Springfield M1A Loaded in 6.5 Creedmoor

Springfield M1A Loaded Released in 6.5 Creedmoor

Springfield Armory’s M1A Series has a hard-won reputation for handling any mission, any condition, any foe, at any range—and for taking home trophies from monster bucks to National Match crowns. Highly precise .308 WIN-chambered M1A models are found in the hands of elite tactical teams, snipers, backcountry hunters and competitive marksmen. Now, skilled shooters can get unmatched Springfield M1A performance in 6.5 Creedmoor caliber.

A harvest of ducks hanging with a shotgun and camouflage pack

Waterfowl: Take the Advantage

Have ever put your heart and soul into setting up the perfect duck blind and decoy spread only to find the that the ducks had ‘flown the coop’ just before you started hunting them? Did you make a mistake or was it something more innate to the ducks?

National Instant Background Check System NICS logo

#FixNICS: Advocating State Participation

Every federally licensed firearms retailer (FFL) is required by law to run a background check through NICS before transferring a firearm to an individual, whether the transaction is happening in a store, at a gun show, or online. While the merits of of background checks can be debated, so long as the system is in place, most believe it should include the records that disqualify individuals from buying a firearm—criminal and mental health records that prohibit an individual from owning a firearm. The National Shooting Sports Foundation is spearheading an initiative known as FixNICS.

U.S. Law Shield Active Shooter Video cover

Video: Should You Be the Good Samaritan?

The reason most start carrying a concealed weapon is self-protection, with the protection of those around you as a close second. When those around you are your loved ones, and the people whose lives or health is being threatened, it is a fairly easy decision of when to get involved. However, when the threat is merely in your vicinity, or the threat is too strangers, the decision becomes much more blurry. This is true in the individual’s mind and the mind of the courts or legal letter of the law.

Federal Ammunition's 224 Valkyrie video

Redefining the 1,000-Yard Cartridge: Federal .224 Valkyrie

Transform your MSR 15. Loaded with the 90-grain Gold Medal Sierra MatchKing, the all-new .224 Valkyrie provides less wind drift and drop than all other loads in its class and stays supersonic past 1,300 yards. The cartridge is the new choice for both long-range target shooters and hunters. Here is the full release and promo video from Federal Ammunition.

Daisy Red Ryder BB Gun

Daisy Red Ryder: A Boy’s Memory

I am sure many of the readers of The Shooter’s Log started out with a Daisy Red Ryder. Most will remember little Ralphie opening his Red Ryder on Christmas morning in A Christmas Story—or at least his mother’s warning about shooting his eye out with it. Others, such as myself, started with something owning a little more pep such as a Winchester Model 69A .22 Long Rifle—a bolt-action .22 LR that quickly taught me to make every shot count small game such as rabbits and squirrel. Fortunately, a few years after that, I got the Daisy and while Black Bart never crossed my path, I thoroughly enjoyed torturing my little green plastic army men in mock wars for months afterward.

NSSF Range Safety and Etiquette Video cover

Video: Gun Range Safety and Etiquette — A Beginners Guide

Going to an established range is one of the best ways to be introduced to the shooting sports. While getting your start in shooting by going with a friend or family member who is already an experienced shooter is always recommended, shooting at an established range with a professional Range Safety Officer (RSO) or certified instructor is your safest option.

Rob Leatham and Rob Pincus on the firing line

Video: Assessing the Environment During a Self Defense Confrontation

There are a lot of tactical trainers to choose from these days. Some trainers are better than others—as are some students, but that is another story. Occasionally, the lesson may have been taught correctly, but as the word (lesson) spreads, each copy gets a little fuzzier. Before long, self-professed experts, well-intentioned neophytes, and keyboard ninjas are parroting once solid tactics, but their version has drifted so far from the original intent, that the lesson has morphed into something that has wandered over the line into being dangerous.

In this video, Rob Latham and Rob Pincus discuss the differences between the assessment of a stage at a competition and a tactical situation. Common mistakes competition shooters habitually bring to a tactical situation, and the correct way to assess your situation during a confrontation. Are you making some of these mistakes? How many of these mistakes have you seen in live training classes or other online videos.

Share the lessons you learned, tips for others, or general thoughts about the video in the comment section.

Man drawing a firearm while seatbelted in a car

Video: Drawing Your Pistol in a Car

There are those that do and those that do not, but guessing from the majority or comments The Shooter’s Log receives, I’d say most of us believe carrying a firearm means concealed. However, there are multiple ways to carry, both on your person and off body. In my vehicle, I have a holster between the seat and the console. I have also used a magnet or holster under the steering column. All of these methods carry advantages and disadvantages, but the reason I employed these solutions was a belief that I could not effectively draw my handgun from a waistband holster while seat belted.

