FAA: Don’t Shoot At Drones

By Woody published on in Chronicle, General, Legal Issues, News

People who fire guns at drones are endangering the public and property and could be prosecuted or fined, the Federal Aviation Administration warned last week. The FAA released a statement in response to questions about an ordinance under consideration in the tiny farming community of Deer Trail, Colorado, that would encourage hunters to shoot down the flying aircraft.

The council of Deer Trail, Colorado, is considering issuing licenses to bounty hunters to take down any federal unmanned aircraft that impinges upon the "sovereignty of its airspace.”

The council of Deer Trail, Colorado, is considering issuing licenses to bounty hunters to take down any federal unmanned aircraft that impinges upon the “sovereignty of its airspace.”

The council of Deer Trail (pop. 546) is considering issuing licenses to bounty hunters to take down any federal unmanned aircraft that impinges upon the “sovereignty of its airspace.” According to the proposed ordinance, which will be considered by the town council at its next meeting on Aug. 6, prospective bounty hunters can get a one-year drone-hunting license for $25.

Shooters must use shotguns, 12 gauge or smaller, firing lead, steel or depleted uranium ammunition, and they can’t fire on aircraft flying higher than 1,000. No weapons with rifled barrels allowed, and no tracer rounds.

The council would pay $100 for mostly intact drones, or $25 for parts thereof, so long as the pieces have federal markings and the “trophies” become property of Deer Trail.

Resident Phillip Steel said he wrote the ordinance after he learned the Federal Aviation Administration “loosened regulations that would allow the flight of drones in domestic airspace.”

“Is it illegal? Of course it is. But it’s also illegal to spy on American citizens,” Steel told CNN in a phone interview. “If they fly in town, we will shoot them down.”

The FAA reminded the public that it regulates the nation’s airspace, including the airspace over cities and towns.

A drone “hit by gunfire could crash, causing damage to persons or property on the ground, or it could collide with other objects in the air,” the statement said. “Shooting at an unmanned aircraft could result in criminal or civil liability, just as would firing at a manned airplane.”

 

 

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Comments (53)

  • No One

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    Um, why not just find the radio frequencies these things are controlled from and jam them locally just long enough so the thing crashes? I mean, in lieu of the amusing prospect of target-practice! LOL! ;-)

    Reply

  • BR549

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    Not much is going to happen under 1,000 ft anyway, and with the low population in Deer Trail, the chances of someone getting hit are astronomical. If a drone came crashing into my house, I’m sure we’d all have a roof repair party and when the feds showed up to arrest someone, anyone really, there’d be a couple hundred well armed and not too happy rednecks waiting for them.

    No one would want to turn in the “perp”, so the townspeople would just have to warn the feds that the skies aren’t that safe over Deer Trail; nope, never have been ……. ever since them aliens been showin’ up.

    Meanwhile, back in Deer Trail, Billy Bob gets to mount a nose-cone next to his deer, elk, and grizzly trophies. Yiihaaa!

    Reply

  • Marc

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    That’s all we need, people shooting down drones that cost the pilot 8K-10K to purchase. Imagine how an owner would react to the fact they had been shot down. They have video on them and can usually figure out who was the shooter. They next drone will cost 25K and it will shoot back. Now we have an arms race with Drones. Something else this country does not seed at all.

    Keep in mind that drones do serve some very important purposesfor agriculture, construction, police work, civil projects etc. Shooting them down will probably get you in a lot of trouble and depending on the judge could cost you a great deal of money.

    Reply

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