The BATFE Wants to Hear From You — “Bump Fire” Stocks

By Dave Dolbee published on in Gun Gear

The Department of Justice (DOJ) anticipates issuing a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) that would interpret the statutory definition of “machinegun” in the National Firearms Act of 1934 and Gun Control Act of 1968 to clarify whether certain devices, commonly known as “bump fire” stocks, fall within that definition. Before doing so, the DOJ and ATF need to gather information and comments from the public and industry regarding the nature and scope of the market for these devices.

Bump Fire stock

Dates

Written comments must be postmarked and electronic comments must be submitted on or before January 25, 2018. Commenters should be aware that the electronic Federal Docket Management System will not accept comments after Midnight Eastern Standard Time on the last day of the comment period.

Addresses

You may submit comments, identified by docket number (2017R-22), by any of the following methods:

Federal eRulemaking Portal: Click Here

Fax: (202) 648-9741

Mail: Vivian Chu, Mailstop 6N-518, Office of Regulatory Affairs, Enforcement Programs and Services, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives, 99 New York Ave. NE, Washington DC 20226. ATTN: 2017R-22

ATF Logo

Instructions

All submissions received must include the agency name and docket number for this advance notice of proposed rulemaking (ANRPM). All comments received will be posted without change to the Federal eRulemaking portal, http://www.regulations.gov, including any personal information provided. For detailed instructions on submitting comments and additional information on the rulemaking process, see the Public Participation section of the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section of this document.

What are your views regarding bump fire stocks? Do you think they need to be regulated? Share your answers in the comment section.

SLRule

Growing up in Pennsylvania’s game-rich Allegany region, Dave Dolbee was introduced to whitetail hunting at a young age. At age 19 he bought his first bow while serving in the U.S. Navy, and began bowhunting after returning from Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm. Dave was a sponsored Pro Staff Shooter for several top archery companies during the 1990s and an Olympic hopeful holding up to 16 archery records at one point. During Dave’s writing career, he has written for several smaller publications as well as many major content providers such as Guns & Ammo, Shooting Times, Outdoor Life, Petersen’s Hunting, Rifle Shooter, Petersen’s Bowhunting, Bowhunter, Game & Fish magazines, Handguns, F.O.P Fraternal Order of Police, Archery Business, SHOT Business, OutdoorRoadmap.com, TheGearExpert.com and others. Dave is currently a staff writer for Cheaper Than Dirt!

View all articles by Dave Dolbee

Tags: ,

Trackback from your site.

The mission of Cheaper Than Dirt!'s blog, "The Shooter's Log," is to provide information-not opinions-to our customers and the shooting community. We want you, our readers, to be able to make informed decisions. The information provided here does not represent the views of Cheaper Than Dirt!

Comments (64)

  • Jim

    |

    The ATF have been overstepping their bounds for years and it’s time we the people stand up and rise up and take back our country starting with the slime in Washington DC whoare lining their pockets and are not protesting our rights starting with the democrats and working our way up,

    Reply

  • David

    |

    I feel that a bump stock is nothing more than an accessory that needs no restrictions or regulations from the BATF.

    Reply

  • Mike

    |

    It’s just another waste of time it’s not a material item that’s the problem it’s people someone that is fast with their finger can do as much damage

    Reply

  • Raymond

    |

    Absolutely not!

    Leave the Bump Stock alone.

    I do not own one, probably never will…but I know enough to know it IS NOT an automatic weapon.

    Just like firearm length, pistol grip, bayonet, suppressor, magazine capacity or bipod…

    None of these and more, make a firearm more capable or more threatening.

    Leave it be.

    Reply

  • Charles Young

    |

    Enough of the abject draconian rules. Bump stocks are not any more dangerous than a fast trigger finger..

    Reply

    • LEVELLER

      |

      @ Charles Young

      Really! I don’t think I could pull the trigger that fast.

      Reply

    • BUURGA

      |

      Then why buy one? They’re junk anyway.

      Reply

  • 70's Ops

    |

    C’mon y’all, everybody knows that they’re fun once or twice. Break it out for an afternoon, put it away. Its to me a novelty. A fun gadget. No need for more confusing legislation. Yeah, like a suppressor is a firearm.

    Reply

    • BUURGA

      |

      Novelty? A firearm is not a ‘novelty’ platform. And bump stocks are junk, anyway.

      Reply

    • 70's Ops

      |

      Well Buurga, if you read the definition of novelty, it says a new or unusual item, an inexpensive item. Not like the toy in cracker jacks. Quit being so darn literal.

      Reply

  • Griz44Mag

    |

    Personally, everyone I see using these are blinger bonehead idiots. Lighting of 100 or more rounds in a couple of minutes and hitting a target maybe 3 times. You know the type, the ones that do wheel stands on crotch rockets running 70 miles an hour on public roads. They serve no useful purpose.
    That said, I will put Constitutional rights ahead of my personal feelings every time. NFA is unconstitutional at it’s very root. The 2nd says nothing about type, size, or length of any particular type or style of firearm. That’s good with me. I stay away from the boneheads who use these devices and belong to a club that prohibits them, by member vote of 1800 2nd amendment supporters.But, I will fight to protect their right to own and use ANY type of firearm they desire. I just ask that they don’t use them around me.

    Reply

    • goodtimes

      |

      I too do not believe America will benefit from a new gun law. But I have to ask; you say you do not support a new Federal law, but yet you belong to a gun club that prohibits their use. It’s kind of like if if you want to live in California you have to abide by their gun laws or leave; same with your gun club not allowing legal gun accessories. Deep down what is the difference? A new person to your club cannot use one no matter what his convictions. Not unlike the Feds. I prefer to not give up my rights to own a gun, no matter what configuration.

