Gizmos & Gadgets — Gun Socks

By Dave Dolbee published on in Gun Gear

There are times when a bombproof container is necessary to protect your firearms from the elements and other times when a velvet hand will do the trick. Either way, you do not want to risk your trusty firearms to a no name product just to save a buck—and thanks to Plano, you probably wouldn’t even save a buck.

For well over a half-century Plano has been building the most intelligently engineered storage solutions, the vast majority predicated on toughness and tireless protection of your valuable gear.

However, it’s not always about wall thicknesses and crash tests. Rather, protection may be achieved through delicate handling with a companion focus on removing moisture from the equation. And this job lands squarely in the wheelhouse of Plano’s new Gun Guard Gun Socks.

Plano Gun Sock

Designed to protect firearms from rust, dirt and scratches, Plano’s new Gun Guard Gun Socks are made of a special silicone-treated material that keeps out moisture and dust. Ideal for year-round storage.

A series of soft but serious firearm sleeves, Gun Guard Gun Socks are soft Silicone Treated materials that serve a couple of key purposes. For one, the Gun Guard Gun Sock offers TLC-grade protection against dings and scratches for short-term handling, such as around the cabin or shooting range. This degree of tender-treatment protects everything from the bluing of barrels to intricate engravings on the action. Gun collectors will find Gun Guard Gun Socks particularly effective in their ginger treatment of antique and priceless firearms.

The second level of protection is geared toward long-term storage. The Silicone Treated material thwarts the build-up of moisture, both keeping wetness outside and condensation from forming on the inside. No rust, no fuss.Shop Now for a soft gun case at Cheaper Than Dirt

How many of your firearms do you keep stored in gun socks? Any other uses than firearms? Tell us in the comment section.

SLRule

SLRule

Growing up in Pennsylvania’s game-rich Allegany region, Dave Dolbee was introduced to whitetail hunting at a young age. At age 19 he bought his first bow while serving in the U.S. Navy, and began bowhunting after returning from Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm. Dave was a sponsored Pro Staff Shooter for several top archery companies during the 1990s and an Olympic hopeful holding up to 16 archery records at one point. During Dave’s writing career, he has written for several smaller publications as well as many major content providers such as Guns & Ammo, Shooting Times, Outdoor Life, Petersen’s Hunting, Rifle Shooter, Petersen’s Bowhunting, Bowhunter, Game & Fish magazines, Handguns, F.O.P Fraternal Order of Police, Archery Business, SHOT Business, OutdoorRoadmap.com, TheGearExpert.com and others. Dave is currently a staff writer for Cheaper Than Dirt!

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Comments (3)

  • Jerry Koester

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    I keep most of my firearms in gun socks/sacks. I haven’t any issues with rust with these silicone treated covers.. Good protection!

    Reply

    • George R Clark

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      I used these socks for a relatively short 4 month storage. I added a desiccant into the sock as extra protection. I had no issues and the guns came out just as I put them in. I’m curious though if anyone has used these socks for longer storage and if they did any extra protection.

      Reply

    • Chris

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      I have stored guns in these socks for years – without desiccant packs and dehumidifiers in my safe. I have not had any issues with rust or anything else. Other than rust protection, the socks provide ding protection , and as anyone with a safe could tell you, when digging for a particular gun, they can bump each other, causing dings and other minor damage.

      Reply

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