You Make the Call: Gun-Phobic Professor Quits Over Campus Carry

By Dave Dolbee published on in Concealed Carry, General, News

Who would have thought that simply passing campus carry at a state university could have such an effect? Although my daughter won’t be going to college for at least a decade, Kansas University is looking pretty good. I carry, and want my children to have the same option whether at home or college. However, at least one Kansas professor disagrees. His open letter makes some rather outrageous claims to supporters of the Second Amendment.

Students for Concealed Carry logo

The Backstory

In 2013, the Kansas Legislature passed legislation allowing lawful gun owners to carry concealed handguns on all Kansas university campuses and in campus buildings, beginning July 1, 2017. In order to be in compliance with state law, the Kansas Board of Regents approved its new weapons policy on January 20, 2016. This policy applies to all Regents institutions, but allows each university to determine some specific ways to implement the policy on their campuses. The Regents asked KU and the other institutions to submit their policies by October 2016.

After eight months of work—headed by its university-wide Weapons Policy Advisory Committee and two campus implementation committees—KU submitted its draft weapons policy to the Regents on October 10. The Regents governance committee approved its policy at the November board meeting. The policy was approved by the full board December 14, 2016.

And the Professor Who Can’t Handle It

Jacob Dorman: Why I’m resigning from KU, an Open Letter

In light of the state of Kansas’ apparent determination to allow the concealed carry of firearms in the classrooms of the University of Kansas, I am writing to tender my resignation effective two weeks from today as an associate professor of history and American studies at the university. I have accepted a job in a state that bans concealed carry in classrooms.

I proudly served as a KU professor for a decade, from 2007 until 2017, and have a great deal of affection and gratitude to the university, Lawrence and the state of Kansas. Kansas is a great and beautiful state that is refreshingly different than the coasts. I have enjoyed getting to know Kansans from all parts of the state as my students, neighbors and friends, and I’ve especially benefited from getting to know Kansans from rural communities where gun ownership and hard work are equally a way of life. But Kansas will never secure the future that it deserves if it weakens its institutions of higher learning by driving off faculty members or applicants who feel as I do that there is no place for firearms in classrooms. Kansas can have great universities, or it can have concealed carry in classrooms, but it cannot have both.

Associate Professor Jason Dorman

Associate Professor Jason Dorman

In practical terms, concealed carry has proven to be a failure. Campus shootings have become all too frequent, and arming students has done nothing to quell active shooter situations because students do not have the training to effectively combat shooters and rightly fear becoming identified as suspects themselves. But beyond the fact that concealed carry does not deter gun violence, the citizens and elected representatives of Kansas must recognize that this is a small state, and in order to run a premier university, which is necessary for the health and wealth of the state, it must recruit professors from out of state. Recruiting the best trained professors necessarily means recruiting from coastal areas and progressive college towns where most people do not believe that randomly arming untrained students is a proper exercise of the Second Amendment’s protection of a well-regulated militia.

Moreover, we discuss sensitive and highly charged topics in my classroom, concerning anti-religious bias, racism, sexism, classism and many other indexes of oppression and discrimination. Students need to be able to express themselves respectfully and freely, and they cannot do so about heated topics if they know that fellow students are armed and that an argument could easily be lethal. Guns in the classroom will have a chilling effect on free speech and hinder the university’s mission to facilitate dialogue across lines of division. That stifling of dialogue will hurt all students, including the ones with guns in their pockets.

Let us not let the NRA destroy the future of the state of Kansas with a specious argument about the Second Amendment. Guns do not belong in classrooms any more than they belong in courtrooms, but a university simply cannot afford metal detectors at every entrance. Kansas faces a very clear choice: does it want excellent universities with world class faculty, or does it want to create an exodus of faculty like myself who have options to teach in states that ban weapons in classrooms? Does Kansas want to reinvent itself as a center of innovation and prosperity, and attract the minds that will create the jobs that the state needs to be prosperous for the 21st century, or does it want third-rate universities that will not find the cures, patent the drugs, train the engineers, start the companies, or innovate the laws and social programs that will bring the state lasting prosperity and health?

This is the truly concealed question that faces Kansas’ citizens and legislators in the concealed carry debate. I hope for the sake of the future of the great state of Kansas that its Legislature will make the right decision and take a stand against weapons in classrooms, and in favor of excellence in education.