      There is no argument that you were able to vote on it at your gun club because it limits future members, again not unlike the government. And you have the right to not join or to leave the club, just like not moving to or leaving California, or the U.S. for that matter.

      Reply

    • Fred

      |

      A “bump fire” stock, just like extended magazines, is NOT a firearm, therefore the BATFE has absolutely NO jurisdiction. How many times do legal honest gun owners have to suffer because ONE insane person commits a multiple murder? I want all gun laws repealed back to the NFA act, including the 1968 gun control law.
      If you own a gun, you should be right in front of the protests against draconian and useless gun laws. “Shall not be infringed” means “no interference” in owning a firearm. We do not need more gun laws, we need a new Government that is owned and directed by the Constituents, not the Congress that “protects” (read steals) our rights under the Constitution. Enough is enough, all the Congress is interested in is controlling the people so they can steal money and power away from us, and get re-elected as easily as possible so they can continue the robbing and stealing.

      Reply

    • 70's Ops

      |

      Hey Griz…I appreciate the fact that you aren’t real happy with bumpstocks, or the people that own them. And neither is your club. Ya have to admit though, for someone who has not been in the military, and has never had access to automatic weapons, its an awesome afternoon of fun. Mine sits in the closet. Occasionally my son will grab it for the weekend, but that’s it. It seems that full auto is quite expensive when Uncle Sam isn’t footing the bill. Even at a turtles pace of 300 rounds/minute, that’s near $80/ minute. But, if you have the money, that’s your choice, and you should HAVE that choice. Thanks for sticking up for 2A regardless of your personal feelings.

      Reply

    • Ray

      |

      So well put, when we go around and start denying others the right to practice their discipline the way they want, how long before we have to as well? I agree with you, operating a firearm and being responsible with it comes before federal legislation that muddles the original intent has undies in a bundle everywhere, this is not the road we should travel.

      Reply

    • KN

      |

      Kind of like the gun shops that have signs saying, “No loaded weapons allowed inside.” You’re a huge hypocrite.
      If your club (which probably has NRA affiliation) has banned these, then you’ve already sent the message forth as a group that you don’t support people’s rights to own one. Stop talking out of both sides of your mouth and riding the fence.

      Reply

    • Griz44mag

      |

      KN, do YOU own a crotch rocket?
      No hypocrisy here, no different than a golf club barring spiked shoes on their hardwood floors to prevent damage. Full auto or bumpstocks are horrible concerning accuracy. Someone spraying bullets all over the place destroy equipment and run the risk of putting rounds over the berms. WE, the members of the club are not denying anyone their rights. For those that want to be irresponsible, there are other clubs that may suit them better. BTW, there are NO public ranges that I can find anywhere close to here that allow rapid fire of any kind. When asked why, they will always express concern about inaccuracy, range equipment damage and risk of flyers getting off the property. If those so inclined want to do this, they are free to use their own property to do so.. No “rights” are violated in the process.

      Reply

    • Spencer

      |

      I agree! It seems to me anyone who shoots one of those things has more money than brains & a very expensive ego that needs a boost as often as possible. They need to grow up.
      Back in the 70s I had an FFL for about 7 years and any full-auto firearm to be authorized by the AFTD of the IRS and had to apply for an expensive license just to own one. If you wanted more than one, a seperate license was required for each one. If you wanted to sell one, it was required for a person you deal with, to also have a separate license of their own. No one was allowed to own more than one for each license.
      So I conclude if someone wants to own one of these that shoot at a rate of a full automatic, they should have a special license just like they need for a full auto firearm.

      Reply

  • f auten

    |

    I feel strongly the legal gun owners all believe we are safer and well armed as to prevent our wepons from falling into the wrong hands. we are of the belief we have no need for any regulation on the bump stock .
    Any bad guy is not going thru legal means to obtain fire arms .My personal view is no one should be able to prevent legal gun owners from the right we have under our constitution .
    Please understand if you could go door and try to remove all firearms . still untold millions of armed citizens would come out to replace these ,.
    this country has allways had a vision of safe training and storage of its citizens arms . bad guys steal from folks who have no one to guide them in secure arms. most gun clubs try to solve this .
    Guns donrt kill people People kill people .
    Education is the key . if you passed a bill tomorrow to prohibit drinking smoking and as of late durgs …….. in 30 days they would reappear . Educate the ones who will help solve the issue of bad guys stealing your neighbors arms because they are to dang laszy to work ….thank you Frank

    Reply

    • 70's Ops

      |

      Gotta kinda agree. I will say this though. While those bad guys are spraying the area willy-nilly with .223 projectiles, I will patiently wait the 6 or so seconds for them to have to re-load, then do as trained. 1 shot. Thank you very much.

      Reply

  • Bob

    |

    I bought a bumpfire stock years ago, installed it, hmned and hawed over it for a while, then removed it and threw it away, unfired. Why? I have the real thing. Should they be outlawed? Absolutely not. For me, between GCA 1968 and the Hughes Amendment, there is absolutely no room for a single piece of further gun-related legislation. It’s time to roll a lot of it back and consign it to the rubbish bin.

    Reply

    • G

      |

      I have fired a bump stock … sure it was fun, however for me ammo is too expensive so I won’t buy one. However I would never tell anyone else they could not have one … so I say no to any additional regulations on a bump stock. I mean really, just leave it alone. Good comment Bob.

      Reply

Leave a comment

Your discussions, feedback and comments are welcome here as long as they are relevant and insightful. Please be respectful of others. We reserve the right to edit as appropriate, delete profane, harassing, abusive and spam comments or posts, and block repeat offenders. All comments are held for moderation and will appear after approval.

Time limit is exhausted. Please reload the CAPTCHA.

%d bloggers like this: