maintain the FEDERALLY prescribed requirements for holding their LEOSA creds, no one at a state level would have the slightest clue as to how to go about revoking something they never issued to begin with.

      As well, they needn’t worry either; given the FEDERAL law automatically makes the credential invalid if a carrier fails to maintain the FEDERAL requirement. The annual weapons qualification MUST be accomplished by your agency or a certified instructor that regularly qualifies your agency. Again, the state has nothing to do with it.

      And finally, I must drive home the point that the LEOSA act was written in such a way that it prevents state jurisdictions from restricting ammunition types carried by LEOSA credentialed officers. The issue has been discussed ad nauseam by every agency to the point we are tired of the repetitive memos explaining it.

      I travel frequently in my job and attend many joint task force meetings and multijurisdictional law enforcement conferences covering everything from anti-terrorism to intelligence sharing and cooperation between agencies. I am regularly elbow to elbow with officers from all over the country and at all levels. Please trust that I know what I am talking about and put this to rest.

      Reply

  • Jay

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    What about HAWAII??

    Reply

  • James

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    Oklahoma is an open carry state.

    Reply

  • Mike

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    Many states say lock in a trunk. What about traveling in a pickup truck? No bed cover? Illegal to keep behind the seat?

    Reply

  • Thom Ream

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    I don’t mean for this to be a trick question. But if I’m from a state like Alaska that has no requirements for CCW, and travel to a state that acknowledges reciprocity, how does that work? I’m sure the short answer is “turn around and put your hands behind your back”, or “sign here, press hard, 4 copies”… but is there any legal standing to argue that your home state does not require a CCW therefore I don’t need one in “XYZ”?
    I live in Kalifonya, so I know what the answer is here, komrade. Land of the Freak, home of the Brainless. And only one conservative Governor in the last six it’s not likely to change for the better any time soon.

    Reply

    • Joe Grant

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      I think that Alaska has a Constitutional right to carry. Not a separate CCW law. If you are living the People Republic of California, you must live by their rules.If your official residence is in Alaska you should be good in all states that have reciprocity. But it would be a good thing to check before going there.

      Reply

    • Lance

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      Thom,

      I don’t get the joke about spelling with a K instead of a C, but if you dislike any state that much, why don’t you just move? You only have one life and it goes quick. Unless you are in prison or in the military, nobody is stopping you from moving on. If you don’t like it leave. From the list above, Mississippi sounds like a good choice.

      Reply

  • Joe

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    I think Joe Grant’s made a good point. There is an assumption here that different standards apply to LEOSA permit holders. True the permit is good for all 50 states. Yet the gun laws in different states still apply to LEOSA holders. The only exemption is an extension of police courtesy. The main difference is when, how, and if the LEOSA holder has to deploy their firearm, they are subject to meet that jurisdiction police regulations on the use of force. There are jurisdictions that view LEOSA as the same as a CCW holder.

    Reply

    • G-Man

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      @ Joe:

      I don’t really see where you think Joe Grant ever made that point. He simply stated the author failed to mention LEOSA. There was never really much more offered to make a point.

      Nevertheless, I must point out a bit of misinformation made on your part. You are incorrect to write, “the gun laws in different states still apply to LEOSA holders”. For instance my LEOSA creds prevent any state law from limiting the type of ammo I may carry.

      A good example would be New Jersey law which heavily restricts its citizen possession of hollow point ammunition. They may only store it in their homes and may only carry it to and from approved and registered firing ranges or when hunting. But in no way may they carry it as a self-defense load like LEOSA allows me to.

      Try carrying concealed in states that don’t honor other states’ reciprocity at all, yet I can legally carry in any of the 50 States as well as the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the possessions of the United States.

      For your statement to be accurate if the “gun laws in different states still apply “ to LEOSA holders, we’d be forced to get approval from each chief law enforcement officer when visiting “May-Issue” or “No-Issue” states. Yet we do not.

      And I have no idea where you got the idea that LEOSA holders “are subject to meet[ing] that jurisdiction[s] police regulations on the use of force.” That is simply not in the law anywhere.

      And finally, for you to write, “There are jurisdictions that view LEOSA as the same as a CCW holder.” – is also incorrect given that LEOSA is Federal Law meaning the individual states have no choice on how they view it. It is the highest law which trumps any state or local law.