Kansas University blue and white logo

Conclusion

It is quite obvious the professor thinks quite highly of himself. Of course, how could Kansas, or any midwest state for that matter, ever hope to produce an intellectual of his caliber? “Recruiting the best trained professors necessarily means recruiting from coastal areas and progressive college towns…” And how about the absurd accusation that people cannot have an intelligent or honest conversation if there is the possibility of a student being armed? How many students are returning military with multiple combat tours? I mean, “randomly arming untrained students…” really? I suppose this means the people educated in coastal, ivy league universities are the product of schools that mold young minds instead of teaching them to actually think and reason for themselves.

You Make the Call

I’ll admit it; I’ve earned several degrees from a coastal schools, including some from liberal schools, including UCLA which Dorman also attended. However, before that, I did a couple of hitches in the military including time in the sandbox in the first Gulf War. So, what do you think? Should students be allowed to carry on campus? Is Prof. Dorman rightfully afraid to teach at KU, or just another gun hater? Was Thomas Jefferson correct when he said, “An armed society is a polite society” or would the potential presence of a firearm stifle open dialogue? Did the Jayhawks ranking just go up in your estimation?

Share your answers, as well as your opinion, on this this story and the author’s points in the comment section.

SLRule

Growing up in Pennsylvania’s game-rich Allegany region, Dave Dolbee was introduced to whitetail hunting at a young age. At age 19 he bought his first bow while serving in the U.S. Navy, and began bowhunting after returning from Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm. Dave was a sponsored Pro Staff Shooter for several top archery companies during the 1990s and an Olympic hopeful holding up to 16 archery records at one point. During Dave’s writing career, he has written for several smaller publications as well as many major content providers such as Guns & Ammo, Shooting Times, Outdoor Life, Petersen’s Hunting, Rifle Shooter, Petersen’s Bowhunting, Bowhunter, Game & Fish magazines, Handguns, F.O.P Fraternal Order of Police, Archery Business, SHOT Business, OutdoorRoadmap.com, TheGearExpert.com and others. Dave is currently a staff writer for Cheaper Than Dirt!

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Comments (145)

  • Wood

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    to dprato,

    here here,

    Not to engage on these issues means that you might as well be right wing or left wing congressman obstructionist or an independent congressional obstructionist. AND see what that has got us in the last 20 years.

    Reply

    • dprato

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      Its just comments like that make me choose to ignore folks like yourself so do me a favor and realize this is the very last time I will respond to you on here.

      Reply

  • Wood

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    G-Man,
    So that brings us to the portion of my comment in which I wrote, “Maybe it’s time to turn our attention back on the brain behind the trigger”.
    Your conclusions were magically insightful on employee incidents to date.

    Perhaps the G in G-man stands for Postal Inspector, Postal Manager or Postal Mail Carrier.

    The City Counsel in the city I live in wants to add words below our city name to state “In God We Trust”

    With your thinking there should be an additional line saying:
    ” Everybody keep your hands where I can see them”

    Reply

    • G-Man

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      @ Wood,

      I’ve been posting to the Shooter’s Log for many years, so the regular readers here know I am an active federal law enforcement agent with 35 years of service and counting; hence my nickname of “G-Man”.

      While the United States Postal Inspection Service (USPIS) is quite capable of running their own internal investigations, from time-to-time they do solicit our help or assign inspectors to our joint task forces which focus on specific crimes that may involve the mail system.

      I am sorry that I cannot speak to the rest of your comment as frankly it did not make any sense to me.

      However, given the undeniable Christian foundations which started this Country, I do highly commend your City of Fresno for unanimously voting to add “In God We Trust” to the wall of their council chamber.

      A tip for you: Rather than starting a new thread each time you want to reply to a person’s comment, instead click the red colored “Reply” link directly beneath their last comment. Otherwise, starting whole new thread breaks the continuity and flow of the total exchange when it is just between 2 people.

      Reply

    • Dave Dolbee

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      AS the moderator, I can more than vouch for G-Man’s credentials. ~Dave Dolbee

      Reply

    • G-Man

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      @ Dave Dolbee,

      Thank you for the validation. As well, thank you for your exceptional work and dedication towards keeping America informed on the issues that matter most.

