The CMP Starts Release of 100,000 M1 Garands!

By Dave Dolbee published on in Firearms, Military Surplus, News

Recently, The Shooter’s Log ran a story, detailing President Trump’s order to go a step further than his predecessor and actually release the 100,000 or so 1911s currently being stored by the U.S. Army to the Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP). Several of you left your email and asked to be informed as soon as the CMP began taking orders. While I wish we were reporting that the 1911s were ready for distribution, that’s not the case. However, we have something as good, if not better.

M1 Garand

M1 Garand

During and after World War II, the U.S. loaned tens of thousands of M1 Garands to our allies. Among those allies were the Philippines and Turkey. Approximately 100,000 M1s have been returned and are, or were until very recently, being stored by the U.S. Army. Although technically authorized for sale through the CMP under President Obama, most reading this right now likely believe it was unlikely to ever happen under his administration. However, President Trump’s administration looks at firearms through a different lens.

For the Obama administration, many readers have expressed a belief that signing a piece of paper as a showpiece was one thing, but actually releasing the guns was quite another, and the Obama administration knew it. Fair enough… However, behind the scenes, the U.S. Army (authorized by President Obama’s order) laid the groundwork with the CMP for the eventual release of the rifles, and that has now come to fruition. Today, the Garands are in the hands of the CMP.

Crossing M1 Garands

Just think about it, 100,000 more M1 Garands…

The CMP received the Garands over the last month or so. Currently, the CMP is busy prepping the guns for sale. Each of the M1s will have to be cleaned, inspected, potentially repaired or rebuilt, and then test fired. Afterward, the M1 Garands will be sorted and graded, which ultimately determines each rifle’s sale price.

“We’ve already begun on the Turkish rifles,” CMP Chief Operating Officer Mark Johnson said in an interview with the NRA. “They’re already filtering into the system and there are some on the racks for sale now.” Apparently neither country added any marks on the rifles, so the repatriated guns are not distinguishable from any other M1 Garand, Johnson said.

As previously mentioned, the government also has about 100,000 1911s, which will be sold at a rate of 8,000 to 10,000 a year. Due to the limited supply and anticipated high demand, at least the first lot is scheduled to be sold on a lottery basis.

The CMP is authorized to sell designated surplus military rifles, parts, and ammunition to qualified U.S. citizens “for marksmanship purposes.” There are regulations and hoops you’ll have to jump through to qualify to buy one—like a background check both when applying through the CMP and another from the FFL when you pick it up. Some will squawk about this, but it is Uncle Sam’s guns and his rules. Besides,

The revenue from CMP sales is used to fund operations and programs and to supplement a permanent endowment. For eligibility requirements, check out the CMP website. There you’ll find the CMP has two retail stores, one in Alabama and one Ohio. The CMP also has an online retail site and sells item through an auction site.

The M1 Garand has always been a favorite of shooters and readers of The Shooter’s Log. Do you own or plan to buy a Garand? Will you get it to collect or compete? Share your answers in the comment section.

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Comments (63)

  • Chris Gentry

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    I want a springfield m1 garand

    Reply

  • David Pugh

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    Fantastic news. I love the prospect of being able to get an M1 Garand. My Grandfather was in the Battle of Normandy and was wounded and recieved the Purple heart. He was buried in 94 in the Veterans Cemetary. A Garand is whay he carried. I will probably try to get one. The only problem is the CMP doesn’t give you any photos or anything. Just luck of the draw and it is currently three week till shipment. Great chance at history but if I am throwing down around 8 or 900 dollars I want to know exactly what I am getting. Because these guns were not cared for, they were surplus dust collector for decades, many are beat to hell.

    Reply

    • folma7

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      Regardless of their condition when returned, the US inspects, repairs or replaces worn broken parts such that the condition when sold is very good. I’m sure each weapon is test fired then graded. Mine was graded as “Service Grade” or similar. Please check out CMP’s website where they explain they explain their procedure. I was quite pleased with my rifle. Cheers!

      Reply

  • Alan Martin

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    I really want to own a M1 Garand

    Reply

  • Jeremy W Kilgore

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    So how do I buy an M1 or a 1911? I’m registered for emails, but can’t find any for sell on the site.

    Reply

    • Fred

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      You can only get the CMP guns directly from the CMP website. Google it. Civilian Marksmanship Program.

      Reply

  • Robt Mitchell

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    I bought my International Harvester M1 Garand through the CMP in the early 1980’s for $185. What a great rifle.

    Reply

  • John Valdez

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    When will the M1 Garands be ready for us to purchase from you?

    Reply

  • Joe M.

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    One of the most accurate and sexiest guns ever made in America. If I owned one would be the top gun of my collection. Available in birch wood and American walnut stocks I prefer the later. They are the Cadillac of rifles.

    Reply

  • Joe M.

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    ” M1’s, till they all come home. “

    Reply

  • DaveW

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    While I would love to have one of the M-1s, what I really want is a 1911 like the one I carried in Vietnam. Both would be for shooting, not just show. Unfortunately, due to disability (100%) from Vietnam, shooting holes in targets is limited to simple recreation rather than competition.

    Reply

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