      I could go on, but I hope now you get my point. Some of your misconceptions may stem from LEOSA specifically stating carriers must comply with a state’s magazine capacity laws as well as schools zones and state or federal building rules. But keep in mind, that is because the Federal Law dictates such specific requirements for LEOSA carriers to comply in such a manner; which has nothing to do with anything the states think they have to say.

      Reply

    • Joe Grant

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      Exactly. I was not trying to make a point. It was only and observation. No need to get your pants in a knot. But you need to re read that law about Leosa trumping all local laws.There are exceptions.

      Reply

    • G-Man

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      @ Joe Grant:

      The only thing in need of being reread is for you in what I wrote. You obviously skimmed it or have a reading comprehension problem. Nothing I wrote conflicts with the Federal LEOSA law; and that includes any exceptions it provides, of which, are granted by LEOSA and not the states.

      If a Federal law stipulates one must comply with certain aspects of a state’s laws, it is still the Federal law that is effecting compliance. Double-jeopardy would not protect someone were they to violate this portion of LEOSA because they could still be prosecuted both in a local court and then again in a Federal court.

      Regardless, as a former law enforcement officer (as you claim) you should know all Federal Law when found in conflict with a state or local law must preempt or “trump” all other laws. It is known in Constitutional speak as the Supremacy Clause (Article VI, clause 2) of the United States Constitution.

      …and my pants are not in a knot as I find setting the record straight quite enjoyable and stimulating. But thanks for your concern anyway.

      Reply

    • Joe Grant

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      Do you have a low self esteem problem?.
      You cannot seem give a response without injecting a personal slur of some kind.Questioning my intelligence, my truthfulness, my ability to understand. Section 928C (b) of HR218 clearly stated that this law does not supersede certain aspects of state laws. Those are the exceptions that I was referring to.

      Reply

    • G-Man

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      @ Jor Grant:

      First I must point out that once again you are re-projecting your own insulting attitude. My responses, if you look more closely, do merely match the discourteous language you’ve dished up to begin with. In other words you can initiate it but you can’t take it.

      As for Section 928C (b) of HR218, I’ve already clearly made mention of those 2 single-line restrictions within subsection (b) of the Act and then went on to explain how it is still the FEDERAL Law that prescribes such adherence and not the States; thus giving the Federal Government the force, not the States.

      At any time the Federal Government can revise the Act as they recently did in 2010 to add Military Police amongst other changes. You are just going to have to accept that the authority flows from the Federal Government and not the States in allowing one to carry under LEOSA.

      Reply

  • Joe Grant

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    Thanks for your opinion. I value it dearly.

    Reply

  • Don

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    I think Florida recognizes Texas CCW permits. Not shown in Florida listing.

    Reply

  • Paul

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    Please verify Nevada on accepting Arizona CCW permits. Last I heard once Arizona changed the qualifying requirements Nevada no longer accepted Arizona permits

    Reply

    • G-Man

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      @ Paul:

      Yes, Nevada is once again accepting Arizona CCWs. I don’t blame you for the double-take given it was not that long ago they dropped Arizona after it changed the course requirements. Apparently Nevada lets their Sheriffs’ and Chiefs’ Association approve which states are reciprocal. They very recently did an update and now include Arizona again.

      As always, this is something that could change again in any state – so it’s good that articles such as this spur conversation for folks to keep abreast. Likewise, with the political climate becoming ever so much more immature and vitriolic rest assured there will be future (liberal) state legislatures that will change their reciprocity laws just to punish more gun-friendly states.

      Reply

    • Bill

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      Effective June 18,2015 Arizona CCW permits are Valid in The State of Nevada.
      1) You must have your AZ. permit and ID immediately available when carrying concealed. 2) You CAN’T carry in a airport. 3) NO GUN signs do not have “Rule of Law” You have to be Verbally notified. 4) You CAN carry in bars. 5) You must be 1000 feet from an occupied structure to Target Shoot. 6) You CAN carry in Casinos (but may be asked to leave)
      7) The AVI is on a RESERVATION = NO GUNS.

      Reply

  • Joe Grant

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    Did I forget to mention that between my Law enforcement jobs in Kentucky, and Virginia, that I spent five years at the NRA in Fairfax VA, working at the Institute for Legislative Action. And that after much lobbying by us, that the Law Enforcement Officer Safety act was passed by Congress, and signed by President Bush in July of 2003? Guess that’s why I’m passionate about everyone knowing about LEOSA.

    Reply

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