      I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: Of all the forums that offer reader responses, your Shooter’s Log is the only forum that I have consistently engaged over the years.

      It is fine writers like you that make this forum such a success. So please keep up the fantastic work. I salute you.

      Reply

    • Dave Dolbee

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      @ G-Man,

      Thank you sir. From you that means more than I can say. I am truly humbled.

      If you are ever interested in writing for The Shooter’s Log (when you retire), please feel free to reach out at that time. We would love to expand your role and analysis of the issues as only someone with your intellect and experience can. ~Dave Dolbee

      Reply

  • Elton P. Green

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    I retired from the US Army Infantry branch at Ft. Riley, KS. in 2003. I lived in Kansas from 1998 until 2010. During that period of time, I watched the people of Kansas win the debate on concealed carry in their state. They have since taken it further to open carry within the state. I have been through the concealed carry class in Kansas, and had their license. Their training is designed to familiarize the individual with the laws of Kansas and to confirm that the individual knows his or her handgun well enough to use it effectively. Colorado’s class is much the same. They both assume one is familiar with firearms. I follow the news in Kansas. I have several friends who are still in Kansas. I have some questions for the professor about some of his statements.
    First, what campus shootings? This law has only been in effect since October of 2016, and approved and instituted at KU only since December, 2016. I have heard of no shootings or violence involving firearms on any Kansas institutions of higher learning of any kind since its passing or since it has been applied. Did I miss something in the news? To the best of my knowledge, there have been NO active shooter incidents at any of the colleges in Kansas since this went into effect.
    Second, as to training with weapons, either firearms or other types, many of the students of these universities are former or active military. I was a student at Kansas State after retirement, and I used to instruct both pistol and rifle marksmanship, basic and advanced over my 20 year career in the Infantry. I was even an armorer for a while. Most of the former military students are highly trained in the use and safety of various types of firearms. The concealed carry class simply adds to their knowledge of the laws of Kansas. Also, as a group, these men and women are highly stable emotionally. The have been taught to be so in an unforgiving school, that of a combat environment. They are taught to think before acting, and their lives at times have been at risk when instability would have killed them. Also, quite a few of these people, especially those in combat arms, are trained in combatives. If they wanted to maim or kill one, they could do it without a firearm.
    Third, this man is a liberal arts professor. He doesn’t teach in any area of hard science. I cannot say if or how much he is liberal in his personal politics, but as a professor, he adds nothing direct to the training of engineers, chemists, physics or any other area of scientific development. At most, they have to pass his class as a required course to make sure they are ‘educationally rounded’ as part of their degree requirements. I seriously doubt that campus carry will worry any of the professors who teach in the hard sciences. If the past is a teacher, campus carry will make the campus environment safer.
    Fifth, as to being a deterrent, concealed carry has been proven to be very effective in passive deterrence, and active deterrence both. I see no evidence that it will not prove to be so in this instance, too. If I were going to speak in a public forum on any of the liberal campuses today, I’d want some emotionally stable people in the crowd to be armed, if only to stop the ‘activists’ from trying to attack me for my views, which has happened several times lately, even to speakers who are in my view somewhat radical in their liberal views.
    Finally, this could be simply fear. This professor may simply be afraid and using all of this to cover for his personal fear. I have no doubt that he had already secured a new position elsewhere and this is his parting shot at rationalizing his personal fear. I don’t think that concealed carry would do other than insure that debate in his or any other class would be somewhat more polite. Or perhaps this professor is somewhat belligerent with his students and fears that this would threaten his ‘teaching style”. I’ve had professors who were so. I do know that what he says in his letter is neither true nor accurate, thus his conclusions are erroneous.

    Reply

  • JB

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    Recently on the University of Texas at Austin campus, there was a deranged person who attacked several people with a knife, killing one of them, a freshman student. What the media refused to mention was a student with a license to carry was the one who stopped the attacks. When the student pulled his gun, the deranged person took off running and when he went around the corner, the police caught him. If that brave student with a license to carry had not been carrying his pistol and intervened, there would’ve been a lot more students injured or killed. I guess Professor Dorman doesn’t live in the world of facts, only his fictional notion that people who go through all the training and documentation to have a license to carry a handgun somehow make it unsafe.

