Three rifle cartridges styles

Developing a Consistent Reloading Procedure

You have to understand the reason you want to reload to determine the best procedures, and level of detail, you want to put in each load. Economy is always one reason, but that does not mean the goal of producing accurate ammunition is in any way lessoned. This means a consistent procedure is required. If you are ready to start reloading, or potentially up your reloading game, here’s how.

Lyman 50th reloading manual

Reloading: Load Density

The load density formula has provided excellent results for handloaders for many years. The main reason is simply that the load density formula works without fail. Eighty-five percent density is just about ideal, but let’s look at how reloaders have come to that number.

Two cartridge cases, one showing a crack

Reloading: Reclaiming Brass

Let’s look at the process of reclaiming the brass for reuse. There is nothing wrong with getting ready to reload by buying new brass. However, after you fire that shiny new brass the first time, you’ll want to prepare it to be used again. You may also scavenge the local shooting range or buy some once fired brass for reloading. Either way, here is your ‘primer’ for reclaiming brass for reloading.

The .45 Colt and single-action revolver are a powerful and useful combination.

Loading for the .45 Colt

I have used most of the popular old west calibers at one time or another, including the .32-20 and .41 Colt. Some have more merit than others. My favorite, hands down, is the .45 Colt. I began shooting long before Cowboy Action Shooting became popular. Most of us loaded for economy and with a certain number of loads put up for performance.

Sierra Hunter round-nose bullets

The Advantages of Handloading

I am the first to admit that factory ammunition has improved considerably during the past three decades. Consistency, accuracy, and performance are better than ever. This is largely due to the pressure put on factories by handloaders. Today, a handloader can produce more accurate ammunition than the factory.

Red Army 7.62x25mm Tokarev

Range Report: The 7.62 x 25mm

I have to admit to a number of rather odd stablemates resting in the safe alongside my 1911, SIG, and HK handguns. These firearms may have a historical or mechanical interest, or they may simply be fun to use and fire. The 7.62 x 25mm pistols are among the most interesting.

Brass rifle cartridge cases

Reloading 101: The Cartridge Case

Bear with me! We’ll get started on the process of handloading next time when I talk about setting up a sizing die. But before that, it’s good to keep in mind what we’re dealing with, and that is a cartridge case, and also what happens to it during firing, which is what we’re setting out to remedy when we reuse it.