Suppressor mounted on the end of a rifle barrel

Video: NSSF Hosts Media for Suppressor Demonstration

Perhaps not on the forefront of some gun owners’ minds these days, but the fight for the Second Amendment is a daily struggle. The challenge is not to convince gun owners—at least not in most situations. Instead, the challenge is to educate the non gun owner. Two of the major obstacles to our success are the movies (Hollywood) and the media. Both have a huge influence on the general populace. Neither typically portrays guns factually.

Boone and Crockett position video on gun ownership

Boone & Crockett Club Releases Position Statement on Second Amendment

Knowing who stands with you often determines who are willing to stand with. The primary mission of every conservation organization is, as the name implies, conservation. Thus, it is understandable that donors from both sides of an issue may support an organization that remains focused on its mission and refrains from being to vocal when it comes to political views. That being said, when the Boone and Crockett Club recently released its position paper on the Second Amendment, gun control, and firearm ownership, its answer was firmly stated in the first line, “The Boone and Crockett Club supports the right of citizens to own and use firearms.”

Here is the full release and video from Boone and Crockett.

As the oldest conservation organization in North America, the Boone and Crockett Club is often asked to comment on gun control issues and Second Amendment rights because of the close relationship between gun ownership, hunting, and wildlife conservation.

The Club believes that restricting access to firearms will directly impact participation in hunting, which is essential to the continuing success of wildlife conservation in North America, and elsewhere. The Club is concerned with any restriction on the public’s legal right to own and use firearms for hunting that could weaken or undermine our unique and successful system of wildlife conservation.

Position

The Boone and Crockett Club supports the right of citizens to own and use firearms. The Club maintains that the diverse and abundant wildlife populations that exist in Canada and the United States today are primarily the result of more than a century of wildlife conservation. The public’s right and ability to legally own and use firearms, has been, and remains, critical to the success of this conservation system.

Public ownership of firearms was instrumental to the birth of the conservation movement in North America. This movement was initiated by sportsmen that saw the need for and supported the laws, policies, funding programs, research initiatives, expert agencies, and other delivery mechanisms that are now referred to collectively as the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation. A fundamental basis of this Model is that every citizen has the right to hunt for specific legal purposes, which requires the ability to own and use a firearm. Wildlife conservation would not and could not have come into existence, nor will it endure, without the public ownership of firearms.

Conservation is active and hands-on. It is a series of actions by people to maintain the integrity and continuity of nature. Hunting is one of these actions. Hunting itself is a mechanism for wildlife conservation, but most importantly it engages people in seeing the need for conservation and its results. Because of traditional outdoor activities like hunting, sportsmen have a vested interest in the security and proper management of the game species they hunt. This advocacy and stewardship extends to the habitats that support these species, which in turn benefits all wildlife—both hunted and non-hunted.

The sustainable harvest of game species is the primary means of keeping wildlife populations healthy, within the carrying capacity of their habitats, and to socially-acceptable levels. The majority of wildlife conservation programs are also largely funded through a “user pays–everyone benefits” system of licenses, permits, and excise taxes on firearms and ammunition paid by sportsmen and recreational shooters. Eliminating the right to own or use a firearm, which is the means by which the majority of game is hunted, would lead to a collapse of the very system that is responsible for wildlife and healthy ecosystems.

The Boone and Crockett Club maintains that hunting is crucial to successful wildlife conservation, that gun ownership is fundamental to hunting, and that all three are critical to one another. The Club believes the best way to ensure well-managed, well-funded and sustainable wildlife conservation programs includes the right to keep and bear arms as guaranteed by the Second Amendment of the Constitution of the United States.

The Boone and Crockett Club has come out firmly in support of the Second Amendment. Whether or not you are a hunter, I am sure we can all support the B&C’s conservation efforts.

How has the Boone and Crockett Club’s position statement affected your view of it? Are you more likely to support it in the future? Have you supported it in the past? Share your answers in the comment section.

SLRule

Growing up in Pennsylvania’s game-rich Allegany region, Dave Dolbee was introduced to whitetail hunting at a young age. At age 19 he bought his first bow while serving in the U.S. Navy, and began bowhunting after returning from Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm. Dave was a sponsored Pro Staff Shooter for several top archery companies during the 1990s and an Olympic hopeful holding up to 16 archery records at one point. During Dave’s writing career, he has written for several smaller publications as well as many major content providers such as Guns & Ammo, Shooting Times, Outdoor Life, Petersen’s Hunting, Rifle Shooter, Petersen’s Bowhunting, Bowhunter, Game & Fish magazines, Handguns, F.O.P Fraternal Order of Police, Archery Business, SHOT Business, OutdoorRoadmap.com, TheGearExpert.com and others. Dave is currently a staff writer for Cheaper Than Dirt!

View all articles by Dave Dolbee