    Reply

  • Suddenimpact

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    @ Dragon Yes Dragon, I was wondering what the Millennials had as an affliction. Thank you for explaining that. They still can’t accept that Hillary lost the election and now they need therapy for that. LOL

    Reply

  • Reflex Handgun

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    One less communist in higher ed? Sounds good to me.

    Reply

  • dave

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    professor Dorman can move to MEXIFORNIA & preach his anti gun message & get elected to political office. he will fit right in with the JERRY MOONBEAM BROWN RULING CLASS. it appears that MANDATORY GUN CONFISCATION is in the works out on the LEFT COAST. just a matter of time.

    Reply

  • Pa

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    Mr. Dorman is just another (((tribe))) member who is working for the Gun Confiscation Lobby (GCL). I’m quite sure he’ll find employment directly with GCL in the near future, if he hasn’t already.

    Insincere, virulent, vicious, scheming, without ethincs or morals.

    Typical (((tribe))) behavior. See Senator Charles Schumer for the template.

    Reply

  • Wood

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    Dave, 21 Handgun 18 long gun.

    That is Federal Law to own a gun. To date I know of no CCW law that allows one to barrow a gun to carry.

    Reply

  • Wood

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    This to G-man

    The no carry zone at my County Court House seems to work, (thanks to the Sheriffs Deputies and the metal detector upon entry).

    Haven’t heard of any postal shootings for some time, (perhaps 20 years in a post office facility). I don’t think there are (security personal with metal detectors), all throe some times I wish they did when a FFL sends my a hand gun to my store for an FFL transfer. The box won’t fit in the mail box.

    I am an FFL and CCW holder. I would not be in the business of selling guns if I could not carry a loaded gun at work or home, as a FFL.

    Maybe it’s time to turn our attention back on the brain behind the trigger
    save putting metal detectors at every corner store seven eleven and ice-cream store in the US.

    what do you think…

    Reply

    • G-Man

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      @Wood,

      I am not certain if you were attempting to refute certain aspects of my post by bringing up the perceived effectiveness of weapons bans at your county court or postal facilities, but regardless, your comment actually supports my position.

      My post actually cited, and I quote, “…especially when your bans don’t even attempt to offer me additional security to replace that which you’ve stripped me of providing myself.”

      In direct correlation to my comment, the specific facilities you’ve mention actually do rise to the level of additional and exceptional security measures and responsibility I’ve mentioned – in exchange for forcibly waiving our Second Amendment Rights when visiting or working within those facilities.

      However, the same could never be said for all these liberal school campuses and other random places that demand we be stripped of our constitutional right to protect ourselves. Instead they just demand all the guns banned, but don’t ever think in exchange that it is their responsibility to implement additional protections to mitigate the security deficit they create with their bans.

      But even within those more secure facilities you’ve mentioned, they are still not infallible. Not a year goes by that we don’t hear plenty of news stories about shootings in court rooms where bailiffs or deputies had their guns overtaken by a defendant in chains and still managed to kill a few before being subdued or even escaping.

      As for the Postal Facilities – the issue was disgruntled employees, not the patrons; which explains why you don’t always see “security personal with metal detectors” up front. But such security measures have been implemented quite extensively behind the scenes since their last shooting; and thus would explain the reduction in deadly work-place violence occurrences.

      So that brings us to the portion of your comment in which you wrote, “Maybe it’s time to turn our attention back on the brain behind the trigger”. Interestingly the Postal Service is a prime example of an organization that has done precisely that in the aftermath of their work-place tragedies.

      Millions of dollars have since been invested towards the Postal Service’s implementation of advanced programs that involve extensive pre-employment screenings, ongoing stress management practices and classes for employees, work-place conflict resolution counseling, dedicated Mail Center Security Coordinators and staff, along with advance facility detection systems and additional armed Postal Inspectors who are trained to investigate and act on even the slightest hint of a disgruntled employee.

      While such measures have virtually prevented any more postal worker deaths, look at the immense cost, manpower, and effort associated with such prevention. And even then the Postal Service still has their less lethal instances resulting in bodily harm caused by internal disgruntled employees; but you never get to read about those occurrences because they are investigated internally and officially sealed as undisclosed employee matters.

      So in conclusion – despite all the best efforts, the only dependable measure to self-preservation will always be reliance on none other than one’s self. The framers of the Second Amendment understood this and it is as viable today as it ever was.

      Reply

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